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SC4 Adjunct welcome back presentation

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Presented 8/15/17 by Hayley Bommarito

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SC4 Adjunct welcome back presentation

  1. 1. SC4 Library Fall 2017 Utilizing the Library to Its Fullest Potential: Research Guides, Information Literacy, and the Continuing Value of the Academic Library This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  2. 2. How to Find SC4 Library Online To find the link to the library, scroll all the way down to the bottom of SC4’s homepage (www.sc4.edu) and you will see a link that says Library. Direct link to the library home page is http://esearch.sc4.edu/library The library offers more than books - we provide research assistance, private and group study spaces, computer workstations, study tools, printing, evening tutoring, etc. – located under Services on homepage Under About on homepage are various ways to contact the library This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  3. 3. Phone • Library main: (810) 989-5640 • Toll free: (800) 553-2427 x5640 • Fax: (810) 989-5773 • SMS: (810) 515-7343 Email • library@sc4.edu - General library email • kklake@sc4.edu - Kendra Lake, Director of Library Services • jlewandoski@sc4.edu - Jane Lewandoski, Information and Education Services Librarian • bmurphey@sc4.edu - Brenan Murphey, Adjunct Reference Librarian • hjbommarito@sc4.edu - Hayley Bommarito, Adjunct Reference Librarian 24/7 Chat and Ask the library • Reference assistance is available 24 hours a day 7 days a week. • Find answers, search library FAQ, or submit your own question. Contact SC4 Library This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  4. 4. SC4 Library Home Page The Quick Links box and the box under the library’s hours contain frequently-used links and helpful information. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  5. 5. SC4 Library Resources SC4 Library collects many different kinds of information: General Information - sources for everyone (general public, students, faculty) Professional Information - specialized sources for professionals in different fields or students studying those professions Scholarly Information - sources for faculty and students who are studying and researching different topics and courses of study This information comes in many forms: Books (reference and circulating) E-books Periodicals (journals, newspapers, magazines, etc.) Course reserves Streaming video and audio Over 200 research, image, and subject- specific databases CD’s and DVD’s Articles, doctoral theses, archival materials, trade publications, etc. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  6. 6. Information Literacy (IL) Program and services - information about the IL program and how to book an IL session Inter-library loan request forms - If our library does not have a resource, another library may lend it to us Library recommendation forms - The library values your recommendations and welcomes your requests for additions to our collection Course reserves, e-reserves, and textbooks - You can submit a course reserves request online, including electronic resources and textbooks Resource delivery request - Faculty can request that items be delivered to their office or classroom Assignment alert form - If you anticipate your students needing library resources for an assignment, fill out the online form so the library can be prepared for whatever you’ll need Copyright information, OER, and professional development tools SC4 Library Faculty Resources This work is icensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  7. 7. OneSearch - searches everything in the library, both physical materials and electronic resources Databases - the best places to find academic-quality articles, among many other resources such as charts, graphs, images, and maps E-books and E-journals - the library has access to thousands of e-books and e- journals Audiovisual Materials - not just CD’s and DVD’s! The library also has streaming videos, audio files, conference proceedings, and much more Library Catalog - search for books, periodicals, or AV materials that are in the library Library Research Guides - customizable, multi-purpose web-based resources Research at SC4 Library This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  8. 8. The Convenient, Useful Resource You Never Knew You Needed Research Guides Image: @followsc4. “#TBT to what our library looked in 1950. A little bit more high tech today.” Twitter, Oct. 27, 2016 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  9. 9. SC4 Library Research Guides On the library home page, the research guides are located in the Quick Links section as well as under the “Search” option on the upper left. The research guides are divided into different categories as shown above, and can be searched by keyword. Direct link to all research guides is http://esearch.sc4.edu/guides This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  10. 10. How-To Research Guides can be very helpful. The library has several how-to guides, including how to cite, how to conduct research, and how to find your way around the library. Research Guides contain many different types of resources pertaining to the course or subject, as well as recommended databases, and most even have links to reliable web sources. A Library Research Guide is a web resource containing carefully curated materials that is developed by a librarian or librarians to aid the student or user in finding credible, scholarly, useful information. Research Guides can be tailored to specific subjects, departments, or courses, and can be linked to assignments or projects. Embedded videos, podcast & Twitter feeds, document files, etc. can also be added. What is a Library Research Guide? This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  11. 11. Saves time and reduces stress - The library has hundreds of thousands of print & electronic resources. A research guide brings together all of the best refined, appropriate, and subject-specific content in one place. Reliable, expert information - The librarians at SC4 create the research guides using the most current, credible, and scholarly resources available. Databases - Nearly all research guides, particularly subject and department guides, have a list of pertinent databases-helpful when we have over 200 to choose from! Find answers - The research guides help with more than just research. Citation help, writing tips, study tools, and test-taking advice can also be found. Why Use Library Research Guides? This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  12. 