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Design Assistance: Implementation Success Models

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Implementation

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Lessons Learned: Common Challenges
• Communities with trust issues require more
intensive engagement, higher levels of
inv...

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Myth: People are Apathetic
Truth: People are hungry for
meaningful involvement

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Design Assistance: Implementation Success Models

  1. 1. Implementation
  2. 2. Lessons Learned: Common Challenges • Communities with trust issues require more intensive engagement, higher levels of involvement
  3. 3. Myth: People are Apathetic Truth: People are hungry for meaningful involvement
  4. 4. Indianapolis
  5. 5. Case Study – Birmingham, AL
  6. 6. Impact
  7. 7. Frustration • "I think everyone in the neighborhood is tired," said Patricia Montgomery. Montgomery and others are tired of seeing their neighborhood look the way it does. Trees are still down, homes have been abandoned. While many are rebuilding, others are not and Montgomery says lately it doesn't seem like a whole lot of work is being done. "I understand it's going to take a while to get stuff done but when you look out your house everyday and you see trees just laying, dead trees just laying there it makes you like, I'm so sick of this," said Montgomery. "I'm willing to get out there and help. My neighbors, I'm sure there are willing to get out there and help but we don't know where to start."
  8. 8. Immediate Outcomes • “it is a plan than we can use as a guide as we go back to restoring our community to not just the way it was, but better than it was before.”- Mayor William Bell • ‘Greater Pratt Partnership’
  9. 9. Birmingham R/UDAT Outcomes • $8 million in federal funds within 2 months • June 2012 – TIGER Grant of $10 million • “The coalition of communities and organizations that have come together behind this grant is incredibly impressive. I think we all know we are working in an environment of finite resources, so from a federal standpoint it is always extraordinarily helpful to see a large commitment from the local community, the private and public sector and the region as a whole behind one project.” – Federal official • 2013: another $17 million in federal community block grants
  10. 10. Two Year Anniversary - 2013
  11. 11. Community Engagement – Boerne, TX • Survey • Website • Multi-media films • Flyers • Banners • Student Book • Press • Utility Mailers • Door Contest • Event kick-off
  12. 12. Boerne Process
  13. 13. Studio
  14. 14. Outcomes
  15. 15. Implementation: The Design Assistance Model
  16. 16. Most Communities Today “If we can just get that one, big, transformational investment done, it will change everything for us.” [years of effort…no visual progress during this time…loss of excitement…bottom falls out.]
  17. 17. The Snowball Effect “a figurative term for a process that starts from an initial state of small significance and builds upon itself, becoming larger and faster at every stage” Applied to a community, this is a transformational principle…
  18. 18. MOMENTUM! MOMENTUM MOMENTUM MOMENTUM
  19. 19. CASE STUDY: Port Angeles, Washington (Population: 17,000) 2009 Project
  20. 20. Prioritization • Staff picked through and identified implementation items • Survey at Public Meeting • Committee Review and Prioritization
  21. 21. 1. Parking study in the downtown area. 2. Increase housing opportunity and multi‐use buildings in downtown. 3. Institute the use of form based codes rather than conventional zoning. 4. Remove the parking regulations in downtown and let the market drive parking. 5. Return the Farmer's Market to the downtown area. 6. Signage and wayfinding system for pedestrian and vehicles. 7. Improve existing buildings (appearance, facades, etc. in downtown and elsewhere). 8. Provide visitor information kiosks. 9. Create an entryway monument. 10. Create nodes / centers of key intersections. Immediate Implementation
  22. 22. What success looks like in Port Angeles, Washington
  23. 23. Port Angeles, WA 2009 Project: 2 months later, 43 buildings repainted with volunteers and donated paint, (at least 3,500 volunteer hours, or roughly $66,500 worth of donated labor) led to a façade improvement program, then private $
  24. 24. Bike Facilities
  25. 25. Wayfinding & Signage
  26. 26. Implementation Today, major investments all over town Some Examples: Waterfront Redevelopment $17 million Marine Campus Facility $12 million
  27. 27. Waterfront: from Team Process to Masterplan to groundbreaking , to…
  28. 28. Realizing Their Aspirations, in 5 years
  29. 29. Bringing People Back to the Waterfront
  30. 30. Creating an Attractive Sense of Place
  31. 31. Transforming Downtown: Before
  32. 32. Transforming Downtown: After
  33. 33. Snowball Effect: $100 Million+ Leveraging Investment for Placemaking
  34. 34. They are already in construction for phase 2
  35. 35. MOMENTUM! MOMENTUM MOMENTUM MOMENTUM
  36. 36. Newport, VT R/UDAT (2009)
  37. 37. Context • “Northeast Kingdom” • Rural, Extremely Isolated • Canadian Border • Last town in state to receive downtown designation • double-digit unemployment
