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Death registration in emergency and conflict settings – a matter of law and life

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Presentation by Claire Brolan (Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto) at the international conference on innovations in Civil Registration and Vital Statistics (CRVS) systems - Ottawa on 27-28 February 2018. See more at http://crvsinnovations.net

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Death registration in emergency and conflict settings – a matter of law and life

  1. 1. Death registration in emergency and conflict settings – a matter of law and life Dr Claire E Brolan Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto CRVS/ESEC Innovations Conference, February 27-28 2018, Ottawa Harnessing the Power: CRVS Systems for 2030 Global Agenda Panel Session – Legal Framework & Protection of Identities Tuesday February 27, 2018
  2. 2. Acknowledgements
  3. 3. Content: 1. ‘The Disconnect’ between death registration and certification, and the importance of disaggregated mortality data from (cross-cutting) international law, rights, disaster displacement, and development agendas and discourse The Connect 2. Importance of death registration and disaggregated mortality data in emergency, conflict and disaster settings (preparedness, avoidance & response) 3. Importance for death registration and the production of disaggregated mortality data specifically in emergency, conflict and disaster settings to be grounded in legal and regulatory frameworks De jure challenges De facto challenges
  4. 4. 1. ‘The Disconnect’- Context  Siloed, sectoral approaches to CRVS & development (i.e. MDGs)  Longstanding focus on birth registration  CRVS in conflict and emergencies “a blindspot”  Death registration has not ordinarily been treated as an issue within the ambit of international human rights law
  5. 5. The Connect: How and why does death registration fall within the ambit of international human rights law?  Can facilitate the identification and securing of surviving kin’s access to nationality or residency (i.e. National ID cards, residency cards, passport and travel documentation, voting rights), property, business, and inheritance rights, and enhance their ability to claim life insurance, compensation and other social welfare entitlements (health, education, housing)  Civil, political, economic, social, cultural rights protection and promotion  Inversely, set the stage for lives of inequity, invisibility, injustice, marginalization, discrimination, poverty (inter-generational)  Civil, political, economic, social, cultural rights violations
  6. 6. Why and how does death registration fall within the ambit of international human rights law?  Lack of hard (disaggregated) data on the victims (the deceased, the survivors), the displaced, people on the move  Invisible populations, poor governance, lack of accountability & transparency, discrimination  Civil, political, economic, social, cultural rights violations Setel et al, The Lancet (2007): 1569-77.
  7. 7. Why and how does death registration fall within the ambit of international human rights law? Declaration from the First Meeting of Ministers & National Authorities in the Americas on the Right to Identity, Mexico, September 2016 “The need to implement an extensive national identity policy to promote accessibility to identity documents through the implementation of advanced CRVS systems, including simple, free cost, non-discriminatory procedures, safeguarding personal information, and respecting cultural diversity, gender and human rights” http://clarciev.com/site/wp- content/uploads/2016/11/Declaration_Identity-29Sep_2016_vf.pdf http://www.ohchr.org/Documents/Issues/HRIndicators/GuidanceNo teonApproachtoData.pdf OHCHR– A Human Rights Based Approach to Data (Guidance Note to Data Collection & Disaggregation, updated February 2016)
  8. 8. 2. Importance of death registration in emergency, conflict & disaster settings  By 2050 – between 25 million to 1 billion environmental migrants, moving either within countries or across borders on a permanent or temporary basis (IOM, 2018)  7.6 billion people in 2017 is expected to reach 8.6 billion in 2030, 9.8 billion in 2050 and 11.2 billion in 2100 (UN DESA, Population Division, 2017)
  9. 9. Importance of death registration in emergency, conflict & disaster settings • Public health metaphor • Human rights metaphor • Investment metaphor • Good governance metaphor • Sustainable development metaphor
  10. 10. Importance of death registration in emergency, conflict & disaster settings Sustainable development metaphor:
  11. 11. “A fundamental prerequisite of population health research is the ability to establish an accurate denominator and this in turn requires that every individual in the study population is counted” (Correa-Velez & Gifford, 2007, p.273) Global target A: Substantially reduce global disaster mortality by 2030, aiming to lower average per 100,000 global mortality between 2020-2030 compared with 2005-2015. • A-1 (Compound) Number of deaths and missing persons attributed to disasters, per 100,000 population • A-2 Number of deaths attributed to disasters, per 100,000 population • A-3 Number of missing persons attributed to disasters, per 100,000 population
  12. 12. “What gets measured gets done”
  13. 13. 3. Death registration and the production of disaggregated mortality data specifically for preparing, avoiding, and responding to emergency, conflict and disaster settings should be grounded in legal and regulatory frameworks at the national & sub-national level
  14. 14. De jure challenges:
  15. 15. De facto challenges: Communities Governance Technical/ economic

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