Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Stellar activity and planetary signal - Giusi Micela

35 views

Published on

Brave new worlds
May 29-June 03, 2016 – Lake Como School of Advanced Studies

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Stellar activity and planetary signal - Giusi Micela

  1. 1. Stellar  ac)vity  and  planetary   signal   G.  Micela   Brave  new  worlds   May  29-­‐June  03,  2016  –  Lake  Como  School  of  Advanced  Studies  
  2. 2. The  Sun  surface  is  structured   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Any  inhomogeneity  introduces  a  noise  
  3. 3. Major  sources  of  intrinsic  noise  in   solar-­‐like  stars   Phenomenon     )mescale   Amplitude  (m/s)   Oscilla=ons   5-­‐10  min   0.3  -­‐0.5     Spots/ac=vity   4-­‐50  days  (rota=on)   1  -­‐  100   Convec=on   0.1-­‐20  yr   ~10   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       • Astrophysical  noise  is  the  limi=ng  factor  to  exoplanet  observa=ons   • The  RV  precision  will  be  limited  by  intrinsic  stellar  variability.   • The  “quietest“  stars  may  be  constant  @0.5  –  1  m/s  
  4. 4. Normally  Stellar  Oscilla)ons  are     not  a  problem   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Rapid oscillations of an Ap star (P = 11 min)  
  5. 5. Radial-­‐velocity  signal  entangled  with   stellar  ac)vity  RV  signatures   •  “The”  problem  for  low  mass  planet  detec=on   •  Magne=c  ac=vity  can  lead  to  false  detec=ons   (Queloz  et  al.  2001,  Bonfils  et  al.  2007,  Huélamo  et   al.  2008,  Boisse  et  al.  2009,  2011,  …)   •  OVen  the  ac=vity  induced  signal  comparable   with  keplerian  signals   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  6. 6. Ac)vity  is  a  coloured  phenomenon   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Inohmogenei=es     +   Rota=on   !  )me  –  variable  spectral  distor)on  
  7. 7. Spots  induced  rv  jiIer   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  8. 8. Ac)vity  is  a  coloured  phenomenon   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       •   Single  spot  on  Sun-­‐like  star  ΔRV  ≈  0.38  m/s  (Makarov  et  al.  2009)     •   In  general  the  ΔRV  can  be  larger   •   Spot  distribu=on  can  be  more  complex  
  9. 9. Granula)on   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Ac)ve  regions  suppress   granula)on  blueshiK    few  m/s  
  10. 10. Granula)on   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       • The  integrated  line  profile  is   distorted.   • The  ra=o  of  dark  lane  to  hot   cell  areas  changes  with  the   solar  cycle   RV  changes  can  be  as  large   as  10  m/s  with  an  11  year   period   It  mimics    a  Jupiter!  
  11. 11. Other  ac)vity  phenomena   Faculae that are not associated with spots ~ 50 m/s inflows towards active regions in the Sun (Gizon et al. 2001, 2010) ..   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  12. 12. RV  perturba)on  of  the  Sun   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Upper  panel:  RV  perturba=on  due  to  a  dark  spot  (solid  line);   dark  spot  with  an  associated  bright  plage  (do`ed);  and   macroturbulence  reduc=on  by  network  magne=c  field   (dashed);    Lower  panel:  the  corresponding  op=cal  flux   varia=ons  (Lanza  et  al.  2010).   Meunier  et  al.  (2010)  
  13. 13. A  stellar  radial  velocity  curve   (Data  from  GAPS  -­‐  HARPS-­‐N  @  TNG)   RMS  >  σrv     Interes)ng   candidate!   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  14. 14. Searching  for  the  period   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  15. 15. Fit  of  radial  velocity  curve   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  16. 16. Folding  with  the  best  period   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  17. 17. Ac)vity  diagnos)cs  from  spectra   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Ac)ve  star   Quiet  star   Ca  II  H  &  K  
