Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Properties and Evolution of Late-­type stars - Giusi Micela

78 views

Published on

Brave new worlds
May 29-June 03, 2016 – Lake Como School of Advanced Studies

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Properties and Evolution of Late-­type stars - Giusi Micela

  1. 1. Proper&es  and  Evolu&on  of  Late-­‐ type  stars   G.  Micela   Brave  new  worlds   May  29-­‐June  03,  2016  –  Lake  Como  School  of  Advanced  Studies  
  2. 2. Stellar  observa&ons   •  We  are  interested  in  planets:  why  bother   with  the  stars?     – Stars  and  planets  form  and  evolve  together   – Planetary  properHes  are  derived  from  stellar   signals   – Derived  planetary  properHes  are  normalized  to   stellar  properHes   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  3. 3. A  “Stellar  Planetary  System”   We  cannot  study  planets  ignoring  the  host  star     •  Planet  origin  is  strongly  related  to  stellar  origin     •  Planet  and  star  form  from  the  same  material,   and  evolve  together   •  Stellar  radia@on  determines  surface  proper@es   and  evolu@on  of  the  planet.   We  need  to  know  very  well  the  star  to  understand   the  planet   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  4. 4. What  we  know  on  planets  derives   from  stellar  observa&ons   •  Orbital  parameters,  Mpl/M*    <-­‐  from  the  stellar   mo@on  around  the  center  of  mass   •  Rpl/R*    <-­‐  from  stellar  light  curve   •  Exoplanet  atmosphere  <-­‐  subtrac@ng  stellar   spectra  in  and  out  of  transit   More…   Most  of  planetary  proper&es  are  measured  in   units  of  stellar  quan&&es   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  5. 5. We  need  to  es&mate  stellar:   •  Temperature   •  Luminosity   •  Mass   •  Radius   •  Age   •  Metallicity   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  6. 6. We  measure:   •  Magnitude  (B,V,  …J,  K,..)   •  Spectrum     •  Distance   •  Mo@on   From  these  quan@@es  we  want  to  derive  physical   stellar  quan@@es   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  7. 7. Stellar  quan&&es   •  Mass  !  Temperature,  luminosity,  chemical   abundance  –  distance  -­‐  H-­‐R  diagram  –  stellar   models   •  Radius  !  Luminosity  and  temperature,  stellar   models     •  Mo@on  !  Radial  velocity,  proper  mo@on,   distance   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  8. 8. Other  stellar  quan&&es…   •  Agep  =  Agestar   •  Metallicity  of  the  original  nebula  =  Metallicity   of  the  star   •  …   We  need  to  derive  very  accurately  the  stellar   proper@es   Accuracy  on  planetary  proper&es  cannot  be   higher  than  accuracy  on  stellar  proper&es   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  9. 9. STELLAR  TEMPERATURE   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  10. 10. Stellar  temperature   •  Stellar  temperature  is  not  a  well  defined   quan@ty   •  Stars  are  not  solid  bodies:  different  layers  have   different  local  temperatures   •  We  can  define  several  “temperatures”   •  We  have  to  know  which  temperature  we  are   using   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  11. 11. Effec&ve  temperature   Temperature  of  a  blackbody  which  radiates  with  the   same  total  flux  density  as  the  star   Stefan-­‐Boltzmann  law:   Fbol=σTeff 4   fbol  =  Lbol  /(4πr2)=(R2/r2)          Fbol  =  (α/2)2  σTeff 4   α=2R/r    (angular  diameter)  !     very  difficult  to  measure     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       fbol  measured  flux   Fbol  Surface  flux  
  12. 12. Effec&ve  temperature   The  effecHve  temperature  of  the  Sun  is  Teff=5777K   The  true  solar  spectrum  deviates  from  the   corresponding  blackbody   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  13. 13. Brightness  temperature   Temperature  of  a  blackbody  which  radiates  with   the  same  flux  density  at  a  given  λ  as  the  star   Fλ  =  (R2  /  r2)  Fλ  =  (α/2)2    π  Bλ  (Tb)   Dependent  on  angular  diameter  and  on  λ   O]en  used  at  radio  wavelengths     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  14. 14. Brightness  temperature   Brightness  temperature  of  the  Sun,  some  examples:   λ=4500  "  TB  =  6200K   λ=5263  "  TB  =  6470K   λ=6500  "  TB  =  6000K   (Teff  =  5777)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       RADIO    
