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OD FROM BOTTOM UP
AGILE PRACTICES IN
THE SOFTWARE
INDUSTRY
About the Speakers
Vijaya Devi
OD Consultant and IT project
management expert
vijaya@dreampipe.in
Suresh Konduru
Global Ag...
AGI
LE
SOFTWARE
DEVELOPMENT
METHODOLOGY
2001 onwards
• What and Why of Agile
• SCRUM : an Agile Method in Practice
• Success Stories, Limitations and
Challenges
Contents
80s & 90s
:
PROJECT
SUCCES
S
RATE
Loss of business credibility, loss of customer, financial losses,
burnout and stress
An ...
“For a new software system, the requirements will
not be completely known until after the users have
used it”
Humphrey’s U...
Complexity Conformity
Invisibility Changeability
• Waterfall - a rational
engineering based approach
• Assumes processes are
predictable, well-defined and
repeatable
• Ass...
Traditional software development life
cycle is highly process-centric and
rationalized
Traditional Systems Development Mod...
Organization Design and Management Style
• Predominantly mechanistic organizations
geared for high-performance in a stable...
Stability is the
norm
Minimize Change
world is linear and
predictable
Deliver on the
planned
resultsIncrease the feeling
o...
The Story of Agilists in
Utah, 2001
Agile Methodologies
aka
Lightweight Methodologies
Leaning
Towards
Agile
51%
Pure Agile
16%
Pure
Waterfall
2%
Waterfall
7%
Hybrid
24%
Agile is the New Normal : HP Survey 201...
State of Agile Survey: Version One
5%
1%
33%
44%
17%
Organizations – Level of Agile adoption
Not practicing
Agile
Unsucces...
Agile Methodologies
• Empirical process control
• Frequent inspection and
adaptation
• Short iterative cycles, with
period...
• Organic management system
• Provides for the inherent instability in the systems
development projects
• Less formalizati...
Chaos is
the norm
Use results
to drive
planning
Murphy's
law rules
Correct to
what's
possibleIncrease feeling
of security ...
General Systems Theory
Controller
System
Software
Development
System
Customer
System
Requirements
Resources
Software
Other...
Internal
Controller System
Core
Development
System
Internal
Customer
System
External Controller System
External Customer S...
Socio Technical Systems
WORKSTURCTURE
TECHNOLOGY PEOPLE
Task Requirements, ‘technically
required cooperation’
Social and
p...
Socio Technical Systems
• Semi-autonomous agents and self-organisation
– reflect the view of organizations as bottom-up an...
Agile Manifesto
We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it
and helping others do it.
Through this wo...
The 12 Principles
1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the
customer through early and continuous
delivery of valuable sof...
10th Annual State of Agile Survey, VersionOne, March 2016
1 1 <1 1 1 3 2 2 3 5 7 8 10
58
83%
Different Agile Methods
Essence of Scrum
Scrum should not be viewed just as a collection of
practices, rather as a culture or a set of values
- Ke...
Scrum-Big Picture
3 Roles 5 Events 3 Artifacts
Limitations of Agile
• Limitations of Agile
– Co-location of teams
– Scaling to large teams
– Fixed Price projects
Critici...
How to measure success?
• Business Metrics:
– RoI (Money Spent Vs Business Value)
– NPS
– Lead Time for market release of ...
HR’s Role in Agile Adoption
Success stories
Agile journey since 2010
Waterfall: 8 defects per release, 60% on time
delivery
Agile: 1 defect per releas...
Challenges
• Agile Mindset - ‘Doing Agile vs Being Agile’
– focus is more on process rather than people
– product teams ar...
Agile Practices in Software - OD from Bottom Up
Agile Practices in Software - OD from Bottom Up
Agile Practices in Software - OD from Bottom Up
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Agile Practices in Software - OD from Bottom Up

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Presented at the IODA Annual Global Gathering 2016, at Mysuru by S.Vijaya Devi and Suresh Konduru. Talks about how Agile practices in the software industry, such as SCRUM, why Agile happened in the first place, its theoretical basis and the accompanying management practices and how Agile is a bottom-up approach for OD

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Agile Practices in Software - OD from Bottom Up