  18. 18. Warning!   Strong  ac)vity  indicators   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  19. 19. How  to  disentangle  ac)vity  from   planets?  (rota)on  and  granula)on)   This  limb   produces   red  shiV   This  limb   produces   blue  shiV    T1  -­‐Cool  faint  spot   blushiVed    T2  -­‐Cool  faint  spot   redshiVed   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  20. 20. Effect  on  RV   Spots  and  stellar  winds  alter  spectral  line  shape   Spot   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  21. 21. Bisector  analysis  :  likely  ac)vity!   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  22. 22. Bisector  analysis  :  likely  ac)vity!   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       RESULT  CONFIRMED  BY  PHOTOMETRIC    LIGHT  CURVE  
  23. 23. NIR  spectroscopy   G.  Micela  (I)  -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  24. 24. G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       TW  Hydrae   HARPS  +  CORALIE   Huelamo  et  al.  2008  
  25. 25. Photometry   Photometric  data  is  needed  to  check  for  short-­‐ periodic  varia=on  due  to  stellar  spots  and  to   iden=fy  stellar  rota=on  period   Signals due to stellar spots are quasi-periodic and short-lived G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  26. 26. G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       An  example:  GJ   3998  (Affer  et  al,  subm)  
  27. 27. An  example:  GJ  3998  (Affer  et  al,  subm)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Phase  folded  V  and  B   curves  at  the  periods   P  =  30.75  days.   The  same  as  in  CaII  !   Photometric  data   from  EXORAP  project  
  28. 28. SpTy  =  M1   Tsp  =  3722±68   [Fe/H]  =  -­‐0.16  ±0.09   M*=  0.5  Msun   HARPS-­‐N:  some  results   A  planetary  system  around   GJ3998   (From  GAPS  programme,  Affer  et  al.  submi`ed)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Periods:  30.7,  42.5  days   Related  to  rota)on   Confirmed  by  photometry  and   CaII  line  analysis   Planet  1   Porb=  2.84979  days  (+0.00098,  -­‐  0.00092)   a  =  0.029  A.U.  (±0.001)   Mpsin(i)  =  2.46  Mearth  (+0.34,  -­‐0.32)   Planet  2   Porb=  13.741  days  (±0.020)   a  =  0.089  A.U.  (±0.003)   Mpsin(i)  =  6.12  Mearth  (+1,  -­‐0.95)  
  29. 29. Observing  strategy   •  Several  periods  to  be  well  sampled   – Amplitude  and  period  of  the  planet  are  stable   over  =me   – Stellar  spots  are  “short-­‐lived”  and  amplitude   changes   •  Several  exposures  in  one  night   – Short-­‐period  stellar  ac=vity  ji`er   – Rota=onal  period  from  ac=vity  indicators  (from   ~1  to  100  days)   •  Mul)band  observa)ons   P.  Weise  –  RV  survey  of  stars  with  circumstellar  disks   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  30. 30. Stellar  ac)vity  and  planetary  signal   G. Micela - Brave New Worlds
  31. 31. Transi)ng  planets   •  Also  transits  suffers  of  stellar  ac=vity.   •  “Luckily”  stellar  noise  is  colored     •  Planet  transits  are  stable  in  =me  and   independent  from  wavelenght!  Radius   •  Much  more  complex  for  atmospheric   observa=ons   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  32. 32. Ac)vity  proper)es  relevant    for     planetary  atmosphere  observa)ons   • Low  mass  stars  –  dF-­‐  dM  types  –  typical  atmospheric   targets   • Varia=ons  on  several  =me  scales:  flares,  stellar   rota=on,  ac=ve  region  evolu=on,  cycles   • Both  are  coloured  phenomena  –  Wavelength   dependence     • Surface  inhomogenei=es  !  dependence  on  transit   geometry   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  33. 33. Transit  detec)on  and  stellar  ac)vity   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Various  techniques:  Jenkins  (2002),  Aigrain  &  Irwin  (2004),  Moutou  et  al.  (2005),   Bonomo  et  al.  (2009),  Ofir  et  al.  (2010);   • Analysis  of  =mescales  and  shapes  of  ac=vity-­‐induced  varia=ons  ;   • Tuning  according  to  the  rota=on  period  and  level  of  ac=vity  of  the  star;   • The  informa=on  for  this  op=miza=on  can  be  derived  from  the  same  light  curve,  (e.g.,   Bonomo  et  al.  2009);   Corot  -­‐2b:  A  transi=ng  hot  Jupiter  around  an  ac=ve  dG7  star     (V=12.57,Prot=1.743,  Alonso  et  al.  2008,  Bouchy  et  al.  2008;  Lanza  et  al.  2009)    
