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HANDMADE WELLBEING IN A
CARE CENTRE FOR OLDER
PEOPLE
Mari Salovaara, Doctoral
Student
Craft Teacher Education
University o...
CRITICAL
MOMENT
” I say, we are
artists. We are still
able to do
something!”
THE STUDY
How do guided craft
activities promote the sense
of control of the older
people in a care centre?
THE BIG
PICTURE
International Erasmus+ -
project Handmade Wellbeing
Developing an educational
model
to coach arts & crafts...
THEORETICAL
BACKGROUND
Wellbeing in later life
Crafts & wellbeing
WELLBEING IN LATER LIFE
Engagement in life is very important (Rowe & Kahn, 1997)
 Social relations
 Meaningful activitie...
CRAFTS & WELLBEING
Inward
 Pleasure in multisensory,
creative making
 Cognitive challenge &
accomplishment
 Distraction...
THE DESIGN
Setting & participants
The data
Role of the researcher
Analysis
SETTING & PARTICIPANTS
Craft workshops in a care centre, 2 departments
1. Day activity centre for older people with memory...
THE DATA
Video recorded workshops: 856
minutes
 Standing camera to film the whole
situation
 Moving camera to focus on d...
ANALYSIS (IN PROGRESS)
Now
Content log
 Rough description of events
 2 minute sections
 Standing camera videos
Making n...
SOME NOTIONS
Sense of control in the
making
Control of interaction
SENSE OF CONTROL IN THE
MAKING
Making was rewarding for
everyone!
Modes of participation could be
adapted
Intensity of eng...
SENSE OF CONTROL IN
INTERACTION
Different kinds of needs and
ways of interaction were
allowed
Making crafts facilitates
di...
WHAT’S NEXT?
More data; 2nd cycle
Fall 2016
2 departments
Preparation of the workshops is
modified
Role of the researcher?...
REFERENCES
Cohen, G. D., Perlstein, S., Chapline, J., Kelly, J., Firth, K. M., & Simmens, S. (2006). The impact of
profess...
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Handmade wellbeing in a care centre for older people

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Presentation at International NordFo Conference Make It Now, on September 29th 2016 in University of Turku, Department of Teacher Education in Rauma.

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Handmade wellbeing in a care centre for older people

  1. 1. HANDMADE WELLBEING IN A CARE CENTRE FOR OLDER PEOPLE Mari Salovaara, Doctoral Student Craft Teacher Education University of Helsinki
  2. 2. CRITICAL MOMENT ” I say, we are artists. We are still able to do something!”
  3. 3. THE STUDY How do guided craft activities promote the sense of control of the older people in a care centre?
  4. 4. THE BIG PICTURE International Erasmus+ - project Handmade Wellbeing Developing an educational model to coach arts & crafts professionals to design and carry out craft activities for older people in care centres 3 perspectives, 3 substudies The older participants The student teachers The educators
  5. 5. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND Wellbeing in later life Crafts & wellbeing
  6. 6. WELLBEING IN LATER LIFE Engagement in life is very important (Rowe & Kahn, 1997)  Social relations  Meaningful activities Experiencing sense of control and meaningful social engagement result in positive health outcomes in older adults (Cohen et al., 2006; Rodin, 1986) Feeling enabled, in control & connected with others
  7. 7. CRAFTS & WELLBEING Inward  Pleasure in multisensory, creative making  Cognitive challenge & accomplishment  Distraction from negative thoughts  Relaxation and / or flow experiences Outward  Attending to and influencing the physical environment  Promoting social interaction  Validation from others Feeling enabled, in control & connected with others (e.g. Liddle, Parkinson, & Sibbritt, 2013; Maidment & Macfarlane, 2011; Pöllänen, 2012; Reynolds, 2010)
  8. 8. THE DESIGN Setting & participants The data Role of the researcher Analysis
  9. 9. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS Craft workshops in a care centre, 2 departments 1. Day activity centre for older people with memory disorders living at home  6 participants  Age 85-89 (3), 90-94 (3)  6 workshops in 3 weeks 2. Residential psychogeriatric department, mental disorders  4 participants  Age 70-74 (2), 80-84 (2)  9 workshops in 3 weeks All female
  10. 10. THE DATA Video recorded workshops: 856 minutes  Standing camera to film the whole situation  Moving camera to focus on details Day activity centre  4 recorded workshops  Standing camera 394 minutes  Moving camera 98 minutes Residential psychogeriatric department  6 recorded workshops  Standing camera 233 minutes
  11. 11. ANALYSIS (IN PROGRESS) Now Content log  Rough description of events  2 minute sections  Standing camera videos Making notes Next Watching the videos over and over Finding interesting segments  Theory driven: mastering the making, social interaction, engagement, accomplishment, etc.  Data driven: something else that catches my eye
  12. 12. SOME NOTIONS Sense of control in the making Control of interaction
  13. 13. SENSE OF CONTROL IN THE MAKING Making was rewarding for everyone! Modes of participation could be adapted Intensity of engagement could be adapted
  14. 14. SENSE OF CONTROL IN INTERACTION Different kinds of needs and ways of interaction were allowed Making crafts facilitates different ways of participating a group The participants expressed that gathering together was important
  15. 15. WHAT’S NEXT? More data; 2nd cycle Fall 2016 2 departments Preparation of the workshops is modified Role of the researcher?? No moving camera Outsider or participator? Article out spring 2017
  16. 16. REFERENCES Cohen, G. D., Perlstein, S., Chapline, J., Kelly, J., Firth, K. M., & Simmens, S. (2006). The impact of professionally conducted cultural programs on the physical health, mental health, and social functioning of older adults. The Gerontologist, 46(6), 726–734. Gold, R. L. (1958). Roles in Sociological Field Observations. Social Forces, 36(3), 217–223. Heath, C., Hindmarsh, J., & Luff, P. (2010). Video in Qualitative Research. Using Video Psychological and Social Applications, 184. Liddle, J. L. M., Parkinson, L., & Sibbritt, D. W. (2013). Purpose and pleasure in late life: Conceptualising older women’s participation in art and craft activities. Journal of Aging Studies, 27(4), 330–338. Maidment, J., & Macfarlane, S. (2011). Crafting Communities: Promoting Inclusion, Empowerment, and Learning between Older Women. Australian Social Work, 64(March 2015), 283–298. Pöllänen, S. (2012). The meaning of craft: Craft makers’ descriptions of craft as an occupation. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 8128(January 2011), 1–11. Reynolds, F. (2010). “Colour and communion”: Exploring the influences of visual art-making as a leisure activity on older women’s subjective well-being. Journal of Aging Studies, 24(2), 135–143. Rodin, J. (1986). Aging and Health: Effects of the Sense of Control. Science, 233(4770), 1271–1276. Rowe, J. W., & Kahn, R. L. (1997). Successful Aging. The Gerontologist, 37(4), 433–440.

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