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InMete 55+ curricullum intermediate

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InMete 55+ curricullum intermediate

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InMete 55+ curricullum intermediate

  1. 1.  English Language Curriculum Intermediate level Published by the partners of the “Innovative methods for increasing effectiveness of teaching English of 55+ learners” Project Erasmus+ Project, Key Action 2 – Strategic Partnerships
  2. 2.  Contributing authors: Teresa Anelli (Italy), Beatrix Bajnóczi (Hungary), Agnieszka Baran (Poland), Gyöngyi Bódiné Gál (Hungary), Andrea Ciantar (Italy), Loredana Golob (Italy), Manuela Gazzano (Italy), Kirsi Haavisto (Hungary), Barbara Kaszkur-Niechwiej (Poland), Anna Payne (Poland), Malwina Szeliga (Poland), adult learners taking part in the project. Project logo designer: Andrea Sinka (Hungary) Kraków (Poland), Rome (Italy), Szeged (Hungary), 2014-2016
  3. 3. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 3 Table of contents Introduction – The InMETE 55+ Project .................................................. 5 The Project Partners .................................................................................. 7 General Tips for Teachers .......................................................................... 9 Our Curricula ............................................................................................ 13 Our Approach …………………………………………………………............ 15 Objectives …………………………………………………………….............. 19 Techniques and Activities ........................................................................ 21 Materials and Equipment ......................................................................... 25 Testing and evaluation ............................................................................. 27 Contents .................................................................................................... 29 Summary .................................................................................................... 33
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  5. 5. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 5 Introduction – The InMETE 55+ Project Teaching foreign languages, especially English, to seniors, is becoming one of the most crucial elements of education in later-life in Europe. Existing analysis concerns mainly the needs and current state, but there are not enough didactic materials which would support teachers in their daily work with learners 55+. This concerns in particular those materials that go beyond the traditional language course, and include such elements that are emotionally engaging, motivating, and provide new incentives: mental, physical and sensory - so essential in later-life pedagogy. To address this deficiency a partnership was formed which consists of 3 organizations from Poland, Hungary and Italy, possessing considerable experience in senior education, especially in language teaching and represent a complementary approach, including academic. This has enabled the partners to identify the most urgent needs and gaps in language teaching (especially English) to older learners and to propose innovative solutions to address them. The Fullness-of-Life Academy Association from Krakow, the Courses Educational and Cultural Association from Szeged and the Italian Federation for Continuing Education from Rome gathered together to realize the Erasmus + Project “Innovative methods for increasing effectiveness of teaching English of 55+ learners” (InMETE 55+). The project has a form of “Strategic Partnership”, done under the Key Action 2 from September 2014 to August 2016. The project goal is to develop tangible propositions of innovative methods for increasing effectiveness of teaching English to 55+ learners. Through well-structured cooperation, researches, discussions, international meetings, three tangible intellectual outputs of the project be prepared:
  6. 6. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 6 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. a. resource pack of possible resources: materials, ideas and guidelines which could be used during the English lessons to increase cognitive functions of elderly learners, in particular, their attention, motivation, emotional involvement, memory functioning, senses and body involvement, communication sensitivity and capability, and also their well-being; b. nine detailed lesson outlines together with teaching/learning materials for teachers and students (each for two levels: elementary (A2-B1) and intermediate (B2) including innovative elements taken from external sources like art, historical heritage of our countries, memory rules and methods, music, poetry, body expression and para-theatrical forms, etc.; c. two curricula for a one-year (60 hrs) course for learners 55+, two levels - elementary (A2-B1) and intermediate (B2). These three products will be available free of charge for seniors’ educators from the non-profit sector. At the end of the project, during dissemination events, all of them will be promoted. In this publication we present the third product – curriculum for courses for seniors, where we present a detailed list of possible techniques, activities and materials that can be used by the teacher as well as a detailed list of grammar, vocabulary, skills and functional language issues to be chosen from and covered. We hope it will be used by teachers as a base and inspiration for their classes.