  34. 34. Case  1):  Unocculted  spot     Flux  out  of  transit:   Fobs=Fstar .  (1-­‐f)  +Fspot  .  f   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  35. 35. Case  1):  Unocculted  spot   During  the  transit:   Fecl  =  Fstar   Fobs  <  Fecl,  ΔFobs=ΔFtrue   !  ΔF/Fecl  <  ΔF/Fobs     Out  of  transit:   Fobs=Fstar .  (1-­‐f)  +Fspot  .  f   Using  Fobs  we     overes.mate   the  planetary  radius   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  36. 36. Case  2):  Occulted  spot   During  the  transit  :   Fecl  =  Fstar   Fobs  <  Fecl  !   ΔF/Fecl  <  ΔF/Fobs     Out  of  transit:   Fobs=Fstar .  (1-­‐f)  +Fspot  .  f   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  37. 37. Case  2):  Occulted  spot   Out  of  transit:   Fobs=Fstar .  (1-­‐f)  +Fspot  .  f   During  the  transit  on  the  spot:   Fecl  =  Fspot   Fobs  >  Fecl  ,  ΔFobs  <    ΔFtrue   !  ΔFtrue/Fecl  >  ΔFobs/Fobs   Using  Fobs  we     underes.mate   the  planetary  radius   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  38. 38. Atmospheres:  Transmission  Spectroscopy     Rp= R Rp= R’ Rp= R’’ λ=λ1 λ=λ0 λ=λ2 G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  39. 39. Ac)vity  is  a  coloured  phenomenon   •  Tspot  <  Tstar   •  Spectrum  distor=on     Examples  of  four  stars  in  a     range  of  Teff  with  a  spot     coverage  f=  0.5,  ΔT=1250  K   (Ballerini  et  al.  2012)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  40. 40. Effects  on  planetary  observa)ons   •  During  a  transit  on  an  ac=ve  star  !     •  ΔFobs(λ1)/Fobs(λ1)  ≠ΔFobs(λ2)/Fobs(λ2)    !   •  ΔR(λ1)/R(λ1)  ≠ΔR(λ2)/R(λ2)     In  absence  of  a  planetary  atmosphere!!!   ACTIVITY  MIMICS  THE  PRESENCE  OF  AN   ATMOSPHERE   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  41. 41. The  unocculted  spot  case   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  42. 42. The  unocculted  spot  case:  spectra   •  Stellar  lines    sensi=ve  to  temperature   •  Depending  on     •  Stellar  temperature   •  Spot  temperature   •  Filling  factor   •  Different  effects  for  each  spectral  type   In  principle  we  may  correct  observing  spectral   regions  “free”  from  planetary  signal   Significant  effects  non  only  in  photometry  !  Spectral  features     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  43. 43. The  unocculted  spot  case:  spectra   Stars  +  Spot   •  T(star)  =  5000  K   •  T(spot)=  4500,  4000,  3500    K   •  T(star)  =  4000  K   •  T(spot)=  4000,  3500    K   f=0.01  (≥  f(sun)  )   (Fstar,  unsp-­‐Fstar,spot  )  /  Fstar,unsp   Some  examples  based  on  Phoenix  model  (Allard  et  al.  2009)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  44. 44. The  unocculted  spot  case:  spectra   Several  features   depending  on  Tspot   Level  flux  and  shape     in  the  op=cal  band    may     be  used  to  determine   the  size  of  effects  in  IR   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  45. 45. The  unocculted  spot  case:  spectra   •   At  later  spectral  types  even   more  features   • Spectrum  in  the  op=cal  band     is  ~flat.   • Low  spectral  resolu=on  in   the  visible  should  be   sufficient   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  46. 46. Some  considera)ons   •  Stellar  ac=vity  is  an  important  issue  ALSO  for  “quiet”   stars   •  Significant  misinterpreta=on  of  spectra  may  occur  if   ac=vity  is  not  taken  into  account     •  Broad  band  coverage  helps  significantly  in  correc=ng   for  ac=vity   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  47. 47. We  need  to  model  the  stellar  signal  if  we  want  to   recover  the  planetary  signal   Methods:     •  Time  series  analysis   •  Spectrum  analysis   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  48. 48. Spectral  approach   Objec)ve  :     Using  the  visible  spectrum  as  an  instantaneous   calibrator  to    correct  the  IR  spectrum  in  order  to   recover  the  planetary  signal  !  Large  band,     spectral  Resolu=on,  high  SNR   – Simplified  spo`ed  star  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  49. 49. Spectrum  analysis   Assump)ons:   – Stellar  ac=vity  is  due  to  the  presence  of  a  dominant   spot  at  T=Tspot  (with  Tspot  <  Tstar)  covering  a   frac=on  f  (filling  factor)  of  the  stellar  surface   – The  stellar  flux  in  presence  of  the  spot  can  be   expressed  as   Flux(spo`ed)  =  Flux(star)*(1-­‐f)  +  Flux(Tspot)*f   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  50. 