  15. 15. Color  temperature   Temperature  of  a  blackbody  which  has  the  same   color  index  as  the  star   •  Independent  from  distance   •  Issues  with  absorp@on,  constants,   •  Dependence  on  bands  G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  16. 16. Color  temperature   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Two  very  different  stellar   spectra   SLOAN   Bessell   T(B-­‐V)(Sun)  ~  5900  K  
  17. 17. Color  temperature   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Narrow-­‐band  filters   Intermediate-­‐band  filters  
  18. 18. Kine&c  temperature   Temperature  of  the  Maxwell  law  describing  the   velocity  distribuHon  of  the  atomic  parHcles   •  It  measures  the  average  speed  of  gas   molecules   •  In  thermodynamic  equilibrium  Tkin  is  equal  to   spectroscopic  temperature.     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  19. 19. Spectroscopic  temperature   •  Excita&on  temperature:  the  temperature  that   through  the  Boltzmann  distribu&on  gives  the   observed  popula@on  numbers   •  Ioniza&on  temperature:  the  temperature  that   through  the  Saha  equa&on  gives  the  ra@o   between  atoms  in  different  ioniza@on  stages     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  20. 20. The  role  of  the  physical  condi&ons   How  energy  levels  are  populated?     " Eq.  Boltzmann  from  sta@s@cal  mechanics   gj  staHsHcal  weight  taking  into  account  the   degeneracy  of  the  state   When  T→0,  Nf→0      all  electrons  in  ground  state.   When  T→∞,  Nf  /Ni  =  gf  /gi    all  states  are  equally   likely  to  be  occupied.      (for  Hydrogen  g=2n2  )   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Nf  /  Ni  =  (gf  /  gi  )  "  e  –(Ef  -­‐  Ei)/kT  
  21. 21. The  role  of  the  physical  condi&ons   How  many  ionized  atoms?   -­‐>  Eq.  Saha   where  Pe  is  the  electronic  pressure   χ  is  the  ionizaHon  potenHal   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  22. 22. •  Both  excita@on  and  ioniza@on  occur   simultaneously.       •  For  every  i,  f,  r   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Nf  /  Ni  =  (gf  /  gi  )  "  e  –(Ef-­‐Ei)/kT  
  23. 23. An  example:   At  what  temperature  does  N2=N1  for  hydrogen     •  Boltzmann  eq.   •  Degeneracy  of  levels      g=2n2       BUT  at  this   temperature  most  of     atoms  are  already   ionized!   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Nf  /  Ni  =  (gf  /  gi  )  "  e  –(Ef-­‐Ei)/kT  
  24. 24.            From  Saha  eq.   Number  of  Excited    Hydrogen  Atoms   ConvoluHon  of  Boltzmann    and  Saha  EquaHons   Maximum  occurs  at  9500K    due  to  lack  of  un-­‐ionized     atoms  above  this  temperature   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  25. 25. Ioniza&on  energies   element   Vo(eV)   V1(eV)   V2(eV   H   13.6   -­‐   -­‐   He   24.58   54.4   -­‐   Mg   7.64   15.03   80.12   Na   5.14   47.29   71.65   Ca   6.11   11.87   51.21   Fe   7.87   16.18   30.64   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  26. 26. Ioniza&on  energies   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  27. 27. As  a  results  of  the  considera@ons  above:   Line  Strength  for  each  element  (and  ioniza&on   level)  are  good  indicators  of  the  temperature     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  28. 28. A  method  to  classify  stars   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  29. 29. Summarizing   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  30. 30. Analyzing  spectra     •  Recognizing  the  absorp@on  lines  of  the   spectrum  we  can  have  a  (rough)    es@mate  of   the  temperature   •  But  we  can  do  much  bemer!!   With  high  resoluHon  spectra  we  may  derive   many  more  informaHon   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  31. 31. Spectra  with  different  R     (normalized  to  the  con@nuum)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  32. 