12. Accessible – Content can be accessed 24/7 from any device anywhere with an internet connection. Interactive – Any part of the guides can be printed and used as handouts, and chat technology is integrated into most guides. Combines many different types of resources in one place – Not only do research guides contain library resources, but also RSS and podcast links to useful, credible websites or blogs, streaming video/audio, and many other kinds of sources. Easily updated or modified – The research guides can be edited at any point, and we keep them as current and up to date as possible. For example, a research guide could be updated before, during, or after any semester, or edited to include an upcoming assignment. Why Use Library Research Guides? This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  13. 13. Library research guides are rich sources of information and direction. For example, a student in the Emergency Services program with an assignment for a research paper or another type of project requiring scholarly sources refer to the Emergency Services research guide for guidance and tips. The guides also provide additional information and resources, such as government websites, multimedia and streaming resources, and often offer citation tips and search strategy help. Using more than one guide is also beneficial to the student. For example, if student in a U.S. history class has to write a research paper on the civil rights movement, the student could turn to both the U.S History research guide as well as the Selma research guide or the African American History research guide. How Do I Use Library Research Guides? This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  14. 14. ~ Information and resources are clearly organized and the layout of the research guides, though it may vary slightly, is very user- friendly and intuitive ~ Convenient for students who cannot (or will not) make the trip in to the library, as the guides can be accessed 24/7 from anywhere using any device ~ Excellent for online courses, as online students can find the information they need without having to dig through irrelevant sources or learn the entire library site ~Provide reliable, scholarly, and appropriate information and resources for further study ~Visual presentation of multiple resources and their different formats, including embedded videos and RSS feeds ~Demonstrate to students that there is almost always trustworthy, available information on nearly any given topic Benefits of Research Guides for Students This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  15. 15. Library Databases The Open, Free Web When to Use  Best for college level research.  Best for credible information quickly.  Best for full-text, scholarly articles.  Best for shopping and entertainment.  Good for finding statistics.  Good place to find background information. Reliability  Articles and books written by journalists or experts in a professional field.  All material in database is evaluated for accuracy and credibility by subject experts.  Reviewed and updated regularly.  No standards in place. Anyone can publish their opinions and ideas on the Internet.  Much of the information found on the free Web is NOT evaluated for accuracy and reliability.  Use the ABCD’s checklist to evaluate resources (authority, bias, content, design). Accessibility  Library database subscriptions are paid for through your tuition and state taxes.  To access the Library databases from off-campus, you will need to logon with your username and password.  Information is often free.  When information does come from a legitimate source or publisher the user usually has to pay to access it. Usability  User can specify advanced search criteria; full-text, date, scholarly, format, etc.  Results can be further filtered for precision.  Databases usually include a citation tool to automatically create a citation for the article.  Lack of subject focus results in irrelevant.  User must wade through a “grab bag” of thousands to millions of results.  Most web sites found on the Internet do not have a citation tool. Stability  Published content from journals, magazines, newspapers and books does not change.  Most material remains in database for a significant length of time and can be easily retrieved again.  Web site content can often change.  Web pages and sites may disappear for a number of reasons. May not be able to retrieve the same content at a later time. Library Databases vs The Open Web Table: Reynolds Community College Library, libguides.reynolds.edu/c.php?g=143583&p=939857.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  16. 16. Encourage your students to visit the library and consult with the reference librarian. Make sure your students know about the wide variety of available library resources, including print, electronic, and multimedia sources. Suggest specific databases or other library materials (such as the exact title of a book or journal article) that will assist your students in their research. Explain what kind of research you expect in your course and describe how you will be evaluating the students’ research. Use the CRAAP Test or a similar method for evaluating information sources. Discuss academic integrity and plagiarism, as well as what citation style you expect the students to use. Request a research or course guide from the librarians, or schedule an IL session. How to Improve Student Research This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  17. 17. The Essential Skills Today’s College Students Need Image: https://mrmcdanielsteacherpage.wikispaces.com/parents Information Literacy This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  18. 18. What is Information Literacy? "Information literacy is the the set of integrated abilities encompassing the reflective discovery of information, the understanding of how information is produced and valued, and the use of information in creating new knowledge and participating ethically in communities of learning." (ACRL, 2015) Image: http://infolit.org/information-literacy-projects-and-programsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  19. 