  7. 7. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 7 The Project Partners The partnership consists of 3 partners from Poland, Hungary and Italy, who possess considerable experience in senior education, especially in language teaching and represent a complementary approach, including academic. Poland: Stowarzyszenie Akademia Pełni Życia im. Joanny Boehnert The Fullness-Of-Life Academy Association has been working since 2001 with seniors from the Malopolska region of Poland - both from big cities and small towns. The goal has been to improve the quality of older people's life by creating a wide range of educational opportunities for them. Special emphasis is put on giving seniors access to modern computer technology, language learning and the achievements of contemporary science and culture. The Association organises computer courses, language classes, lectures, seminars, memory training, art workshops, and discussion and hobby groups. It also develops teaching/study materials tailored to older people. It carries out innovative educational projects for older people, both locally and internationally. Web page: www.apz.org.pl
  8. 8. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 8 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Hungary: Tan-Folyam Oktatási és Kulturális Egyesület The Courses Educational and Cultural Association was founded by adult learners. Its main aims are to promote formal, non-formal and informal lifelong learning and to achieve and maintain mental, physical and social well-being through active learning. It organises and conducts various training workshops and projects related to lifelong learning, for example in language and ICT. The majority of members of the Association are older people and the development of teaching and learning techniques and applications appropriate to the age group is a central interest. Web page: www.tan-folyam.eu Italy: Unione Italiana di Educazione Deglt Adulti (UNIEDA) The Italian Federation for Continuing Education is a national umbrella organisation of 65 Italian adult education organisations. It is a national focal point for the development of an inter-generational pedagogy aimed at different generations and cultures in the name of their common educational needs. As a research and experimentation centre for adult education activities and methodologies, UNIEDA is particularly active in the promotion and dissemination of autobiographical and biographical narrative methodologies and explores their relationship with the memory and learning of older people. It participates in the implementation and dissemination of European Grundtvig projects at national and transnational level and, in 2010, developed for use a model bill on Lifelong Learning, which was regarded as strategic for the achievement of Lisbon objectives and aims. Web page: www.unieda.it
  9. 9. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 9 General Tips for Teachers At the beginning of a course the learners can fill in a questionnaire about the most common problems in learning English. Typical problems which will emerge are: speaking, oral comprehension, irregular verbs, present perfect/past simple, present perfect simple/continuous, future, phrasal verbs, idioms. The result of the questionnaire is important for teachers because they can develop the course by taking into account their students’ necessities. Teachers shouldn’t correct 100% of their students’ mistakes especially during conversation activities and at low levels. Excessive correction could result in the students’ refusal to speak. A good option is to write down the students’ mistakes without interrupting them and to correct them only at the end of the activity. Don’t forget to praise your students for their progress. Some students in particular are very shy and they need to be encouraged. A good way to correct compositions and essays written by students is the “collective correction”: the teacher selects (among the students’ texts) the sentences with the worst (and most interesting!) mistakes and writes them on the board without mentioning the author. In turn the students have to spot the mistake and correct it. Encourage students to use traditional dictionaries and not digital ones. The “effort” of looking up a word helps students fix it in their memory more than a simple click on their pc.
  10. 10. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 10 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Adult-students are not just people who are learning a language; the teacher should valorise their personal experiences and background. If they want to share and compare their personal experiences, the teachers should encourage them. Make sure that the material is presented in a suitable way: for example well printed, in fonts which are not too small. Make sure the equipment works properly. For example if you play a song, the quality of the sound must be perfect and the room must not be noisy. If students do not understand a song or a listening exercise, they could be discouraged even if it’s not totally their fault. Don’t use materials (readings, listening, grammar exercises) too difficult for the students’ level. It could result in a general lack of confidence in the class. In general the teacher should motivate the students not to use their mother tongue in class, or to do this to the smallest degree possible. Anyway, at elementary levels, use the students’ language if necessary to make them feel comfortable, especially during the very first lessons when they don’t know the teacher and the other students, and their tension could compromise their understanding.