  1. 1. OD FROM BOTTOM UP AGILE PRACTICES IN THE SOFTWARE INDUSTRY
  2. 2. About the Speakers Vijaya Devi OD Consultant and IT project management expert vijaya@dreampipe.in Suresh Konduru Global Agile Practice Head, Capgemini. Hyderabad SureshKumarKonduru@gmail.com
  3. 3. AGI LE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT METHODOLOGY 2001 onwards
  4. 4. • What and Why of Agile • SCRUM : an Agile Method in Practice • Success Stories, Limitations and Challenges Contents
  5. 5. 80s & 90s : PROJECT SUCCES S RATE Loss of business credibility, loss of customer, financial losses, burnout and stress An urgent need to change the way software was being delivered And improve the quality of life of people who were working with complexity and uncertainty on a daily basis
  6. 6. “For a new software system, the requirements will not be completely known until after the users have used it” Humphrey’s Uncertainty Principle
  7. 7. Complexity Conformity Invisibility Changeability
  8. 8. • Waterfall - a rational engineering based approach • Assumes processes are predictable, well-defined and repeatable • Assumes processes can be adequately measured, sources of variations identified and controlled during the development life cycle • Emphasis on solid design and thorough planning to develop a flawless software that satisfies user needs Traditional Systems Development Model
  9. 9. Traditional software development life cycle is highly process-centric and rationalized Traditional Systems Development Model
  10. 10. Organization Design and Management Style • Predominantly mechanistic organizations geared for high-performance in a stable environment • Command-and-control, with a set hierarchy • High formalization, standardization and specialization • Customer’s role maximum only during the specification and the implementation stages
  11. 11. Stability is the norm Minimize Change world is linear and predictable Deliver on the planned resultsIncrease the feeling of security by adding rigor to the process Use the plan to drive results It’s controllable Establish stronger procedures and policies Traditional Mindset
  12. 12. The Story of Agilists in Utah, 2001 Agile Methodologies aka Lightweight Methodologies
  13. 13. Leaning Towards Agile 51% Pure Agile 16% Pure Waterfall 2% Waterfall 7% Hybrid 24% Agile is the New Normal : HP Survey 2015 Agile Adoption Survey - HP
  14. 14. State of Agile Survey: Version One 5% 1% 33% 44% 17% Organizations – Level of Agile adoption Not practicing Agile Unsuccessful adoptions Early adoption Very early to mature adoption Mature adoption
  15. 15. Agile Methodologies • Empirical process control • Frequent inspection and adaptation • Short iterative cycles, with periodic reflections and adaptations and continuous integration • From linear life cycle model to an evolutionary-delivery model • Flexibility and speed to adapt to changes
  16. 16. • Organic management system • Provides for the inherent instability in the systems development projects • Less formalization, decentralization and less supervision - team produces only the most necessary documentation Organization Design and Management Style • Self-organized teams, with a facilitative leader • Teams constituted with diverse skilled people, with inter changing roles • Direct interactions with the customer
  17. 17. Chaos is the norm Use results to drive planning Murphy's law rules Correct to what's possibleIncrease feeling of security by relaxing controls Welcome Change Discover the desired result Unstability reigns Agile Mindset
  18. 18. General Systems Theory Controller System Software Development System Customer System Requirements Resources Software Other Outputs Traditional Systems A Systems Perspective on Agile Software Development Methods : Peter Wendorff, Abdul Rashid Subhani
  19. 19. Internal Controller System Core Development System Internal Customer System External Controller System External Customer System Requirements Resources Software Other Outputs General Systems Theory Agile Systems
  20. 20. Socio Technical Systems WORKSTURCTURE TECHNOLOGY PEOPLE Task Requirements, ‘technically required cooperation’ Social and psychological needs ENVIRONMENT
  21. 21. Socio Technical Systems • Semi-autonomous agents and self-organisation – reflect the view of organizations as bottom-up and emergent rather than top-down and planned • Internal regulation • redundancy of function • task variety • work group as the unit of design • task control • feedback
  22. 22. Agile Manifesto We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value: That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more. (www.agilemanifesto.org) Individuals and Interactions Processes and ToolsOVER Working Software Comprehensive DocumentationOVER Customer Collaboration Contract NegotiationOVER Responding to Change Following a PlanOVER
  23. 23. The 12 Principles 1. Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software. 2. Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage. 3. Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale. 4. Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project. 5. Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done. 6. The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation. 7. Working software is the primary measure of progress. 8. Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely. 9. Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility. 10. Simplicity--the art of maximizing the amount of work not done--is essential. 11. The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organizing teams. 12. At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts its behavior accordingly.
  24. 24. 10th Annual State of Agile Survey, VersionOne, March 2016 1 1 <1 1 1 3 2 2 3 5 7 8 10 58 83% Different Agile Methods
  25. 25. Essence of Scrum Scrum should not be viewed just as a collection of practices, rather as a culture or a set of values - Ken Schwaber Values Transparency Inspection Adaptation Sprint Time-boxing Self-Organized Velocity Lightweight Complex problems Easy to Understand Difficult to Master
  26. 26. Scrum-Big Picture 3 Roles 5 Events 3 Artifacts
  27. 27. Limitations of Agile • Limitations of Agile – Co-location of teams – Scaling to large teams – Fixed Price projects Criticisms on Agile – No grounding in theory
  28. 28. How to measure success? • Business Metrics: – RoI (Money Spent Vs Business Value) – NPS – Lead Time for market release of software • Team Metrics: – PO: Business Value per Feature, Feature Usage Index. – Team: Happiness Index, Quality & Productivity metrics, Burn-down and Burn-up charts. – SM: Impediment Removal Index.
  29. 29. HR’s Role in Agile Adoption
  30. 30. Success stories Agile journey since 2010 Waterfall: 8 defects per release, 60% on time delivery Agile: 1 defect per release, 90% on time delivery Courtesy: www.slideshare.net Implemented Scrum, XP and Lean principles Value stream mapping, Self-organized teams Innovation, Management support Employees who said they are having good time or best time moved from 40% to 86% Courtesy: www.salesforce.com
  31. 31. Challenges • Agile Mindset - ‘Doing Agile vs Being Agile’ – focus is more on process rather than people – product teams are central and rest of the Organizations exist to support them

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