Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Art of Collaboration (by June Gruber)

482 views

Published on

Professor June Gruber describes the benefits of collaboration and how to navigate the challenges of working with collaborators.

Published in: Science
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Art of Collaboration (by June Gruber)

  1. 1. Collaboration A D V A N C E D T R A I N I N G F O R C A R E E R S I N P S Y C H O L O G I C A L S C I E N C E P S Y C H - G A . 3 4 0 4 . 0 0 5 - N Y U ( W E S T & V A N B A V E L ) SEPTEMBER 27, 2017 JUNE GRUBER, PH.D. POSITIVE EMOTION AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY LABORATORY UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO BOULDER
  2. 2. Who to do it with? Why do it? How to do it? Roadmap Dark side? What is it?
  3. 3. Who to do it with? Why do it? How to do it? Roadmap Dark side? What is it?
  4. 4. verb  col·lab·o·rate   kə-ˈla-bə-ˌrāt  First Known Use: 1871 1. To work jointly with others or together especially in an intellectual endeavor. 2. To cooperate with or willingly assist an enemy of one's country and especially an occupying force suspected of collaborating with the enemy. Collaboration Defined Source: Merriam Webster
  5. 5. Rise in Collaborative Psychological Science “Scientific knowledge has traditionally been advanced by individuals, and the reward structure in science reflects this tradition. Graduate students and junior faculty are admonished to establish their independence to show their genius, while avoiding any attributional ambiguity by collaborating with others. When a candidate for tenure fails to heed this advice and publishes instead as a member of a scientific team, faculty review committees and university administrators are inclined to raise questions about the candidate’s contributions and scientific merit…The landscape of science has changed, however.” (Cacippo, 2007)
  6. 6. 0 15 30 45 60 1955 2000 17.5% 1955 51.5% 2000 Changes over time in % of papers written in tams (a-d) and in mean team size (e-h) Rise in Collaborative Psychological Science % papers published by multiple authors % and mean size of teams
  7. 7. Rise in Collaborative Psychological Science % solo author % 2-3 authors % 4+ authors 8% 37% 55% 1% 43% 56% 2% 25% 73% Probably inaccurate estimates from Google Scholar using tally marks on a paper bag at coffee shop
  8. 8. Who to do it with? How to do it? Roadmap Dark side? What is it? Why do it?
  9. 9. 0 15 30 45 60 1955 2000 17.5% 1955 51.5% 2000 Changes over time in % of papers written in tams (a-d) and in mean team size (e-h) Rise in Collaborative Psychological Science % papers published by multiple authors % and mean size of teams
  10. 10. % papers published by multiple authors Wuchty, S., Jones, B.F., & Uzzi, B. (2007b). The increasing dominance of teams in knowledge. Science, 316, 1036-1039. Increased # Citations: citation advantage increases as mean # authors increases (holds when controlling for self-citations). Greater Research Impact: papers with 4+authors receive 2.99x more citations, papers with 6+ authors receive 4.88x citations 0 15 30 45 60 1955 2000 17.5% 1955 51.5% 2000 Changes over time in % of papers written in tams (a-d) and in mean team size (e-h) Rise in Collaborative Psychological Science % and mean size of teams advantages of multi-authored papers
  11. 11. I. Ask complex questions To address more complex psychological questions, it exceeds expertise of any individual investigator requiring multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary teams. Individual expertise insufficient. II. Enhances productivity Working in teams helps get things done (e.g., accountability, division of labor). III. Opportunity to learn Learn from colleagues with distinct expertise on study design, writing style, and professional development issues that inevitably arise along the way. IV. Collaborating is fun Build personal relationships, enjoy the human beings behind the science Reasons to Collaborate
  12. 12. Collaborating is Fun
  13. 13. - A R I S T O T L E , Politics, 11.9, 1109a27 “Man is by nature a social animal; an individual who is unsocial naturally and not accidentally is either beneath notice or more than human. Society is something that precedes the individual.”
  14. 14. How to do it? Roadmap Dark side? What is it? Why do it? Who to do it with?
  15. 15. Many Faces of Collaboration
  16. 16. Many Faces of Collaboration
  17. 17. Who to Collaborate With 3 . N O N - I D E N T I C A L I N T E R E S T S 4 . S Y M B I O T I C R E L AT I O N S H I P 2 . C O M P L I M E N TA R Y W O R K S T Y L E S 1 . P E O P L E Y O U L I K E
