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The Science of Improvement: How to Systematically Innovate Classroom Practice

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Slides from ETTSummit Boston 2017

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The Science of Improvement: How to Systematically Innovate Classroom Practice

  1. 1. T H E S C I E N C E O F I M P R O V E M E N T : 
 H O W T O S Y S T E M A T I C A L L Y I N N O VA T E C L A S S R O O M P R A C T I C E Photo by Dawid Zawiła on Unsplash http://bit.ly/improvement2017
  2. 2. Q U I C K T H I N K # 1
  3. 3. Q U I C K T H I N K # 1 • What are the most important skills that your students should learn by the end of the school year?

  4. 4. Q U I C K T H I N K # 1 • What are the most important skills that your students should learn by the end of the school year?
 • What are the most important skills that your students should gain over the next FIVE (5) years?

  5. 5. Q U I C K T H I N K # 1 • What are the most important skills that your students should learn by the end of the school year?
 • What are the most important skills that your students should gain over the next FIVE (5) years?
 • What are the most important skills that your students should gain over the next TEN (10) years?
  6. 6. “Can technology accelerate and deepen the quality of learning?” ~ Michael Fullan
  7. 7. Time Rate of Change We are here Eric Teller as cited in Thomas Friedman (2016) Technology Human Adaptability
  8. 8. Time Rate of Change We are here Eric Teller as cited in Thomas Friedman (2016) Learning Faster & Governing Smarter Technology Human Adaptability
  9. 9. “How do we encourage our students to be problem seekers, question askers, and knowledge constructors?”
  10. 10. If Technology is the solution…
  11. 11. What is the problem it’s trying to solve? If Technology is the solution…
  12. 12. Solutionitis
  13. 13. ~ Kurt Lewin “If you want to truly understand something, try to change it.”
  14. 14. C H A L L E N G E : F R A M E T H E P R O B L E M N OT T H E S O L U T I O N
  15. 15. 3 E SS E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N S Photo by Evan Dennis on Unsplash
  16. 16. 3 E SS E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N S • What specifically are we trying to accomplish?
 Photo by Evan Dennis on Unsplash
  17. 17. 3 E SS E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N S • What specifically are we trying to accomplish?
 • What change might we introduce and why?
 Photo by Evan Dennis on Unsplash
  18. 18. 3 E SS E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N S • What specifically are we trying to accomplish?
 • What change might we introduce and why?
 • How will we know that a change is actually an improvement? Photo by Evan Dennis on Unsplash
  19. 19. E S S E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N # 1 W H A T S P E C I F I C A L L Y A R E W E T R Y I N G T O A C C O M P L I S H ? 

  20. 20. P R I N C I P L E # 1 : 
 P R O B L E M - S P E C I F I C A N D U S E R - C E N T E R E D
  21. 21. What does your ____ say?
  22. 22. What does your ____ say? What does your ____ think?
  23. 23. What does your ____ say? What does your ____ do? What does your ____ think?
  24. 24. What does your ____ say? What does your ____ do? What does your ____ think? What does your ____ feel?
  25. 25. P R I N C I P L E # 2 : 
 P L A N F O R V A R I A T I O N I N T H E S Y S T E M
  26. 26. Student
  27. 27. Student Family
  28. 28. Student Family Teachers
  29. 29. Student Family Teachers
  30. 30. Student Peers Family Teachers
  31. 31. Student Peers Family Teachers
  32. 32. Student Peers Family Family Teachers
  33. 33. Student Peers Family Family Teachers
  34. 34. Student Peers Family Family Teachers Colleagues
  35. 35. Student Peers Family Family Teachers Colleagues Administrators -
  36. 36. Student Peers Family Family Teachers Colleagues Administrators -Peers
  37. 37. Student Peers Family Family Teachers Colleagues AdministratorsPeers
  38. 38. Student Peers Family Family Teachers Colleagues AdministratorsPeers
  39. 39. Student Peers Family Family Teachers Colleagues AdministratorsPeers
  40. 40. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2
  41. 41. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 • Think about an “Awesome Adopter” and a “Reluctant Resistor” in your school.
 

  42. 42. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 • Think about an “Awesome Adopter” and a “Reluctant Resistor” in your school.
 
 • Work through the Exercise on the next slide.
 

  43. 43. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 • Think about an “Awesome Adopter” and a “Reluctant Resistor” in your school.
 
 • Work through the Exercise on the next slide.
 
 • What similarities and differences do you notice between the two individuals that you envisioned?