  11. 11. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 11 In the case of oral activities where every student has to describe something (a holiday, a story, a film) encourage the others to ask their classmate at least one question on the presentation s/he has just given. It will oblige everybody to listen carefully to the presentations. Create an informal relaxed atmosphere. If possible, put the tables in a circle so that everybody can look at each other. Enjoying ourselves is the best way to learn. Sometimes divide the students in teams and organize contests. They increase motivation and let learners socialize.
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  13. 13. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 13 Our Curricula In our project we prepared propositions for two curricula for a one-year (60 hrs) course for learners 55+, two levels – elementary (A2-B1) and intermediate (B2). Our intention was to prepare a rich document that can be used by teachers as a base and inspiration for their classes. Therefore one can find a detailed list of possible techniques, activities and materials that can be used by the teacher as well as a detailed list of grammar, vocabulary, skills and functional language issues to be chosen from and covered. The content of curricula topics also gives them a European value (recipes, tourism, cultural issues). Our experience shows clearly that each senior class is different not only in language level but also in age, life experience, motivation, capabilities and powers, which makes it necessary to tailor the teaching- learning process precisely for the indicated class and students. To use our curriculum in the most efficient way as a base for the teaching-learning process we encourage teachers first of all to get to know the whole curriculum document and reflect on it having in mind the class that they need the curriculum to be used for, to diagnose strong points, weaknesses and possible educational resources of the students. The teacher is not obliged to cover all the topic/structures/grammar proposed but needs to decide what elements of curricula are the most welcome and needed in his class and apply that in creating a new and innovative teaching plan that is tailored to the needs of students. Teachers are free to change the order of curriculum elements or to dedicate more or less time to elements depending on the requests and needs of the class. Moreover they need to be ready to implement any changes necessary according to the flexible, unpredictable needs, dispositions and expectations of the class over the one-year course. Teachers must also be ready to sit among their students and to pretend to be one of them if necessary.
  14. 14. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 14 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. We insist on the fact that the teacher in adult education is more than a guide. They are facilitators who have to encourage a joy of learning and motivation among the students. They must encourage creativity while remaining full of enthusiasm, but at the same time they need to be good listeners. 55+ learners often want to talk about their problems, life experience and current situation and share all these pieces of news with the rest of the class. It is a brilliant opportunity for a good teacher to fit these elements into the lesson and use them as a part of educational process. While working on our project, we focused on increasing attention, motivation, emotional involvement, memory functioning, senses and body involvement, communication sensitivity and capability, and well-being of senior students. We employed external sources like art, historical heritage, memory rules and methods, music, poetry, body expression and para-theatrical forms, and we tried to integrate culture in the lessons. We hope that these curricula will provide a helpful and useful tool for the teachers working in adult education area, and also that they will become an integral part of their teaching-learning process. We wish you all the best in your teaching career, stay inventive, and never stop learning.
  15. 15. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 15 Our Approach We feel it is important to understand that teaching students over fifty-five is a unique teacher/student environment not purely focused on the teaching-learning process but broadened into a friendlier experience intended to make students feel welcome, comfortable and part of the social life of the school. Taking part in our courses should promote students’ spiritual, social and cultural development, and should equip them with the necessary tools to understand, communicate and interact with other people with newfound confidence. Teachers are expected to be flexible and creative in tailoring their approach towards the life experiences of our students as well as their individual expectations and needs. Lessons should be designed to encourage emotional well-being while students discover their hidden potential, new abilities and expanded possibilities for the future. Our experience has helped us to identify some efficient approaches that we encourage you to practice such as demonstrative tasks, helping learners to forget negative educational experiences, using scaffolding techniques, balancing variety in activities, challenging learners with specific activities, helping learners recognize and acknowledge their own progress. Knowing Our Students It is fundamentally important to recognise and understand that 55+ students bring a lifetime of experiences with them when they join our courses. Our students come to us with a huge diversity of life experience, education and employment history, and instead of ignoring this in favour of a purely academic approach to teaching, we rather seek to appreciate, validate and include this diversity by allowing and encouraging students to be co-creators in their learning experience, making lessons more engaging and inclusive for all concerned.