19. “If literacy is the ability to read, interpret, and produce texts valued in a community, then academic information literacy is the ability to read, interpret, and produce information valued in academia — a skill that must be developed by all students during their college education.” (Elmborg, 2006). Information literacy not only provides students with research and general library skills, but also with media, technological, and internet literacy, critical thinking skills, and knowledge of information ethics. Information literacy enables students to effectively learn how to learn as well as to become lifelong and perhaps even lifelong library users. Information Literacy This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  20. 20. The SC4 Library Information Literacy Program shows students how to: • Access the library’s e-resources 24/7 from any device with Internet access. • Differentiate between magazine and scholarly journal articles. • Use the library databases to find peer reviewed articles. • Evaluate Internet websites. • Create advanced database and Internet searching strategies. • Identify elements of an MLA citation. • Cite sources responsibly. • Create a works cited page using RefWorks. Information Literacy at SC4 Library Image: http://hlwiki.slais.ubc.ca/index.php/Media_literacyThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  21. 21. Summary of ACRL Report Documented Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success (Brown, 2016) Libraries play an important role in helping students survive their first year at college. Students who received some kind of instruction from librarians in their first year do better in their courses than those who don’t. Students who use libraries tend to stay in college, graduate, and get better grades than those who don’t. Students benefited when libraries partnered with other departments that support students such as writing centers and academic enrichment programs. Library information literacy programs can positively affect the goals of general education learning outcomes such as critical thinking, problem solving and civic engagement. Libraries were able to demonstrate an encouraging connection between library instruction and retention, engagement, and overall academic experience. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  22. 22. Information Literacy Assessment at SC4 In 2015, ACRL adopted the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education focusing on six threshold concepts to serve as "passageways or portals to enlarged understanding or ways of thinking and practicing within that discipline." •Authority Is Constructed and Contextual •Information Creation as a Process •Information Has Value •Research as Inquiry •Scholarship as Conversation •Searching as Strategic Exploration This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  23. 23. Before the Framework, from 2000 to 2015, SC4 adhered to the six Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education as written by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL). The librarians at SC4 have incorporated the Framework into the Information Literacy Program in 2017-18 with the following expected student learning outcome: The reference librarians meet at least once every semester to review and revise the program based on the assessment reports, student and faculty comments regarding the program, and information obtained through professional development events or readings. Information Literacy Assessment at SC4 This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  24. 24. An information literate individual is able to: Determine the extent of the information needed. (ACRL Standard One) Access the needed information effectively and efficiently. (ACRL Standard Two) Evaluate information and its sources critically. (ACRL Standard Three) Incorporate selected information into one’s knowledge base. (ACRL Standard Four) Use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose. (ACRL Standard Five) Understand the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information and and use information ethically and legally. (ACRL Standard Six) SC4 & the Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education as written by the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) [Followed by SC4 2000-2015] Ths work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  25. 25. “Information literacy forms the basis for lifelong learning, which is essential to the mission of higher education institutions” (ACRL, 2000). “Information literacy helps develop individuals' intellectual abilities of reasoning and critical thinking and enables them to learn how to learn” 2006). “Several recent studies focusing on the impact of information literacy on the academic performance of students indicated that information literacy instruction and student information literacy skills were positively correlated with the student grade point (GPAs), retention and graduation rates” (Shao and Purpur, 2016). Information Literacy Student Success This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  26. 26. Information Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills • Disciplined, and evaluates all information • Analytical and able to combine and identify information • Open-minded, inquisitive, and logical Information literacy and critical thinking skills are closely connected. Both require thinking that is: Image: Critical Thinking in Information Literacy Program. Gabrielle Wong, May 2010. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  27. 27. Help students develop the skills to find, organize, and evaluate any information for credibility, relevancy, and currency Show students any available discipline- specific resources, such as Board Vitals or other databases Assist students in learning to methodically approach the research of potentially unfamiliar subjects or topics Technological literacy does not always equal information literacy-it is vital to know how to find information without using a smartphone Critical Thinking Skills = Information Literacy The library can complement your course, research paper, assignment or project in several different ways: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  28. 