  38. 38. 2009 - Civic Pride Paradox “I’ve seen Newport come, and I’ve seen it go.” - Lifelong Newport resident
  39. 39. ‘Sugar on Snow’ Event Kickoff – Newport, VT
  40. 40. R/UDAT Formats
  41. 41. Contests/Competitions – Newport, VT
  42. 42. Catalyst for Action • “I don’t think this is one of those things that will sit on a shelf…this is about stimulating thought about what could happen. Above all, you have to be patient. When you see the right things coming together – and you see that in Newport – it’s cause for hope.” –Kevin Dorn, Secretary of Commerce & Community Development, State of Vermont
  43. 43. Newport – Two Years Later • Civic “Attitude Adjustment” – “When you have people working together, things can happen and do happen. That’s the most important change that has occurred – a change in attitude. All of a sudden, nothing is impossible.” – Newport Citizen
  44. 44. Wayfinding & Signage
  45. 45. Form Based Code
  46. 46. • 2011 – Newport receives Foreign Trade Zone status • 2011 – Canadian manufacturing firm co-locates here • 2011 – 2012 – Vermont biotech firm re-locates here • 2012 – 2013 – South Korean biotech firm co-locates here • 2013 – Senior residential resort is built • 2014 – Waterfront resort conference center opens • 2014 – Re-development of blighted block on Newport’s Main St. Newport 2.0: $250 Million in New Investments
  47. 47. a six-story commercial and residential block -$70 million
  48. 48. Momentum!
  49. 49. Case Study - East Nashville, TN • Tornado, 1998. One year later: “today many in East Nashville feel that the tornado recovery is stalled. ”The long term recovery hasn’t been as fast or as much as we’d hoped,“ says Lindsay Fairbanks, an East Nashville resident and real estate agent. “Blue tarps still flap in the wind. Recalcitrant insurance companies and inadequate insurance coverage frustrate the efforts of many to rebuild. East Nashville legend has it that some absentee landlords pocketed their payoffs and left for Europe, or at least to Destin. As a result, their damaged buildings were left behind to molder in the rain. And those with the funds and the will to build new structures on the vacant lots find themselves faced with a suburban-style zoning code more at home in Bellevue.” • R/UDAT – 800 participants, transformative community event that organized the neighborhood and aligned resources
  50. 50. R/UDAT Outcomes • Rediscover East! Formed • CDBG and HUD funds • Kroger re-opened grocery stores • Town Square urban design • “The R/UDAT empowered the whole community to identify a common direction and form the partnerships – and pools of capital – to make it a reality. The most significant outcome was the private investment that came after the R/UDAT. Investors and developers realized East Nashville’s significant potential.”-Architect magazine, 2011
  51. 51. R/UDAT Impacts in large cities over the years… • San Francisco (Embarcadero) • Portland (Pearl District) • Seattle (Downtown housing) • Denver (LoDo/16th Street mall) • Austin (Downtown Revitalization) • Santa Fe (Railyard Redevelopment/Park) • Process adaptation in US, UK and across Europe
  52. 52. Portland, OR - 1983
  53. 53. Portland Impact
  54. 54. Today: The Pearl District
  55. 55. San Francisco - 1984
  56. 56. Today: Iconic Place
  57. 57. “You gave us hope. Back in 1992, your ideas seemed like dreams. Now we are living those dreams.” – Rick Smith, San Angelo Times-Standard, 2012
  58. 58. The ‘Snowball Effect’ of DATs
  59. 59. Civic Transformation=$$$ • Crowdfunded first project – Celebration Bridge • total amount of public and private dollars that have been invested in the downtown has reportedly grown from less than $1 million to more than $55 million/yr. • In 2002, the San Angelo Area Foundation was created. In the past decade, it has received more than $92 million in donations from more than 3,500 different donors, and has distributed over $38 million in grants. One of its recent grants, to the Performing Arts Coalition, is part of a larger effort to raise $13.5 million to convert an old Coca-Cola warehouse into the San Angelo Performing Arts Center.
  60. 60. 20 years later… • “When I tell my younger friends about the part you played in revitalizing our city, they think it's an urban fairy tale: "Once upon a time, a group of architects, planners and urban design experts from around the nation volunteered to travel to San Angelo and work day and night to find ways to change the future of the city." – Rick Smith, San Angelo Times-Standard • “You didn't reshape downtown by yourself, of course. Many San Angeloans worked many years to transform the Historic City Center. But you affirmed our ideas, planted seeds and sketched a possible map for our future. And you gave us hope. Back in 1992, your ideas seemed like dreams. Now we are living those dreams.”
  61. 61. Every community has the potential to develop the civic capacity for success
  62. 62. A Dublin Design Action Team Model
  63. 63. Key Questions • Who do we need to have involved from the beginning to ensure full-scale implementation? • How can we ensure media saturation and buzz for the event? • How can we position civic organizations and citizens for collective action immediately following the event?