  16. 16. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 16 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. It is our experience that seniors make reliable students, are motivated and keen to learn and absorb knowledge well. However, it should be very clearly realised that they may come to us with different levels of confidence, sensitivity and aptitude, and though possessing great enthusiasm and potential are nevertheless sometimes slowed or hampered by low self-esteem and insecurities. They may find learning stressful from prior experience or they may find it a pleasure to be back among school friends and textbooks, and it is up to our teachers to recognise any differences of approach needed in this regard, acting without prejudice, condescension, or neglect. Our 55+ students have specific needs. It is extremely important to face learning situations that are immediately applicable to real-life contexts, and that is the reason why they particularly enjoy tasks like buying tickets, booking hotel rooms, or asking for directions. They are also very good at linking new and old knowledge, so their life experience can be an increasingly rich resource for learning that teachers should consider when designing course materials. Most adult learners like the idea of attending a course and belonging to a community whose members have the same goals and interests, so the process of learning must be made fun and a pleasurable experience. Motivation is hardly a problem in courses for 55+ learners because they can be described as self-motivated learners with specific goals. They may want to make new friends, find company, relieve boredom, have a break from the routine of their everyday life, keep in contact with family members working abroad. We think that using authentic materials that are adapted to suit the age, interest, and language proficiency level of the learners is very valuable. For example, even beginners enjoy watching short excerpts taken from films or TV shows and can focus on some cultural conventions like greetings, asking for information, or buying tickets.
  17. 17. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 17 They may also be asked to concentrate on non-verbal behaviours too, for example, gestures or how people relate to each other, and then discuss how these behaviours are similar or different compared to their native culture. Many of the activities require learners to look for cultural similarities and differences in comparison with their own culture and serve as a basis for successful intercultural communication. Learners can develop their cultural awareness, which helps them broaden their minds, that is, increases tolerance as well as acceptance, and also strengthens their cultural sensitivity. Photo by APZ © 2016 Knowing Our Teachers To be a good teacher of 55+ students, first of all you have to be aware of the specific role that you are being asked to play. You will not just be called upon for your academic skills but you may also be put in the position of being an important addition to the lives of our students. Therefore, it is vital that teachers are not only passionate, motivated and enthusiastic, but also sensitive and empathic, flexible and intuitive to the individual needs of each student. The teachers should be awake to and aware of the strengths and weaknesses of the students, their skills, potentials and possibilities,
  18. 18. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 18 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. with a view to navigating each lesson using the temperaments and experiences of each student as possible additional material. They should be prepared to lead students occasionally, allowing them to ‘co-author’ the lesson to some degree, to encourage confidence and to create a relaxed environment for sharing. Teachers should never forget the value of praise either. If a student can finish the lesson with some sense of accomplishment or achievement, and have it vocalised and legitimised by a teacher who has obviously listened and been attentive to the class, the student gains much more than just a pat on the back. Overall, teachers should be kind, caring and considerate, but also firm and confidently able to balance out the rich variety of different temperaments and personalities of our students, so that each may learn without frustration and feel they have contributed equally during the lesson. It is a challenge to be a good teacher of 55+ learners. To achieve it, the teacher needs to know the characteristics, needs and styles of the learners; to be aware of efficient methods to foster learning, to understand and create optimal conditions and environment for learning; to develop materials tailored to the specific needs of learners; to use positive reinforcement; to integrate new information with previous experience; to make sure that the information is relevant; and be able to illustrate new ideas, concepts, topics. In terms of the everyday experiences of the learners, whenever possible, the teacher needs to relate the material to the lives of the learners, appeal to the personal interests of the learners, and make the classes as attractive as possible using illustrations, graphics, music, It is also imperative to relate every lesson as much as possible to former lessons and the experiences of the learners, excite the learners’ interest in the topic/material through statement of inquiry or thought provoking questions, and allow learners enough time to digest information and gain understanding.