28. “…a national survey of business and nonprofit leaders by the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) was [that] 93% of surveyed employers would like their future employees to demonstrate critical thinking, communication and complex problem solving skills, and the business leaders considered these skills more important than a student's major” (Soria et al, 2013). The Value of Information Literacy Programs This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  29. 29. “Students must learn how information functions in proof or argument, and why that information is accepted while other information is not. Ultimately, students need to produce information that meets the community's standards. ” (Elmborg, 2006) Both faculty and librarians can foster “the development of critical thinking, information literacy, and lifelong learning skills in well as engagement with diversity, information ethics, access to information, commodification of information, labor, academic freedom, human rights, engaged citizenry, and neoliberalism.” (Garcia, 2016) “Students need to analyze information, not just collect it…the ability to gather information, examine multiple perspectives, then re-evaluate prior beliefs… must be reinforced across the curriculum. It's a skill necessary for civic life as well.” (Najmabadi, 2017) The Value of Information Literacy Programs This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  30. 30. Develop advanced searching strategies and know how to use Boolean operators. Differentiate between scholarly and general information sources. Locate primary sources & learn how to use library databases. Evaluate all information, and Internet websites in particular. Understand copyright and citations while avoiding plagiarism. Develop critical thinking skills and learn to identify fake news/information. Use bibliographic management software (RefWorks) to manage collected info. Information Literacy Sessions at SC4 Library Why book an IL session? An instructive and interactive IL session will assist students in accomplishing the following: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  31. 31. Information Literacy Sessions at SC4 Library Assessment evidence incorporates both an individual response system pre- and post- information literacy class quiz and students’ score on the ENG 101 library worksheet. Questions on the pre- and post-IL quiz and the ENG 101 worksheet are directly related to performance indicators and outcomes for the ACRL standards which help determine whether the standard has been met. All students who complete the ENG 101 IL program are also encouraged to submit an anonymous survey regarding the program. The results demonstrate that after attending the IL class, students were better able to critically and effectively evaluate sources for relevance and usefulness and use them ethically. Students also improved the following skills: • Identifying the elements of the citation • Identifying characteristics of a scholarly journal versus a general magazine • Using Boolean operators and other techniques to refine their searches • Recognizing the need to cite direct quotes and paraphrased material This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  32. 32. Why the Library is Still a Vital Resource in the 21st Century College The Value of the Academic Library This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  33. 33. ACRL 2016 Assessment in Action (AiA) of Academic Libraries This report showed positive connections between the library and student learning and success five areas that are particularly significant: 1. “Students benefit from library instruction in their initial coursework. Information literacy instruction provided to students during their initial coursework helps them perform better in their courses than students who do not.” (Brown, 2016). • Studies consistently show that first-year college students were more successful in their academic careers, more likely to continue college, and more likely to graduate. (Soria et al, 2013) • Library skills are really life skills-useful in many aspects of everyday life beyond simple research or looking for a book. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  34. 34. 2.“Library use increases student success. Students who used the library in some way (e.g., circulation, library instruction session attendance, online database access, study room use, interlibrary loan) achieved higher levels of academic success (e.g., GPA, grades, retention) than students who did not use the library.” (Brown, 2016). • “Students who use the library had an average GPA of 3.18 compared with the GPA of students who did not use the library, which was 2.98.” (Soria et al, 2013). • The library is one of the most valuable and yet most under-used resources. students to explore it, both physically and online. ACRL 2016 Assessment in Action (AiA) of Academic Libraries This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  35. 35. ACRL 2016 Assessment in Action (AiA) of Academic Libraries 3. “Collaborative academic programs and services involving the library enhance student learning. Academic library partnerships with other campus units, such as the writing center, academic enrichment, and speech lab, yield positive benefits for students (e.g., higher grades, academic confidence, retention).” (Brown, 2016) • The library currently partners closely with the English dept., the Center, including WAT, the Achievement Center, and many of the health sciences, among others.This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  36. 36. 4. “Information literacy instruction strengthens general education outcomes. Library instruction improves students’ achievement of institutional core competencies and general education outcomes such inquiry-based and problem-solving learning, including effective identification and use of information, critical thinking, ethical reasoning, and civic engagement.” (Brown, 2016) • Library instruction is so valuable because it’s useful in every single of academic life, every course, every paper, and most assignments projects. ACRL 2016 Assessment in Action (AiA) of Academic Libraries This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  37. 37. 