50. Iden)fica)on  of  spectral  index   sensi)ve  to  stellar  ac)vity   Method:   "  For  each  spectral  type,  crea=on  of  a  grid  of  reference   spo`ed  stars,  varying  Tspot  and  filling  factor  (f).   "  Computa=on  of  Principal  Components  and   deriva=on  of  their  dependence  on  Tspot  and  f.   –  Rota=on  of  the  spectra  in  a  system  of  independent   variables     –  The  first  ones  explain  most  of  the  variance       –  We  may  describe  the  spectra  with  a  small  number  of   variables   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  51. 51. Method:   "  Simula=ons  of  “real”  stars   "  Projec=on  of  “real”  stars  on  the  Principal  Component   space  to  recover  Tspot  and  f.   "  Model  the  spectrum  using  the  derived  Tspot  and  f,   and  quan=fy  the  reduc=on  of  the  ac=vity  induced   effects  in  the  infrared.   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  52. 52. Results: Two  components  explain  more  the  90%  of   the  variance:  dependence  on  Tspot  and  f   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  53. 53. Col-­‐col  plane   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  54. 54. Results     1000  simulajons  assuming  R=300  and    min(S/N)   =200  per  resolujon  element  !  in  most  cases   we  recover  the  spot  configurajon  within   ΔTspot=100K  and  Δf=  0.001   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  55. 55. Results     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  56. 56. Results   •  A  correc=on  with   dTspot  <  100K   reduces   significantly  the   spectrum   distor=on.     Some  examples:   T(star)=6000K   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  57. 57. Results   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  58. 58. Results   •  The  spectral  approach  is  able  to  reduce   significantly  the  ac=vity  induced  spectrum   distor=on  within  the  adopted  assump=ons.   •  It  works  well  for  solar  type  stars   •  For  dM  stars  a  residual  distor=on  is  s=ll   present   Working  in  progress  in  prepara=on  of  dedicated   atmospheric  missions   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  59. 59. Other  bands:     High  Energy   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  60. 60. The  transit  of  Venus:    probing  the  high  planet  atmosphere   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015   Reale  et  al.  2015   Nat.  comm.   measuring  the   radius  in  different   bands  from  opjcal   to  X-­‐rays  
  61. 61. The  observa)ons   •  Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) –  Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA, pixels size 0.60000 arcsec) •  4500 A (78 images) •  1700A (114 images) •  1600 A (124 images) •  335 A (166 images) •  304 A (118 images) •  211 A  (117 images) •  193 A (119  images) •  171 A (120 images) •  Hinode –  X-Ray Telescope (XRT): (~10 A, pixel size 1.0286 arcsec) (102 images) AIA  4500A   AIA  335A   XRT   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  62. 62. 335   4500  Ang   335  Ang   Start: 5 June 2012 22:25 UTC End: 6 June 2012 04:16 UTC G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  63. 63. Descrip)on  of  the  analysis:     •  Measure of the radius for each image in each channel •  Determination of the best radius value in each channel as the mean value and its uncertainty as the standard deviation of the mean •  Comparison with models G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  64. 64. Venus  radius  vs  wavelength:     Wavelength[A]  Radius  [km]  Al=tude  [km]   –  4500                            6131±12.5            79  ±  12.5     –  1700                            6159±3            107±3     –  1600                            6179±3            127±3     –  335                                        6228±6            176±6     –  304                                        6219±4            167±4     –  211                                        6214±3            162±3     –  193                                  6217±4            165±4     –  171                              6216±4            164±4     –  10                              6202±6          150±6   •  Uncertainty:  3  σ   •  Assuming  the  radius  of  the  rocky  surface:  6052  km   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  65. 