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Success Habits That Work | Lynnette McKinley

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Success Habits That Work - Lynnette McKinley

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Success Habits That Work | Lynnette McKinley

  1. 1. Lynnette McKinley Managing Partner McKinley Partners LLC Success Habits That Work
  2. 2. Is your success limited by your habits?
  3. 3. All of these questions are designed to identify behaviors or thought- patterns that are often dictated by our HABITS. How did you score?
  4. 4. Work on them for 30 days and retake this test – the goal is to have your answers move to from #1 or #2 to #3 Identify Habits to Change
  5. 5. Are you Willing To Choose the Unknown? The Black Door
  6. 6. Change will take sacrifice, commitment, focus, and faith to develop new habits. It will stretch you, test you, grow you, and mold you into a person of character and purpose. This is not about “trying.” It is either you will or you will not; there is no in-between. Let’s open the black door!
  7. 7. Success Principle #1: Plan your work and work your plan. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS
  8. 8. Study conducted at Harvard Business School 1979 MBA Program “What They Don’t Teach You at Harvard Business School,” by Mark McCormack THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS
  9. 9. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS Students were asked: “Have you set clear, written goals for your future and made plans to accomplish them?”
  10. 10. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS The study showed: • Only 3% of the students had written goals. • 13% had unwritten goals. • 84% had no goals at all.
  11. 11. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS Ten years later, they interviewed the same group of students and discovered the following: • The 13% with goals earned 2X as much as the 84% with no goals. • The 3% with clear, written goals earned 10X as much as the other 97% put together.
  12. 12. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS If written goals are so important, why don’t people set them? Bryan Tracy, in his best-selling book, “Goals!” shares 4 reasons why people don’t set goals.
  13. 13. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS 1. Don’t think goals are important: If your sphere of Influence does not commit to goal setting, then there is a good chance you will not commit to goals either. Philosophy: You become the average of the five people you hang around the most.
  14. 14. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS 2. Don’t know how to set goals: Most goals are so general that they are simply wishes that never get realized. SMART Goals, on the other hand, are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and time bound.
  15. 15. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS 3. Fear of Failure: The majority of people unconsciously sabotage their success by not setting goals in fear they might fail. Yet failure is a part of every success Story. The key is to fall forward!
  16. 16. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS 4. Fear of Rejection: The fear of man paralyzes people into a life of average. They are afraid to set a goal in fear of criticism if they do not accomplish it.
  17. 17. BOOK RECOMMENDATION Deals specifically with: • Fear of Failure • Fear of Rejection • Fear of Punishment • Fear of Shame By Robert McGee
  18. 18. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS • Make a habit of daily goal setting for the rest of your life. • Focus on what you WANT rather than what you don’t want. • Resolve to be an intentional, goal-seeking person determined to move passionately toward the things that you want.
  19. 19. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS
  20. 20. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS FAMILY LIFE PHYSICAL & HEALTH
  21. 21. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS For each area important to YOU: What is your REALITY? (What do you have?) What are your HABITS? (What you must do and/or become.) What is your DREAM? (What do you want?)
  22. 22. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS Creating SMART Goals SPECIFIC – A specific goal is more likely to be accomplished than a general goal. It will target a particular area in your life or business that you want to improve. A specific goal will answer the following:
  23. 23. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS • What do I want to accomplish? • Why do I want to accomplish it? • Who will be part of making this happen? • Where will I accomplish this goal? Example: ”I want to be successful” is too vague. “I want to increase my income” is more specific.
  24. 24. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS MEASURABLE – Measuring your progress will help you focus and keep on track to reach your goal by the target date. Creating a daily habit to reach this goal inspires you to keep moving forward.
  25. 25. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS A measurable goal will answer the following: • How much? • How many? • How will I know when I met my goal? Example: “I want to increase my income by $10,000.”
  26. 26. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS ATTAINABLE – Identify a specific goal that can be measured, then make sure you are willing and able to accomplish it. Think of the possibilities, but be aware of your own personal limitations. If you were not blessed with a singing voice, your goal should not be to score a record deal!