  44. 44. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 - S T E P I N S I D E T H E S Y S T E M Credit: Project Zero
  45. 45. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 - S T E P I N S I D E T H E S Y S T E M Think What do you understand about this person? Credit: Project Zero
  46. 46. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 - S T E P I N S I D E T H E S Y S T E M Think What do you understand about this person? Feel What is this person’s emotional response to the change you may want to make? Credit: Project Zero
  47. 47. Q U I C K T H I N K # 2 - S T E P I N S I D E T H E S Y S T E M Think What do you understand about this person? Feel What is this person’s emotional response to the change you may want to make? Care What are this person’s values, priorities, or motivations about teaching and/or learning? What is important to this person? Credit: Project Zero
  48. 48. E S S E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N # 2 W H A T C H A N G E M I G H T W E I N T R O D U C E A N D W H Y ? 
 Photo by Naletu on Unsplash
  49. 49. P R I N C I P L E # 3 : 
 S E E T H E S Y S T E M T H A T P R O D U C E S T H E O U T C O M E S
  50. 50. M O V I N G F R O M E I T H E R / O R T O B O T H /A N D
  51. 51. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 )
  52. 52. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Greater Purpose
  53. 53. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Greater Purpose Deeper Fear
  54. 54. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Greater Purpose Deeper Fear Left Pole
  55. 55. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Greater Purpose Deeper Fear Left Pole Right Pole
  56. 56. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 )
  57. 57. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments
  58. 58. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms
  59. 59. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice
  60. 60. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice
  61. 61. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice
  62. 62. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice
  63. 63. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge. Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice
  64. 64. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Increase in the education-to-employment gap because students not prepared with new skills • Students not prepared to complete cognitively demanding tasks. • Students frustrated and bored with school because of school-life dichotomy. • Students passive consumers rather than active creators of understanding. • Students lack ways to engage with content and context. • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge. Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice
  65. 65. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Increase in the education-to-employment gap because students not prepared with new skills • Students not prepared to complete cognitively demanding tasks. • Students frustrated and bored with school because of school-life dichotomy. • Students passive consumers rather than active creators of understanding. • Students lack ways to engage with content and context. • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge.
  66. 66. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Increase in the education-to-employment gap because students not prepared with new skills • Students not prepared to complete cognitively demanding tasks. • Students frustrated and bored with school because of school-life dichotomy. • Students passive consumers rather than active creators of understanding. • Students lack ways to engage with content and context. • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge. Warning Signs • Students distracted by technology • Students focus on tools rather than learning • Initial assessment scores drop. • Teachers and students frustrated
  67. 67. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Increase in the education-to-employment gap because students not prepared with new skills • Students not prepared to complete cognitively demanding tasks. • Students frustrated and bored with school because of school-life dichotomy. • Students passive consumers rather than active creators of understanding. • Students lack ways to engage with content and context. • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge. Warning Signs • Students distracted by technology • Students focus on tools rather than learning • Initial assessment scores drop. • Teachers and students frustrated Warning Signs • Students not engaged in class. • Students resist challenges and intellectual risks. • Students do not have the opportunity to be creative or engage in problem solving • Assessment scores drop • Teachers drive learning