32. The  strength  of  a  line  (Weq),  depends   on  a  variety  of  factors:   • the  abundance  of  the  element  producing  the  line,  the   greater  the  abundance  the  stronger  the  line   • the  transi&on  probability  for  the  line,  the  higher  the   probability  the  stronger  the  line   • the  popula&on  of  the  energy  level  origina@ng  the  line,  the   lower  the  popula@on  number  for  the  energy  level  the   weaker  the  line   • the  line  broadening  mechanism,  since  mechanisms  that   produce  strong  line  wings  do  so  at  the  expense  of  absorp@on   in  the  core   • the  rota&on  velocity  of  the  star   • the  electron  density  Ne,  since  it  governs  the  damping   por@on  of  the  line   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  33. 33. Curve  of  Growth   A:  the  number  of  absorbing  atoms  with   electrons  in  the  proper  energy  level.   For  a  given  T,  p   As  more  and  more     atoms  contribute  to     the  observed  spectral   line,  the  normalized     equivalent  width  W/λ   of  the  line  changes  as     the  curve  of  growth.   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  34. 34. The effect of different excitation energies χ for spectral lines from the same element.   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  35. 35. Using  lines  of  the  same  element  and  different   ioniza&on  stage  (i.e.  FeI  &  FeII)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       A  plot  of  the  values  for   different  parameters   can  be  used  to   establish  the  effec&ve   temperature  and   surface  gravity  in   individual  stars.     Excita&on     +     Ioniza&on  
  36. 36. In  Summary   •  Effec@ve  temperature   •  Brightness  temperature   •  Color  temperature   •  Kine@c  temperature   •  Spectroscopic  temperature  –  more  difficult  for   cool  stars   – Excita@on   – Ioniza@on   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  37. 37. STELLAR  METALLICITY   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  38. 38. [Fe/H]   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Iron  abundance  consistent   with  g-­‐T-­‐ξ  solu&on  
  39. 39. Stellar  metallicity   •  Other  element  abundances  from  individual   lines,  assuming  T  –  g  -­‐  ξ  from  spectroscopic   analysis   or   •  Scaling  to  solar  ra@o  (approximate)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  40. 40. Stellar  metallicity  from  photometry   •  Metallic  absorp@on  lines  absorb  a  frac@on  of   the  star's  radiant  energy  and  then  re-­‐emit  it  at   a  lower  frequency  (backwarming  effect)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  41. 41. Stellar  metallicity  from  photometry   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  42. 42. Stellar  metallicity:  Summary   •  From  individual  lines:  the  most  precise  method   ≈  0.1  dex   •  Elements  ≠  Fe  more  uncertain:  less  lines   •  From  photometry:  qualitaHve  measurements,   useful  for  populaHon  studies   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  43. 43. STELLAR  LUMINOSITY   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  44. 44. Stellar  luminosity   •  To  measure  luminosity  we  need  to  measure   distance   L  =  f  #  4  π  d2   •  Parallax     •  Photometric  distance:  from  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  45. 45. Stellar  distance:  Parallax   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  46. 46. Stellar  distance:  Parallax  with   GAIA   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Hipparcos   GAIA   Limi@ng  magnitude   1.,4   20   Nstars   120,000   10  8-­‐9   Astrometric   accuracy   1000μas   7μas  @G<10   12-­‐25μas  @G=15   100-­‐300μas  @G=20   corresponds  to  1–2%    distance  accuracy  at  1kpc  for  G=15   –  100,000  stars  with  distance  accuracy  bemer  than  0.1%   –  11  million  stars                                                                                                                                1%   –  150  million  stars                                                                                                                          10%  
  47. 47. Stellar  luminosity   L  =  f  !  4  π  d2   f  =  de-­‐reddened  incident  bolometric  flux   m  =  -­‐2.5  #  log10  (f)  +  C   mv  –  Mv  =  5  log10  (d)  -­‐  5  +  Av   Mbol  =  Mv  +  BC   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  48. 48. Reddening  Av     Av  =  (3.2  ±  0.2)  #  E(B  –  V)   E(B-­‐V)  =  (B  –  V)  –  (B  –  V)0   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Spty  ≅  Teff   Color-­‐  Temperature  
