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The Path to Suffrage
Women’s Suffrage in the New Settlements
Starter And Objective
• Starter: Describe how organizers of the Seneca Falls Convention could
get their message to women l...
Map Skills Review
• What is the most frequently used word on this 1850 U. S. map?
• http://sites.rootsweb.com/~mnwabbio/gr...
The Territories and Women’s Suffrage
• Use a Cornell note to answer some questions about women voting in
territories intro...
Territory and Women’s Suffrage Questions
• Why did the Wyoming Territorial Legislature offer voting rights to
women?
• Wha...
Territory’s Strategies for Suffrage
• Strategies used to get women the right to vote varied from one area
to the next. The...
How Did the Census Impact Territories?
• The first six censuses were similar in content, being authorized by the
federal l...
Access to Voting Successes and Challenges
• Use a Cornell note about voting.
Look for the following:
• Wyoming, first terr...
Disenfranchise: Edmunds-Tucker Act 1887
• Create a Cornell note to record details concerning the Edmunds-
Tucker Act 1887....
Edmunds-Tucker Act 1887 Text
• Review the Edmunds-Tucker Act excerpt for additional points of
concern.
• Volunteers to rea...
Utah Reaction to the Edmunds-Tucker Act
• Put yourself in the place of people in the Utah Territory who can’t
vote after 1...
Other Attempts to Disenfranchise
• Did other territories restrict voting rights? What issues took away voting?
• “Although...
Readers’ Theater - “Great Indignation Meeting,”
January 6, 1870 and January 13, 1870.
• On a blank paper, write the main i...
Thank you & Exit Question
• Thank you to all participants of the Readers’ Theater.
• Thank you to all audience members act...
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Day 4: The Path to Suffrage

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Women's Suffrage in the New Settlements

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Day 4: The Path to Suffrage

  1. 1. The Path to Suffrage Women’s Suffrage in the New Settlements
  2. 2. Starter And Objective • Starter: Describe how organizers of the Seneca Falls Convention could get their message to women living west of the Rocky Mountains. • I Can Statement: I can describe when at least two territories gave women the right to vote and why.
  3. 3. Map Skills Review • What is the most frequently used word on this 1850 U. S. map? • http://sites.rootsweb.com/~mnwabbio/graphics/1850us.jpg (accessed 8-8-2019).
  4. 4. The Territories and Women’s Suffrage • Use a Cornell note to answer some questions about women voting in territories introduced by a small group read/pair/share activity. • Which territories offered voting to women first? • How did the vote for women become law in each territory? • Did women in any territory loose the vote before 1900? • Who were leaders in the territory voting movements?
  5. 5. Territory and Women’s Suffrage Questions • Why did the Wyoming Territorial Legislature offer voting rights to women? • What did those willing to offer women voting rights in the Utah Territory want in return? • Why were Utah government leaders willing to write laws granting women voting rights? • What did Colorado legislators hope to gain by offering women voting rights? • How did the Idaho women’s voting rights act differ from laws created in nearby states?
  6. 6. Territory’s Strategies for Suffrage • Strategies used to get women the right to vote varied from one area to the next. The following strategies were the most popular. • Petition • Letter writing • Magazines including The Woman’s Exponent • Pamphlets • https://ilovehistory.utah.gov/people/images/wells.jpg (8-8-2019) Photo of Emmeline B. Wells, editor.
  7. 7. How Did the Census Impact Territories? • The first six censuses were similar in content, being authorized by the federal law of 1 March 1790 as mandated by the U.S. Constitution counting head of household, numbered how many people lived at the residence. • Congress created with a 60,000 population minimum for statehood. • Census taken before a territory could apply for statehood to verify population. • Congress certain that 60,000 people want statehood, a bill creating the state must be proposed and passed. • https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/overview/1790.html; https://study.com/academy/lesson/statehood-definition-lesson-quiz.html (both accessed 8-8- 2019).
  8. 8. Access to Voting Successes and Challenges • Use a Cornell note about voting. Look for the following: • Wyoming, first territory to offer women’s suffrage, 1869. • Utah, first women to vote in a municipal election after suffrage granted, Feb. 14, 1870. • Which social or ethnic groups were not included in the original suffrage laws passed in Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, and Idaho? • Seraph Young, first woman to vote in Utah, February 14, 1870. Mural in the House of Representative Chamber, State Capitol Building, Salt Lake City, Utah. Photographer: Helen Elaine Jones (6- 12-2019).
  9. 9. Disenfranchise: Edmunds-Tucker Act 1887 • Create a Cornell note to record details concerning the Edmunds- Tucker Act 1887. • Edmunds-Tucker Act adds enforcement details to many parts of the Cullom Bill addressing polygamy in the Utah Territory introduced but not passed in 1867. • Edmunds-Tucker Act important points: “It required plural wives to testify against their husbands, dissolved the Perpetual Emigrating Fund Company (a loan institution that helped members of the church come to Utah from Europe), abolished the Nauvoo Legion militia, and provided a mechanism for acquiring the property of the church.” • Utah History Encyclopedia, “Polygamy,” by Jessie L. Embley, https://www.uen.org/utah_history_encyclopedia/p/POLYGAMY.shtml (accessed 8-6-2019).
  10. 10. Edmunds-Tucker Act 1887 Text • Review the Edmunds-Tucker Act excerpt for additional points of concern. • Volunteers to read aloud specific sections needed. Teacher will read sections 24 & 25. • Look for the following concerns: children of a plural wife legally labeled illegitimate; women can’t vote; Indians not taxed excluded from voting; men can’t hold political office, serve on a jury, or vote unless they take an oath against polygamy, schools now under federal control.
  11. 11. Utah Reaction to the Edmunds-Tucker Act • Put yourself in the place of people in the Utah Territory who can’t vote after 1887. How would you react to changes created by the Edmunds-Tucker Act? • How does the Edmunds-Tucker Act impact voting in the Utah Territory? • Can you find the evidence of voting changes in the excerpt provided?
  12. 12. Other Attempts to Disenfranchise • Did other territories restrict voting rights? What issues took away voting? • “Although forming a sizeable minority, Mormons in Idaho were held in suspicion by others in Idaho. By 1882 notable and powerful Idahoans successfully disenfranchised Mormon voters." • “In 1871, Susan B. Anthony and Abigail Scott Duniway led a crusade through the territories of Washington and Oregon and helped to form the Washington Woman Suffrage Association. Due to the group's constant protesting and pushing, full voting rights were given to women in 1883 by a bill that passed through the Territorial Legislature. But in 1887, the Territorial Supreme Court overturned that law. This happened because women voters were making sales of liquor more difficult with their votes.” • http://www.elmorecountypress.com/Hi-Liting%20Idaho.htm (accessed 7-8-2019) & https://www.sos.wa.gov/elections/timeline/suffrage.htm (accessed 8-7-2019).
  13. 13. Readers’ Theater - “Great Indignation Meeting,” January 6, 1870 and January 13, 1870. • On a blank paper, write the main ideas of the messages presented during the Readers’ Theater. • Students taking the speaking parts should come to the front of the room. The narrator(s) will announce each speaker. • Narrator, Resolutions presenter; Sarah Russell’s minute recording of Sarah Kimball’s speech; speech excerpts by Mrs. Wilmarth East, Eliza R. Snow (3 readers needed), Harriet Cook Young, Mrs. Hannah T. King, and Phoebe Woodruff.
  14. 14. Thank you & Exit Question • Thank you to all participants of the Readers’ Theater. • Thank you to all audience members actively listening. • Exit Question: How much time or money would be needed to get voting rights back after 1887?

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