5. “Library research consultations boost student learning. One-on-one or small-group reference and research assistance with a librarian enhances academic success, as documented by such factors as student confidence, GPAs, and improved achievement on course assignments.” (Brown, 2016) • Countless studies have shown the connection between library instruction and student outcomes. In your own courses, it is impossible to teach a semester’s worth material in one class session, just as it is difficult to teach all there is to know about the library, research, and information literacy in one 1 ½ hour IL session, but we can cover the important basics and give the students guidance and tips for successful library research. ACRL 2016 Assessment in Action (AiA) of Academic Libraries This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  38. 38. “The AiA projects continue to build evidence of promise for library impact in four areas which have yielded promising results about positive connections between the library and students’ academic success: • The library contributes to improved student retention. • Library instruction adds value to a student’s long- term academic experience. • The library promotes academic rapport and student engagement. • Use of library space relates positively to student learning and success.” ACRL 2016 AiA of Academic Libraries (Malenfant, 2017) This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  39. 39. “The library is the physical manifestation of the core values and activities of academic life.” (Kuh and Gonyea, 2015) In today’s world of rampant fake news, questionable websites, and general misinformation, the library is a vital tool in helping students recognize truth, facts, and credibility. There is also an extraordinary wealth of easily accessible information today. With such a vast amount of information out there, the library is essential because it maintains, collects, and organizes it all, while helping students find, evaluate, and use the best information available. Today’s Academic Library This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  40. 40. Learn new ideas, review old ones, and make discoveries Study, research, and think in a quiet atmosphere Collaborate with classmates and share ideas Produce thoughtfully-researched work Generate and pose new concepts and ideas The Future of the Academic Library As we know, the library is more than just a house for books. Libraries are spaces where the student can: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  41. 41. “Never have our academic librarians been more essential to the core educational, discovery, and service mission of our institutions as during the current political climate.” (Kim, 2017) The ACRL’s statement on Intellectual Freedom Principles supports the privacy of library users, the freedom of information and creative expression, ease of access, and are based generally on the 1st and 4th amendments of the Bill of Rights. The IFP also states: “The development of library collections in support of an institution’s instruction and research programs should transcend the personal values of the selector...it is essential Another significant principle is: “A service philosophy should be promoted that equal access to information for all in the academic community with no discrimination on the basis of race, values, gender, sexual orientation, cultural or ethnic background, physical or learning disability, economic status, religious beliefs, or Academic Libraries & Intellectual Freedom Academic libraries have always supported free speech and the value of a free press. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  42. 42. Questions/Comments? Please let me or one of the other librarians know if there are any ways we can better support your courses, your students, or your own research. We are always happy to help and we look forward to a productive, collaborative, and exciting fall semester. Thank You! This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  43. 43. • Brown, Karen with contributions by Kara J. Malenfant. “Documented Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success: Building Evidence with Team-Based Assessment in Action Campus Projects.” Association of College and Research Libraries. April, 2016. • “Changing Roles of Academic and Research Libraries.” This essay derives from a Roundtable on Technology and Change in Academic Libraries, convened by the Association of College and Research Libraries on November 2–3, 2006 in Chicago(2006). • Elmborg, James. "Critical Information Literacy: Implications for Instructional Practice." The Journal of Academic Librarianship, vol. 32, no. 2, Mar. 2006, p. 192-199. • Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education 2015, American Library Association, American College & Research Libraries Association. • Garcia, Kenny. "Keeping Up With. Critical Librarianship." ACRL, American Library Association, 2016. • "Intellectual Freedom Principles for Academic Libraries: An Interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights." Association of College and Research Libraries, American Library Association, 12 July 2000. Works Cited This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
  44. 44. • Kim, Joshua. "Principles, Values, and the Academic Library in the Age of Trump." Inside Higher Ed, 30 Jan. 2017. • Kuh, George D., and Robert M. Gonyea. "The Role of the Academic Library in Promoting Student Engagement in Learning." College & Research Libraries, vol. 76, no. 3, 2015, pp. 359. • Malenfant, Kara. "New ACRL Report Highlights Library Contributions to Student Learning and Success." Association of College and Research Libraries, 10 May 2017. • Najmabadi, Shannon. "Information Literacy." The Chronicle of Higher Education, 2017, ProQuest Central • Shao, Xiaorong and Geraldine Purpur. "Effects of Information Literacy Skills on Student Writing and Course Performance." Journal of Academic Librarianship, vol. 42, no. 6, Nov. 2016, pp. 670-678. • Soria, K. M., Fransen, J., & Nackerud, S. “Library use and undergraduate student outcomes: New evidence for students' retention and academic success.” Portal : Libraries and the Academy, vol. 13, no. 2, 2013, pp. 147-164. Works Cited This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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