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DBI World Conference 2019 - Touching the sound

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DBI World Conference 2019
Accessibility stream: Concurrent session 2C
Presenter: Amy Di Nino
Topic: Touching the sound

Published in: Healthcare
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DBI World Conference 2019 - Touching the sound

  1. 1. TOUCHING THE SOUND
  2. 2. KALANI MUSIC VIDEO • https://youtu.be/gn6E9GAe-7s
  3. 3. WHAT IS MUSIC THERAPY? • Music therapists must have a bachelor’s degree or higher in music therapy from one of Canada’s college or universities, including 1200 hours of clinical training • Music therapists must hold the MTA credential, issued through the Certification Board for Music Therapists, which protects the public by ensuring competent practice and requiring continuing education • Music Therapy is an evidence-based health profession with a strong research foundation • Music Therapy degrees require knowledge in psychology, medicine, and music
  4. 4. GABBY GIFFORD VIDEO https://youtu.be/tiJ9X_wLSWM?t=1m48s
  5. 5. HOW DO WE HEAR MUSIC? • Sound is produced when something vibrates • Sound waves don’t just travel in air: they travel through whatever they encounter, including your body • Low frequencies/pitches are thicker than higher frequencies/pitches • That difference affects the way you feel the music because with a low note, your body spends a relatively long time actually inside the layers of low and high pressure • The waves of a high note travel through your body as well, but they oscillate so quickly between high pressure and low pressure that on the average you don’t feel any real pressure change
  6. 6. PROCESSING SOUNDS • SENSITIVITY (awareness) • DISCRIMINATION (Quality) • RECOGNITION (Consonance sounds) • COMPREHENSION (Interpretation)
  7. 7. AUDITORY CORTEX • A 2016 study found no significant difference in the auditory cortex– the part of the brain which processes sound – in hearing people and profoundly deaf people • Researchers took MRI scans of the brain of profoundly deaf people and hearing people whilst they played some high frequency and some low frequency sounds • The scans were then studied to see which regions of the auditory cortex were activated in each case • The researchers compared the scans and found there to be no significant differences were found in the auditory cortex between those of the hearing people and the profoundly deaf people
  8. 8. ENTRAINMENT • Defined by a temporal locking process in which one system’s motion or signal frequency entrains the frequency of another system • This process is a universal phenomenon that can be observed in physical (e.g., pendulum clocks) and biological systems (e.g., fire flies) • Entrainment can also be observed between human sensory, cognitive, and motor systems. • Rhythmic entrainment • Melodic entrainment
  9. 9. MT INTERVENTIONS WITH DEAFBLIND INDIVIDUALS EVERY PERSON IN THE ROOM COMES WITH AN INNATE MUSICALITY
  10. 10. PLAYING INSTRUMENTS • Improves fine and gross motor coordination • Helps develop self- reliance, self-esteem, and self-discipline • Enhances social interactions • Provides an immediate success experience
  11. 11. MUSIC IMPROVISATION • Verbal and non-verbal self-expression • Promotes and further develops creativity and individual thought • Provides an opportunity to make choices and work with structure in a creative way • Offers a non-verbal social experience by practicing leadership and turn-taking skills
  12. 12. SINGING/VOCALIZING • Aids with speech impairments, improve articulation, rhythm, and breath control • Communication • Form of self- expression
  13. 13. MT GOAL AREAS WITH DEAFBLIND INDIVIDUALS EXAMPLES
  14. 14. MT GOALS •Cognitive •Motor skills •Social •Speech/Verbalizing/Vocalizing •Behaviour skills •Emotional skills •Leisure skills
  15. 15. EXPRESSIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS • Research shows music and techniques used in music therapy have been used to elicit communication from deafblind individuals
  16. 16. WHAT ARE MOTIVATORS FOR COMMUNICATION? • Anticipation - to understand his or her environment and the world around them • Curiosity – experiences that spark something internally that communicates the desire to further understand what they have just felt/seen/heard • Imitation – communicate with others by imitating actions of those with how he or she interacts • Music (unaided or aided) – fluid and/or intentional repetitive movement to demonstrate recognition of rhythm or flow of the music and the use of voice or instrument to create sounds with varied duration, contour, pitches, and harmonies
  17. 17. DRUM COMMUNICATION!

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