  19. 19. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 19 Objectives Our courses should enable students to respond positively to challenges and opportunities, give students opportunities to be creative and to recognise the importance of employing their life experience into the teaching/learning process, be a very satisfying experience and be seen as an important and valuable achievement, meet the needs and interests of learners, provide a balance of intellectual application and fun, encourage students’ newfound potentials and creativity, build students’ confidence, inspire new interests and new experiences, broaden students’ awareness of European and world culture, making future travel more enjoyable and enabling them to communicate with family (esp. grandchildren) and friends living abroad, actively de-construct and eliminate age related prejudices and stereotyping of seniors in favour of instilling a greater sense of personal value and self-worth. Our teaching process should be designed to develop a joy of learning. It should encourage students to put effort into intellectual work and should stimulate the best positive progress. The course should not just be seen as a possibility of learning a new foreign language (memorizing new vocabulary, grammar and the attainment of new skills) but should also be an invitation to social interaction with the teacher and fellow students while actively engaged in intellectual pursuit.
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  21. 21. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 21 Techniques and Activities Speaking language repetition guided and open dialogue interviews telephone /Skype conversations simulation problem solving activities reporting story-telling descriptions brainstorming improvisation taking down notes discussion drama/role playing presentations communication strategies repetition drilling information exchanging
  22. 22. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level 22 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Listening comprehension questions gap filling exercises true/false exercises multiple choice exercises grid filling note-taking re-ordering items/information transcoding dictation Reading comprehension questions gap filling exercises true/false exercises multiple choice exercises grid filling note-taking re-ordering items/information transcoding dictation skimming/scanning activities interpretation
  23. 23. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 23 Writing guided and open dialogue questions/answers sentence completion letters/emails messages essays stories paragraph/sentence re-ordering guided compositions free compositions summary report commentary interpretation taking down notes presentations diary Grammar and vocabulary transformation multiple choice gap filling sentence building error correction matching structures with functions
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  25. 25. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 25 Materials and Equipment CD/DVD players CDs/DVDs projector texts newspapers magazines novels/short stories poems dictionaries flash cards pictures photos posters songs and lyrics pieces of music art pictures films/videos websites internet articles board games presentations other authentic materials (adverts, brochures etc.) other arts and humanities reference sources
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  27. 27. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 27 Testing and evaluation It should come as a relief to both a prospective student and a teacher that academic testing and evaluation, in the conventional sense, play a minor role in our curriculum. There are no separate written tests or oral examinations and any evaluation of students should be done in situ over the duration of a lesson and at the teacher’s discretion. However, this is not to say that evaluation plays no part at all. Our teachers should be sensitive to the momentum and flow of each individual lesson, being specifically aware of the contribution each student makes. Correction of spoken mistakes is important, but should be balanced with the general flow of conversation, meaning that it is often better to focus on the more obvious and perhaps more embarrassing errors, letting less important mistakes pass uncriticised, to keep the student’s train of thought flowing at pace with their intention to express themselves. Grammar is the most daunting thing in learning and speaking any language, and a good approximation at sentence structure can be worked with more easily than a confused and perhaps overly corrected attempt. And lastly, testing can be comfortably integrated in lessons through the imaginative and creative use of quizzes and games, giving the teacher an immediate sense of the ability and potential of each student, and of what may need to be added or taken away from future lesson plans. Rather than passing exams and gaining grades, our students in a very real sense need to be speaking as soon as they are able to, and so a purely academic approach will tend to hinder more than help. What is really needed, is an ability to communicate and express themselves within the context of their lives. An appreciation of this should lead to greater simplification and speed up the whole process.
