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DBI World Conference 2019 - Meditation and haptics

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DBI World Conference 2019
Technology stream: Concurrent session 11A
Presenter: Melissa Evans
Topic: Meditation and haptics

Published in: Healthcare
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DBI World Conference 2019 - Meditation and haptics

  1. 1. Meditation and Haptics Melissa Evans Deafblind Consultant and Senior Physiotherapist Western Australia
  2. 2. Acknowledgement I respectfully acknowledge the Yugambeh People, the traditional owners of the land on which we meet, and pay my respect to their elders past, present and future
  3. 3. Aim of the Training Package “For most people, technology makes things easier. For people with disabilities, technology makes things possible.” Mary Pat Radabaugh Technology played an important role in the promotion and delivery of an accessible, virtual training option for the Western Australian Deafblind Community
  4. 4. Aim of the Workshop To provide the deafblind community members with access to trial alternative activities in an accessible and supported environment To provide accessible and specific training to commguides, volunteers and deafblind community members prior to the activity Provide support and encourage the deafblind community members who want to pursue this activity further to access community-based settings and to apply the strategies presented in the workshop
  5. 5. Why is the Workshop Needed? Limited access to an accessible and successful trial of a community- based group/activity Mental Health issues experienced by a high percentage of individuals living with deafblindness Coping Strategies that may be incorporated into everyday lives
  6. 6. Motivation “the same everyday problems as the wider world but they are compounded/multiplied by my deafblindness ... Deafblind people have to fight harder than most” LF
  7. 7. Why Breathing Meditation? Focus Ability to relax Self Awareness Self Control Emotional Health Physical Health
  8. 8. Why Haptics? Touch gives a sense of presence Haptic feedback makes action possible Touch is essential to emotional connection and wellbeing The sense of touch is astonishingly acute Haptics provides additional, tactile communication Haptics can be used on any body part that the individual chooses Touch is less likely to directly affect the meditation process
  9. 9. Training Video Reference Group Deafblind community members Deafblind Consultants Meditation practitioner Qualified Social Haptics trainer Psychologist with deafblind experience
  10. 10. The Meditation Script Terminology specific language Easy haptices – e.g. hold, count Explanations provided difficult concepts – “witness or watcher of the mind” Location of the haptices chosen – e.g. the shoulder rather than the head, temple or face
  11. 11. Activity - Breathing In and Out Think about what haptices you would choose to represent breathing in and breathing out Discuss this with another person near you Trial the haptic methods chosen Review – did they convey the correct message? Discuss with the group
  12. 12. Training Video Viewing Options Designed to be available electronically to all commguides, volunteers and deafblind community members in an accessible format via: Dropbox Email YouTube Facebook Messenger To enable the deafblind community member to receive support and experience of the haptices from their support person prior to the workshop
  13. 13. Training Video
  14. 14. Meditation Workshop Day Environmental considerations: Lighting Temperature Comfort Communication needs: One or two support people View of the interpreter Residual hearing Haptics preferences: Ability to change and modify to suit the experience
  15. 15. Images from the Day 1 Description – a brightly lit, large room with people sitting in chairs and also, sitting and lying on mats or cushions on the ground. Positioned in front of the group is a seated meditation practitioner and an Auslan interpreter is standing beside her.
  16. 16. Images from the Day 2 Description – a brightly lit, large room viewed from the back, forward - with people sitting in chairs and also, sitting and lying on mats or cushions on the ground. One person in the foreground can be seen placing her right hand on the right shoulder of another person sitting beside her.
  17. 17. Images from the Day 3 Description – a brightly lit, large room with people sitting in chairs and also, sitting and lying on mats or cushions on the ground. Most of the group are positioned in pairs - with one person of each pair applying haptics on the arm, back or leg of another person.
  18. 18. Images from the Day 4 Description – a gently lit area within the larger room - taken from a side view. The majority of people are lying down for meditation, however, there are some people on chairs and in the distance an Auslan interpreter is standing up.
  19. 19. Videos from the Day 1 Description - video of a woman lying on a mat. A second woman is sitting at her side. The second woman is using haptics. She is using her right hand to demonstrate deep breathing by running her had from the first woman’s shoulder down to her elbow indicating a breath in, pausing with a fist, and moving back towards the shoulder for breathing out.
  20. 20. Videos from the Day 2Description – a captioned video viewing the whole meditation room performing a breathing meditation cycle. There are pairs of people sitting in chairs and on mats, there are also people lying on mats on the floor. Out in front of the group is the meditation practitioner (speaking and sitting), an Auslan interpreter (signing and standing) and a support person demonstrating the haptics (standing).
  21. 21. Videos from the Day 3 Description – a captioned video viewing the meditation room participants performing a breathing meditation cycle. There are pairs of people sitting in chairs and on mats, there are also people lying on mats on the floor. The haptics demonstrated are being applied to the arms and backs of the participants.
  22. 22. Outcomes and Feedback 1 Training Video The video was distributed via online platforms that are widely available to the commguides, supports and the deafblind community members Achieved success in up-skilling a large number of persons with different accessibility needs in the use of haptics Prior practise limits for some Future: Accessibility training and experience Possible future Webinar style
  23. 23. Outcomes and Feedback 2 Meditation Workshop Positive response by all participants on the use of haptics. Participants acknowledged the pre-planning and training aspects However, some participants also described: Difficulty relaxing Emotional distress and visions Important to identify any issues arising from the activity workshop that require additional intervention
  24. 24. Technology Technology is challenging the traditional ways we live and work But while technology continues to advance, there are still significant barriers to training access and usage for people with disability Multiple platforms on existing devices The use of technology and social platforms in this instant, enabled our deafblind community members the opportunity to achieve a successful trial of breathing meditation
  25. 25. Video Production Thanks Wilma Brass – Deafblind Advocate living with Usher Syndrome Claire Belton – Meditation Practitioner Michael Paul Evans – Videographer and Editor Karen Wickham and Meredith Prain – Deafblind Consultants Senses Australia
  26. 26. Question Time ☺ ? melissa.evans@senses.org.au Busselton, WA – 4500km (2800miles)

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