  49. 49. Color-­‐  temperature  transforma@on   Calibrated  using  synte@c  photometry  from  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Pecaut  &  Mamajek,  2013,  (PK13);  Herczeg  &  Hillebrand,  2014  (HH14)   Kenyon  &  Hartmann,  1995  (KH95);  Luhman  &  al.  2013  (LSM+14)   Cohen  &  Kuhi,  1979  (CK79)  
  50. 50. Bolometric  correc&on   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  51. 51. Stellar  luminosity:  Summary   •  Parallax  from  GAIA  will  reduce  the  distance   error   •  Temperature  error   •  Reddening  &  BC:  s@ll  large  uncertain@es  for   late-­‐type  stars   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  52. 52. STELLAR  MASS   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  53. 53. Stellar  mass  in  binary  systems   The  only  “direct”  way:   gravity  effect   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  54. 54. Stellar  mass  in  binary  systems   Visual  Binaries:   (M1  +  M2)  P2  =  A3    with  A  =  a”/π”   M1  A1  =  M2  A2      with  (A1  +  A2  =  A)   •  This  can  take  decades   •  Need  to  work  out  the  projec@on  on  the  sky   •  A  ≈  d  "    P2  ≈    d3    "  error  in  distance  is  amplified   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  55. 55. Stellar  mass  in  binary  systems   Spectroscopic  Binaries:   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  56. 56. Stellar  mass  in  binary  systems   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Velocity  curve  for  a   spectroscopic  binary  
  57. 57. Stellar  mass  in  binary  systems   Spectroscopic  Binaries:   Velocity  curve    "      Δλ/λe  =  vr  /  c   Circular  orbit  and  edge-­‐on  "  A1  =  V1P/2π  &  A2  =  V2P/2π   M2/M1    =  A1/A2  =  V1/V2   (M2  +  M1  )  =  A3/P2   In  general  m"  sin  (i)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  58. 58. Stellar  mass  in  binary  systems   Eclipsing  Binaries:   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       known  orienta@on  
  59. 59. Stellar  mass  in  eclipsing  binary  systems   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       2rs  =  v  (tf  –  te)  =  v(th  –  tg)       2(rs  +  rl)  =    v(  th  –  te)     A  =  v  P/2π   (rs/a)  =  π  (tf  –  te)/P   (rl/a)  =  π  (th  –  tf)/P  
  60. 60. Stellar  mass  in  eclipsing  binary  systems   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       2rs  =  v  (tf  –  te)  =  v(th  –  tg)       2(rs  +  rl)  =    v(  th  –  te)     A  =  v  P/2π   (rs/a)  =  π  (tf  –  te)/P   (rl/a)  =  π  (th  –  tf)/P   If  v  known  from  spectra  "  rs  &  rl   Inclina@on  known  "  true  mass                                                                                and  radius   Distance  is  not  necessary    
  61. 61. Stellar  mass  from  models   •  Several  models:  each  op@mized  for  different   stars/condi@ons   •  Different  way  to  consider  opacity,   overshoo@ng,  dust  in  the  atmospheres,…   •  No  complete  physics  (i.e.  no  internal  rota@on   or  magne@c  fields)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  62. 62. Comparison  of  Evolu@onary  Tracks   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Mathieu  et  al.  (2007)  
  63. 63. Stellar  mass  from  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  64. 64. Stellar  mass  from  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  65. 65. Stellar  mass  from  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  66. 66. Stellar  mass:  Summary   •  Mass  from  binary  systems  from  Kepler  law,   dependent  on  inclina@on  except  than  for   eclipsing  binaries   •  In  most  case  masses  from  stellar  models:  very   uncertain  in  par@cular  for  cool  stars.   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  67. 67. STELLAR  RADIUS   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  68. 68. Stellar  radius  measurements   Very  difficult  problem:     the  radius  of  the  Sun@10  pc  is  0”.001   •  Eclipsing  binaries–  see  above   •  Lunar  occulta&on   •  Interferometry   •  Comparison  with  model  predic&ons   •  Photometric  radius   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  69. 69. Radius  from  lunar  occulta&on   direct  measure   rs”  =  vmoon#tcr   •  Moon  does  not  cover  all  the  stars  in  the  sky.   •  Moon’s  angular  speed  is  quite  large  (0.52  arcsec/sec   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  70. 70. Radius  from  lunar  occulta&on   rs”  =  vmoon#tcr   •  Sun  @10  pc  "  tcr  =  0.00038sec  !!     $   very  fast  camera   $   very  bright  stars   ≤  150  STARS  WITH  LUNAR  OCCULTATION   "  Limited  applica&on   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  71. 71. Radius  from  interferometry   R”  =  2.95  10-­‐3  λ/D   R”=  Diameter   D  =  SeparaHon  between  the  mirrors  (cm)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       ΔR/R  ≤  5%  