65. EUV  vs  op)cal  radius   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  66. 66. Venus  radius  vs  wavelength:     comparison  with  models  (Fox  2011)   SZA  95o   SZA  90o   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  67. 67. Results   •  High  energy  photons  are  absorbed  at  larger   al=tude  where  EUV  an  X-­‐rays  photoionize     molecules   •  Probe  al=tude  of  the  densest  ion  layers  of  Venus’s   ionosphere  (CO2  and  CO),   •  Probe  of    Venus  atmosphere  models  at  the   terminator   •  Transits  in  X-­‐rays  of  exoplanets  to  measure  upper   atmospheric  layers     •  A  pilot  study  for  Athena?   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  68. 68. Planets  may  modify     the  environment     Planets  may  affect  the  star!   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  69. 69. Star-­‐Planet  Magne)c  Interac)ons   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015   •  Star-­‐Planet  Magne)c  Interac)ons          Stellar  (dynamo-­‐generated)  magne=c  field  are  expected   to  interact  with  the  magnetospheres  of  close-­‐in  Jupiter-­‐ mass  planets   •  Magne=c  stresses  and  reconnec=on  events            ⇒   energy  release,  hea=ng  of  stellar  and  planetary   atmospheres,  enhanced  chromospheric  and  coronal   radia=on   •  Detec=on  of  these  effects                                                                                                  ⇒   characteriza=on  of  planetary  magnetospheres  ⇒   feedback  effects,  e.g.  hea=ng  and  evapora=on  of   planetary  atmospheres  
  70. 70. ❖ Strong  variability  aVer  the  planetary  eclipse  (phase  0.5)   ❖ Analysis  of  2012  X-­‐ray  flare  suggests  long  magne=c  structure,   40-­‐100  G  magne=c  field,  and  dense  plasma   XMM-­‐Newton  X-­‐ray  observa)ons  of  HD   189733     (PilliIeri  et  al.  2010,  2011,  2014)   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  71. 71. HST/COS  FUV  observa)ons  of     HD  189733   Pilli`eri  et  al.,  2015  ApJ   •  5  HST  orbits,  COS  spectra  1150-­‐1450  A   •  Strong  FUV  variability  aKer  phase  0.5   •  First  event:  red-­‐shiKed    lines,                            up  to  +20  ±  5   km/s   •  Second  event:  lines  blue-­‐shiKed    of              -­‐20  ±  5  km/ s  
  72. 72. Modeling  of  HD  189733  SPI:   the  planet  spoon-­‐feeding  its  star     Pilli`eri  et  al.,  2015  ApJ  in  press,  arxiv:1503.05590   MHD  simula=ons  by  Matsakos  et  al.  (2015)   ❖  Accre=on  of  material  from  the  planet,     ❖  Type  III:  strong  planetary  ou„low   ❖  Ac=ve  spot  on  stellar  surface  co-­‐moving  with  the  planet   ❖  Phased  variability    
  73. 73. New  test  case:  HD  17156b,    hot  Jupiter  in  highly  eccentric  orbit   •  Host  star  Sp  G0,  V=8.2,  M*  =  1.285±0.026  M⊙ R*  =  1.507±0.012  R⊙    Age=3.2  ±  0.3  Gyr   •  Transi)ng  planet  Mp  =  3.19±0.03  MJ,  Rp  =   1.087±0.007  MJ  (Nutzman  et  al.  2011),     •  Orbit  Porb  =  21.2  d,  e  =  0.677±0.003  ,  a  =  0.163   AU      i  =  86.57±0.06  
  74. 74. •  Periastron  7  hr  aVer   transit   •  XMM  obs  on  Sep  4:                 5  days  aVer  periastron   •  XMM  obs  on  Sep  20   started  ≈9  h  aVer   periastron,  dura=on   ∼10h   HD  17156b  orbit     G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  75. 75. SoK  X-­‐ray  images   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  76. 76. SoK  X-­‐ray  images   •  X-­‐ray  detec)on  (6.6σ  in  the  0.3  –  1.5  keV  band)  ONLY  at   periastron!  (Maggio  et  al.  2015  ApJ)   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  77. 77. SoK  X-­‐ray  images   •  Result  supported  by  Ca  I  H&K  chromospheric  emission   observed  by  HARPS-­‐N  (Maggio  et  al.  2015  ApJ)   G.  Micela  -­‐  Chian=  15-­‐17  Sept  2015  
  78. 78. •  High  energy  observa=ons  may  give  a  new  view   •  Effects  on  planets:  hea=ng,  chemical  effects,   evapora=on,  secondary  electrons…   •  Effects  on  stars:  enhanced  ac=vity   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      

×