  68. 68. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Increase in the education-to-employment gap because students not prepared with new skills • Students not prepared to complete cognitively demanding tasks. • Students frustrated and bored with school because of school-life dichotomy. • Students passive consumers rather than active creators of understanding. • Students lack ways to engage with content and context. • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge. Warning Signs • Students distracted by technology • Students focus on tools rather than learning • Initial assessment scores drop. • Teachers and students frustrated Warning Signs • Students not engaged in class. • Students resist challenges and intellectual risks. • Students do not have the opportunity to be creative or engage in problem solving • Assessment scores drop • Teachers drive learning Action Steps • Improve teacher knowledge and understanding • Provide vision and language to describe innovation • Develop student fluency and literacy with technology • Refocus students onto learning
  69. 69. P O L A R I T Y M A P P I N G ( K I S E , 2 0 1 4 ) Engaging Learning Environments Dysfunctional Classrooms Traditional Classroom Practice Innovative Classroom Practice • Good practice exists without technology. Have to maintain those positives. • Students, teachers, parents, and community understand the norms of existing practices. • Teachers more comfortable teaching in the ways in which they were taught. • Teachers have seen success with existing strategies. • Students focus on content/process vs tools. • Inspire Creativity with new tools • Encourage Problem Solving • Prepare students to work with new technologies • Allow students to learn from multiple experts (not just in the room). • Opportunity to analyze and synthesize information from disparate sources. • Provide multi-modal inputs and outputs • Creates new types of learning experiences • Increase in the education-to-employment gap because students not prepared with new skills • Students not prepared to complete cognitively demanding tasks. • Students frustrated and bored with school because of school-life dichotomy. • Students passive consumers rather than active creators of understanding. • Students lack ways to engage with content and context. • Focus on technology for the sake of technology • Use new tools to perpetuate traditional practices • Use technology for passive consumption rather than active creation • Students perform worse on assessments • Lack of classroom management and control • Inability to focus on learning because of technology • Inefficient workflow and processes because of lack of technology knowledge. Warning Signs • Students distracted by technology • Students focus on tools rather than learning • Initial assessment scores drop. • Teachers and students frustrated Warning Signs • Students not engaged in class. • Students resist challenges and intellectual risks. • Students do not have the opportunity to be creative or engage in problem solving • Assessment scores drop • Teachers drive learning Action Steps • Improve teacher knowledge and understanding • Provide vision and language to describe innovation • Develop student fluency and literacy with technology • Refocus students onto learning Action Steps • Improve teacher knowledge and understanding • Provide vision and language to describe effective practice • Create new types of opportunities for students to engage in more active and authentic learning. • Focus on broader learning objectives
  70. 70. Q U I C K T H I N K # 3 : I D E N T I F Y Y O U R G R E A T E R P U R P O S E A N D D E E P E R F E A R 1 - Greater Purpose 2- Deeper Fear 3 - Left Pole 4 - Right Pole • 5 - Positives • 6 - Positives • 8 - Negatives • 7 - Negatives 9 - Warning Signs10 - Warning Signs 11 - Action Steps12 - Action Steps
  71. 71. E S S E N T I A L Q U E S T I O N # 3 H O W W I L L W E K N O W T H A T A C H A N G E I S A C T U A L L Y A N I M P R O V E M E N T ? 
 Photo by Jonathan Simcoe on Unsplash
  72. 72. P R I N C I P L E # 4 : 
 C A N ’ T I M P R O V E A T S C A L E W H A T C A N ’ T B E M E A S U R E D
  73. 73. 40% Students scored on some assessment 55% Performed at or above a benchmark 70% Percentage of teachers who find these scores useless
  74. 74. 40% Students scored on some assessment 55% Performed at or above a benchmark 70% Percentage of teachers who find these scores useless
  75. 75. 40% Students scored on some assessment 55% Performed at or above a benchmark 70% Percentage of teachers who find these scores useless Pretty Bar Chart 1 10 100
  76. 76. L E V I T O N , L . C . , & L I P S E Y , M . W. ( 2 0 0 7) . A B I G C H A P T E R A B O U T S M A L L T H E O R I E S : T H E O R Y A S M E T H O D : S M A L L T H E O R I E S O F T R E A T M E N T S . N E W D I R E C T I O N S F O R E VA L U A T I O N , 2 0 0 7 ( 1 1 4 ) , 2 7– 6 2 .