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  29. 29. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 29 Contents Grammar like + (verb + ing) countable/uncountable nouns pronouns prepositions past simple tense past continuous tense narrative tenses have to be going to (predictions) adverbs
  30. 30. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers 30 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. present perfect tense present perfect tense vs past simple tense quantifiers gerund or to + infinitive question tags, short answers used to make, let, allow to + infinitive can/could/be able to (ability and possibility) will/going to/ present continuous tense (future forms) first conditional modals of obligation : must, have to, should articles comparatives and superlatives reported speech phrasal verbs Vocabulary animals appearance cars and driving celebrations clothes cooking eating out education free time friendship
  31. 31. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 31 holidays hotel flats, houses and furniture health and illnesses personality sport tourism travel types of books, films, TV programmes traffic and transport weather work and housework Skills listen and speak: talking about likes and dislikes listen and speak: talking about cars/driving/traffic listen and speak: describing a famous person listen and speak: in the restaurant read and write: eating habits read and write: describing a place you live read and write: describing education read and write: health listen and write: plans for holiday listen and write: my everyday duties listen and write: favourite books, films, TV programmes listen and speak: describing a person you admire
  32. 32. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers 32 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. Functional language asking personal questions talking about personal experiences ordering in the restaurant describing people and objects describing the place you live making travel arrangements making offers and suggestions refusing expressing feelings asking for directions/giving directions talking about obligations talking about plans making predictions stating opinions making polite requests offering help making arrangements shopping asking for an explanation making a complaint
  33. 33. English Language Curriculum - Intermediate level This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. 33 Summary In our publication we are presenting some materials for English language teachers working with seniors. They are several products that are the result of the cooperation of three organisations from Poland, Italy and Hungary over the past two years. The materials we are handing in are a joined effort of very experienced educators who have been taking part in senior and adult education for years and decided to share their experience and knowledge through preparing materials that can be useful for other educators and teachers. Photos by Agnieszka Baran © 2014 Cooperation in our project In Mete55+ was for all of us a very rewarding experience. In the work on our products not only English language teachers who are experts in the field of adult education but also our senior students were involved. They took part in the lessons based on materials that we are presenting. They gave us their feedback, and shared their opinions, suggestions and ideas. The involvement of direct receivers of our publications in the process of creating them is a guarantee of the high quality of the materials and their attractiveness. Finally, we would like to share with you the reflections on the project and publications that our senior learners and the most involved teachers have had.
  34. 34. Resource-pack of materials, ideas and guidelines for English teachers 34 This project has been funded with support from the European Commission. This publication reflects the views only of the author, and the Commission cannot be held responsible for any use which may be made of the information contained therein. “I liked the discussion activities where we could practise both words and expressions, and grammatical structures too. The context was really interesting too.” Hungary “The lessons were all really interesting though sometimes even a big challenge for me. I like acting out situations, so I especially liked the tasks where I had to be creative and improvise. “ Hungary “I am a teacher myself and I can see how important your project is. It is good to find out about new ideas and new materials, well done!!” Poland “I had the chance to know better my class- mates.” Italy “Seniors have a lot of experience and a lot of passion to learn. I wanted to learn English all my life, but I never had an opportunity. Now I travel a lot and I need English more than before. I support all ideas that are making English more achievable to seniors.” Poland “After this activity I learned an incredible number of words and verbs. We should repeat it with other topics. You learn while you play, and I think that when you are relaxed and without stress you learn better.” Italy “I like that teachers and educators from different countries exchange experience in the project - I think that in many other areas a policy like that would be very fruitful. It's good to talk, discuss and share opinions, and I see that you do a lot of that in the project. I like it a lot.” Poland “It was very funny to work in teams like in a competition. At the beginning I thought I didn't know any words but then I discovered I knew many of them!” Italy “Most of the tasks were quite new to me and I enjoyed them very much. The topics were inspiring and made everybody actively participate in the discussions.” Hungary “I think that it is fantastic that learning English became an international issue, and that different teachers from different countries work together to improve teaching that language. I can't wait for the final products.” Poland “I found your project very inspiring - your work looks very creative. I have my fingers crossed for the final result.” Poland “It was very original. I couldn't imagine that we could do that during our English lesson.” Italy “English language is so important nowadays, I can find it everywhere I go. In shops, at the station, at the airport, in my computer - everywhere! So I need to learn, and I need teachers that know how to teach me.” Poland

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