  18. 18. 
 What are you working on? 
 What projects are you doing that could use students? Do you work with students outside of your lab? PEERS FACULTY IN DEPT MENTOR FACULTY / STUDENTS OUTSIDE DEPT I’m a student at X working with Y. I’m interested in your work on Z. What kinds of projects are you doing?
  19. 19. Ian Gotlib Lisa Feldman Barrett Wil Cunningham Allison Harvey David Rand David Watson Steve Most Tor WagerTessa West Jamil ZakiSheri Johnson Greg Siegle Iris Mauss Sona DimidjianAngela Bryan Maya Tamir Hedy Kober Dacher KeltnerJames Gross Jeanne Tsai Tim Curran Some Lab Collaborators
  20. 20. Roadmap Dark side? What is it? Why do it? Who to do it with? How to do it?
  21. 21. Ways to Collaborate 3 . M U LT I - S T U D Y S I T E S ( B O T H C O L L E C T, M E R G E T O G E T H E R ) 4 . S H A R E Y O U R D ATA 2 . U T I L I Z E A R C H I VA L D ATA S E T 1 . D E S I G N S T U D Y T O G E T H E R
  22. 22. I. Make Contact In-person contact is essential - introduce yourself at conferences, talks II. Connection Connection through colleague or mentor. Get involved in collaborative projects with your mentor. Ask your mentor to introduce you to other researchers they know. III. Publish Demonstrate that you can get things done. This will naturally invite interest from others to work with you. IV. Cold-call email Need to be careful with this one. Clearly specify aims and resources. Consult with mentor first. How to Begin
  23. 23. I. Be kind Research karma - what goes around comes around II. Be generous If you can be helpful or do a favor, do it III. Be responsive Get your share of the work done efficiently and before an agreed upon deadline. Take initiative to get things done. IV. Transparency Clear communication is ESSENTIAL. Hands-down most important ingredient to keep collaborations healthy and thriving. How to Maintain
  24. 24. Research karma - what goes around comes around If you can be helpful or do a favor, do it Get your share of the work done efficiently and before an agreed upon deadline. Take initiative to get things done. Clear communication is ESSENTIAL. Hands-down most important ingredient to keep collaborations healthy and thriving. Transparency Continued I. RESOURCES -Who is paying for what? -How much time are people able to put into this project? -Who’s lab space will it take place in?
  25. 25. Research karma - what goes around comes around If you can be helpful or do a favor, do it Get your share of the work done efficiently and before an agreed upon deadline. Take initiative to get things done. Clear communication is ESSENTIAL. Hands-down most important ingredient to keep collaborations healthy and thriving. Transparency Continued II. TIMELINE -When will things happen (realistically) including: project inception, data collection, data analysis, manuscript writing, submission -How long between paper drafts or emails? -What other commitments do collaborators have on their plates? -How long is your turn-over time?
  26. 26. Research karma - what goes around comes around If you can be helpful or do a favor, do it Get your share of the work done efficiently and before an agreed upon deadline. Take initiative to get things done. Clear communication is ESSENTIAL. Hands-down most important ingredient to keep collaborations healthy and thriving. Transparency Continued III. AUTHORSHIP -What are expected roles? -Assuming roles go as planned, what will authorship look like?
  27. 27. Source: Eric Youngstrom
  28. 28. Research karma - what goes around comes around If you can be helpful or do a favor, do it R01 Multiple PI Leadership Plan Excerpt: “Procedures for resolving conflicts. If a potential conflict develops, the PIs shall meet and attempt to resolve the dispute. They have a strong record of attaining agreement about scientific and procedural issues over the past 10 years. Where they systematically disagree, expertise of grant consultants and collaborators will be sought.” Transparency Continued IV. RESOLVING DISAGREEMENTS -How often will we check in to see where things are at? -What if we don’t agree on something?
  29. 29. Roadmap What is it? Why do it? Who to do it with? How to do it? Dark side?
  30. 30. Dark Side of Collaborating?
  31. 31. Spreading self too thin Collaborating with a selfish person Endless when2meet polls and Skype calls Others? Dark Side of Collaborating?
  32. 32. Resources APA Monitor http://www.apa.org/monitor/feb06/collaboration.aspx The Case for Collaboration http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/ph_do/hargittai5
  33. 33. june.gruber@colorado.edu www.gruberpeplab.com

×