Editor's Notes

  • The planning department distilled the SDAT report into a checklist of implementation items. These lists were distributed at public meetings, which allowed the community members to indicate their own priorities. The PA Forward committee then took the community’s preferences and created a scheme for prioritization and implementation.
  • Just two weeks after the SDAT presented more than 30 recommendations, the Port Angeles Forward committee unanimously agreed to recommend 10 of those items for immediate action.
  • less than a month after the conclusion of the SDAT, the community joined together in an effort to revamp the entire downtown, starting with a physical face-lift. Community members donated paint and equipment, and residents picked up their paintbrushes to start the transformation.” During the first summer of implementation, over 43 buildings in the downtown received substantial upgrades, including new paint and other improvements. This effort led to a formal façade improvement program that extended the initiative exponentially. The city dedicated $118,000 in community development block grants for the effort, which catalyzed over $265,000 in private investment.
  • Port Angeles also implemented a signage and wayfinding program, which at last allowed them to capture some of those visitors who came to Port Angeles merely for its proximity to Victoria.
  • Newport was the last city in Vermont to achieve downtown designation from the state. It had some of the highest unemployment (double digits) in VT. They submitted an application to the RUDAT program because they decided that they were done being last, and were instead ready to be first. Newport hosted the first R/UDAT in state history. Hundreds of residents and stakeholders participated in the process.
  • Much like Port Angeles, Newport moved forward into implementation within days of the conclusion of the R/UDAT project. They held public meetings in which community members literally designed, crafted, and installed a new wayfinding and signage program.
  • Newport also took advantage of widespread community participation in the R/UDAT to engage citizens in code changes, designing a participatory process to create the first form-based code in the state. Again, the community members literally wrote the new code.
  • New investments include boutique hotels, a tasting center featuring regional agriculture, and a waterfront resort. The city also created the state’s first foreign trade zone, attracting a Korean biotechnology firm and other businesses.

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