  27. 27. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS Goals that seem impossible, but are achievable, should not stop you. An attainable goal pushes you out of your comfort zone and directs you toward your ultimate potential. An attainable goal will answer the following:
  28. 28. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS • Can I do this? • How can this goal be accomplished? • Have others done it? • Will meeting the goal challenge me without defeating me? Example: I want to increase my income by $10,000 so I will make one extra presentation a day to add $1,000 income per month.”
  29. 29. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS RELEVANT – To be relevant, a goal must be something that matters to you. It must line up with your vision, your principles, and your passions.
  30. 30. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS A relevant goal will answer the following: • Is this goal worthwhile? • Is this the right time for me? • What is the reason, purpose, or benefit of accomplishing the goal? • Am I passionate about accomplishing it?
  31. 31. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS EXAMPLE: “I want to increase my income by $10,000 so I will make one extra presentation a day to add $1,000 income per month to pay for our family vacation.
  32. 32. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS TIME BOUND – A goal needs a finish line, a moment of celebration, a target date of completion. A commitment to this deadline helps you eliminate distractions and focus your efforts on completing the goal in a timely manner.
  33. 33. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS TIME BOUND – Without a time frame, there is no sense of urgency to take action on a consistent basis. Putting a date of completion on a goal motivates the unconscious mind to work out the details and make it happen. A timely goal will answer the following:
  34. 34. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS • When is the established completion date? • Does that time frame create a practical sense of urgency for me to accomplish it successfully? • What do I need to do monthly, weekly, daily, even hourly to accomplish this goal by the target date?
  35. 35. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS Example: “Over the next 10 months, I want to increase my income by $10,000 so I will make one extra presentation a day to add $1,000 income per month to pay for our family vacation.”
  36. 36. THE VALUE OF WRITTEN GOALS Now it’s time to write some SMART Goals!
  37. 37. Success Principle #2: Understand what you control. We control our attitude! Key Principle: There are two kinds of activities: things we feel like doing and things we don’t. Success comes from being tested in the fire, being pushed to your limits, and having your character shaped by challenging circumstances.
  38. 38. Success Principle #2: Understand what you control. Key concepts to keep our attitude in check: • Lead by example. • The chains of worry are heaviest in idle moments. • For things to change, you must change. • For things to get better, you must get better. • Build on a solid foundation, one day at a time, • one brick at a time.
  39. 39. Success Principle #2: Understand what you control. • Key concepts to keep our attitude in check: • Consistency creates momentum, and consistency • maintains momentum. • All distractions are equal. All excuses are equal. • Develop a ”want to” attitude instead of ”have to” attitude. • Be aware of your habits. Are you lying to yourself?
  40. 40. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Success Principle #3 – If you think you can, or think you can’t, you’re right! Proverbs 23:7: “As a man thinks in his heart, so is he..”
  41. 41. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Programming – how we think Some would call this our “philosophies”
  42. 42. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Programming – how we think Beliefs Key: Belief does not require something to be true, it only requires Us to believe that it’s true! Your belief about yourself will turn out To be true – whether it is or not. Your brain will not know the Difference – it’s neutral.
  43. 43. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Programming – how we think Beliefs Attitudes & Feelings
  44. 44. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Programming – how we think Beliefs Attitudes & Feelings Choices & Decisions
  45. 45. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Programming – how we think Beliefs Attitudes & Feelings Choices & Decisions
  46. 46. WHATSOEVER A MAN THINKS, HE IS Programming – how we think Beliefs Attitudes & Feelings Choices & Decisions Behaviors & Actions
  47. 47. To Sum it all up • We talked about habits and we need to evaluate ours to determine what needs to change. • We possibly identified areas of focus with our Success Habits score. • We read about the “The Black Door” and how we shouldn’t be afraid of the unknown. • We talked about goals and how important they are to be written down. • We learned how to craft SMART goals. • We decided to control what we can control – and we can control our attitude. • We learned that our thoughts will drive our direction and that we may need to reprogram the way we think.
  48. 48. To Sum it all up THANK YOU so much for the opportunity to share with you today. I hope you found value in today’s presentation.

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