  77. 77. L E V I T O N , L . C . , & L I P S E Y , M . W. ( 2 0 0 7) . A B I G C H A P T E R A B O U T S M A L L T H E O R I E S : T H E O R Y A S M E T H O D : S M A L L T H E O R I E S O F T R E A T M E N T S . N E W D I R E C T I O N S F O R E VA L U A T I O N , 2 0 0 7 ( 1 1 4 ) , 2 7– 6 2 . Input
  78. 78. L E V I T O N , L . C . , & L I P S E Y , M . W. ( 2 0 0 7) . A B I G C H A P T E R A B O U T S M A L L T H E O R I E S : T H E O R Y A S M E T H O D : S M A L L T H E O R I E S O F T R E A T M E N T S . N E W D I R E C T I O N S F O R E VA L U A T I O N , 2 0 0 7 ( 1 1 4 ) , 2 7– 6 2 . B L AC K B OXInput
  79. 79. L E V I T O N , L . C . , & L I P S E Y , M . W. ( 2 0 0 7) . A B I G C H A P T E R A B O U T S M A L L T H E O R I E S : T H E O R Y A S M E T H O D : S M A L L T H E O R I E S O F T R E A T M E N T S . N E W D I R E C T I O N S F O R E VA L U A T I O N , 2 0 0 7 ( 1 1 4 ) , 2 7– 6 2 . B L AC K B OXInput Output
  80. 80. P R I N C I P L E # 5 : 
 U S E D I S C I P L I N E D I N Q U I R Y T O D R I V E I M P R O V E M E N T
  81. 81. C Y C L E S O F I N Q U I R Y : P L A N - D O - S T U D Y -A C T
  82. 82. C Y C L E S O F I N Q U I R Y : P L A N - D O - S T U D Y -A C T Plan
  83. 83. C Y C L E S O F I N Q U I R Y : P L A N - D O - S T U D Y -A C T Plan Do
  84. 84. C Y C L E S O F I N Q U I R Y : P L A N - D O - S T U D Y -A C T Plan Do Study
  85. 85. C Y C L E S O F I N Q U I R Y : P L A N - D O - S T U D Y -A C T Plan Do Study Act
  86. 86. B R Y K , A . S . , G O M E Z , L . M . , G R U N O W , A . , & L E M A H I E U , P. G . ( 2 0 1 5 ) . L E A R N I N G T O I M P R O V E : H O W A M E R I C A ' S S C H O O L S C A N G E T B E T T E R A T G E T T I N G B E T T E R . C A M B R I D G E , M A S S A C H U S E T T S : H A R VA R D E D U C A T I O N P R E S S . Initial Hunches
  87. 87. B R Y K , A . S . , G O M E Z , L . M . , G R U N O W , A . , & L E M A H I E U , P. G . ( 2 0 1 5 ) . L E A R N I N G T O I M P R O V E : H O W A M E R I C A ' S S C H O O L S C A N G E T B E T T E R A T G E T T I N G B E T T E R . C A M B R I D G E , M A S S A C H U S E T T S : H A R VA R D E D U C A T I O N P R E S S . Initial Hunches Develop a Change
  88. 88. B R Y K , A . S . , G O M E Z , L . M . , G R U N O W , A . , & L E M A H I E U , P. G . ( 2 0 1 5 ) . L E A R N I N G T O I M P R O V E : H O W A M E R I C A ' S S C H O O L S C A N G E T B E T T E R A T G E T T I N G B E T T E R . C A M B R I D G E , M A S S A C H U S E T T S : H A R VA R D E D U C A T I O N P R E S S . Initial Hunches Develop a Change Test Under Multiple Conditions
  89. 89. B R Y K , A . S . , G O M E Z , L . M . , G R U N O W , A . , & L E M A H I E U , P. G . ( 2 0 1 5 ) . L E A R N I N G T O I M P R O V E : H O W A M E R I C A ' S S C H O O L S C A N G E T B E T T E R A T G E T T I N G B E T T E R . C A M B R I D G E , M A S S A C H U S E T T S : H A R VA R D E D U C A T I O N P R E S S . Initial Hunches Develop a Change Test Under Multiple Conditions Test Under Varied Conditions
  90. 90. B R Y K , A . S . , G O M E Z , L . M . , G R U N O W , A . , & L E M A H I E U , P. G . ( 2 0 1 5 ) . L E A R N I N G T O I M P R O V E : H O W A M E R I C A ' S S C H O O L S C A N G E T B E T T E R A T G E T T I N G B E T T E R . C A M B R I D G E , M A S S A C H U S E T T S : H A R VA R D E D U C A T I O N P R E S S . Initial Hunches Develop a Change Test Under Multiple Conditions Test Under Varied Conditions Make the Changes Permanent
  91. 91. “ S T A R T S M A L L . L E A R N F A S T . ” B R Y K , A . S . , G O M E Z , L . M . , G R U N O W , A . , & L E M A H I E U , P. G . ( 2 0 1 5 ) . L E A R N I N G T O I M P R O V E : H O W A M E R I C A ' S S C H O O L S C A N G E T B E T T E R A T G E T T I N G B E T T E R . C A M B R I D G E , M A S S A C H U S E T T S : H A R VA R D E D U C A T I O N P R E S S .
  92. 92. Q U I C K T H I N K # 4 - P L A N T O S T U D Y T H E N E X T 1 0 0 H O U R S What problem could you solve in the next 100 hours? What change might you introduce and why? Plan How could you know if your change would lead to improvement? How might we define a measure for success? Study
  93. 93. My Solution Worked!
  94. 94. My Solution Worked! We Effected Measurable Change!
  95. 95. P R I N C I P L E # 6 : A C C E L E R A T E L E A R N I N G T H R O U G H C O M M U N I T I E S D E D I C A T E D T O I M P R O V E M E N T
  96. 96. “Communities formed for improvement create a common language for change.” ~ Bryk et al., 2015
  97. 97. H O W M I G H T W E C R E A T E A S Y S T E M O F L E A R N I N G T H A T VA L U E S O U R S T U D E N T S A S P R O B L E M S E E K E R S , Q U E S T I O N A S K E R S , A N D K N O W L E D G E C R E A T O R S ?
  98. 98. BETH R. HOLLAND August 18, 2017 Thank you! beth@edtechteacher.org edtechteacher.org brholland.com http://bit.ly/improvement2017 LinkedIn /brholland Twitter @brholland

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