  72. 72. Stellar  radius  from  models   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  73. 73. Photometric  radius   From  Fbol=σTeff 4   Lbol=4πrs 2σTeff 4   …but…   BC,  distance,  Temperature…   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  74. 74. Stellar  radius:  Summary   •  Eclipsing  binaries   •  Direct  measures  "  ~few  100  stars   •  Comparison  with  models:  very  uncertain  for   cool  stars   •  Photometric  measurement:  errors  from  Teff,   BC,  distance,  etc   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  75. 75. STELLAR  AGE   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  76. 76. Stellar  age   •  Ages of stellar populations –  isochronal ages –  main-sequence turn-off •  Ages of individual stars –  isochronal ages –  Li depletion –  rotation-activity relation –  surface gravity as a proxy for age –  kinematic ages: young stellar moving groups   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  77. 77. Isochronal  Ages  of  Stellar  Popula&ons   •  isochrones: 1,3, 10, 30 Myr •  evolutionary tracks: 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5,2.0, 2.5, 3.0,  3.5  Msun   Palla  &  Stahler  (2000)     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  78. 78. Isochronal  Ages  of  Stellar  Popula&ons   •  isochrones: 1,3, 10, 30 Myr •  evolutionary tracks: 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0, 1.2, 1.5,2.0, 2.5, 3.0,  3.5  Msun   Palla  &  Stahler  (2000)   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  79. 79. Comparison  of  Evolu&onary  Tracks   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       G2  star   K6  star   Mathieu  et  al.  (2007)  
  80. 80. Main  Sequence  Turn-­‐Off  Ages   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       4  Gyr   6  Gyr  
  81. 81. @old  ages   The  old  open  cluster  M67   Isochrones  at   3,  4,  5,  6  Gyr   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  82. 82. @very  old  ages   The  globular  cluster  M92   Isochrones  at   12,  15,  18,  21   Gyr   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  83. 83. The  age  of  disk  (popula&on  I)  stars   8,  11,  13,  15  Gyr,  [Fe/H]  =  -­‐0.5,  0.0,  +0.3   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  84. 84. Kinema&c  Ages:   Young  Moving  Groups   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Lopez  SanHago  et  al.  (2006)  
  85. 85. Age  from  Lithium  deple&on   EW(Li)  dependent  on:   –  temperature   –  pressure   •  Li  decreases  with  age   •  Large  scamer   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  86. 86. Rota&on-­‐Ac&vity  Rela&on   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Mamajek    &  Hillenbrand  2008  
  87. 87. Surface  Gravity  as  a  Proxy  of  Age   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      Slesnick  et  al  (2006)  
  88. 88. Planet  parameters  !    stellar  parameters  (asteroseismology)   Power  spectrum  of  light  curves  gives  frequencies     •  Large  separa@ons    ∝  √M/R3  %  mean  density   •  Small  separa@ons  probe    the  core  %  age   •  Inversions  +  model  fi‚ng  %  consistent  ρ,  M,  age   Space  observa@ons  provide:   Uncertainty  in  Mass  ~  2%          Uncertainty  in  Age  ~  10%   G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds       Asteroseismology  
  89. 89. Asteroseismology     Solar power spectrum (SOHO/VIRGO) HD 52265 (CoRoT) (Gizon  et  al.  2013)     Example: HD52265 is a G0V type, planet hosting star •  Seismic parameters: Radius: 1.34 ± 0.02 Rsun, Mass: 1.27 ± 0.03 Msun, Age: 2.37 ± 0.29 Gyr CoRoT and Kepler have demonstrated that the required accuracies can be met. " PLATOG.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      
  90. 90. Stellar  age:  Summary   •  Possibility  to  dis@nguish  young  &  old  stars   •  Age  determina@on  @young  age  (1Gyr)   •  Very  uncertain  age  @  old  stars   •  Asteroseismology  is  very  promising,  s@ll   limited  to  a  small  sample  "  PLATO     G.  Micela    -­‐    Brave  New  Worlds      

×