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Leading a Culture of Rigor

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Presentation give at Fortify 2016: Strengthening Teachers and Leaders hosted by the Ayers Institute for Teacher Learning & Innovation at Lipscomb University.

Dr. Hank Staggs, Governor's Academy for School Leadership - Tennessee Department of Education

Published in: Education
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Leading a Culture of Rigor

  1. 1. Leading a culture of rigor Hank staggs, Ed.d.
  2. 2. Check-in One new friend One word of transparency (Here is how I am showing up today…) One word of encouragement (i.e. I am so inspired by your…Your students are so fortunate for your… )
  3. 3. Session Goals Share what rigor in the classroom looks like Share ways in which school leaders can build a culture of rigor Share practical examples of rigor tools Hear from expert wisdom in the group Learn at least one new thing
  4. 4. Session Norm Everyone engaged Monitor technology so that it is not disruptive Monitor personal wake in the room Everyone has timeout authority (see Norm handout)
  5. 5. Practical, quick, and Efficient Ways to lead rigor???? • Use the Data. Look at your curve and ensure rigor. • Have regular lesson plan checks. Look for rigor. • Work with individual teachers and review rigor. Point out rigor in the TEAM rubric. Match to their lesson plans. (Micromanaging is not all bad.) • Have a personal system for reviewing student work. Look for rigor. • Structure more time in class. More time, more rigor. • Set minimum homework requirements. More work, more rigor. • Try new and different strategies. Newer and more strategies, more rigor.
  6. 6. As the school leader, there are no practical, quick, efficient, or easy ways to insure ongoing high quality rigorous instruction in the classroom. You don’t “do it”, you “grow it” with your own DNA. Discuss at your table
  7. 7. For school improvement and change School leaders must grow a culture, not unbox it.
  8. 8. structure Structure alone does not transform or improve schools. What are examples of structures we have tried in schools? Why did these work or not work?
  9. 9. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  10. 10. Effective leaders set norms Vision Ethical Define what you expect Make clear the what, not the how Collectively establish school-wide norms
  11. 11. rigor How do we define rigor?
  12. 12. rigor Rigor = students engaged in challenging content No engagement = no rigor No challenge = no rigor
  13. 13. Where do you see rigor?
  14. 14. Picture time… What does it look like when students are engaged? What does it look like when students are challenged?
  15. 15. Challenge and engagement connection “…the odds of students engaging in their lessons in what they named most challenging are 90% higher than the odds in the lessons students identify as least challenging.” (Yair, 2000)
  16. 16. Norms for rigor What norms (expectations) should be established in order to grow a culture of rigor?
  17. 17. Example Norms for rigor All students are engaged in learning All students are challenged at their own level of discomfort No student is allowed to fail Learning is more important than teaching Adults are continual learners Others?
  18. 18. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership & Collaboration Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  19. 19. Collaborative Culture
  20. 20. Triangle Activity Look at triangle for 30 seconds No talking No writing Remember as much as you can
  21. 21. F J R N U L A O S P EV D X CY K T G W B I Q M H
  22. 22. Think time / Note taking time
  23. 23. Triangle Activity Individual Score Table Group Score New Triangle – plan with group 30 seconds
  24. 24. Triangle Activity Look at triangle for 30 seconds No talking No writing Remember as much as you can
  25. 25. C V T O M B H P K S A E D G X R L W F N Q I J Z U
  26. 26. Think time / Note taking time
  27. 27. Triangle Activity Individual Score Table Group Score New Triangle – with collaboration
  28. 28. Create a culture of teacher leadership & Collaboration  Micromanagement is out  Autonomy and “Save the Day” leaders offer compliance not commitment and often lack sustainability in culture change  The job of principal is difficult and not sustainable one teacher at a time.  “Every teacher needs a pack to carry.” - Joe Murphy
  29. 29. How can we leverage teacher leadership and collaboration to insure rigorous instruction?
  30. 30. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  31. 31. Rigorous academic program Relentless focus on learning Guaranteed and viable curriculum (Marzano) Opportunity to learn – ALL students Time to learn Challenging courses
  32. 32. “Challenge is always a moving target, increasing as the skills and knowledge of the learners are strengthened.The critical issue is challenging students at the correct level.” (Murphy, 2016, p.68)
  33. 33. Rigorous academic program Closing the achievement gap… What disproportionately advantages low income and at- risk students more than any other factor? -Opportunity to learn and quality instruction
  34. 34. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  35. 35. Quality instruction that challenges students Where is rigor in the TEAM rubric? Admin rubric Instructional rubric
  36. 36. Quality instruction that challenges students Where is rigor in the TEAM instructional rubric?
  37. 37. Quality instruction that challenges students Where is rigor in the TEAM Admin rubric? A1 Capacity Building
  38. 38. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  39. 39. How are you planning to “show up” ? Mentor Evaluator Supervisor Expert Spy Coach Consultant
  40. 40. The coaching zone Model Give Advice Developmental Relationship Listening Paraphrasing Questioning Positive Intent Goals Action Plans Ongoing Assessment, Support and Feedback
  41. 41. Coaching Styles Bacon & Spear, Adaptive Coaching Directive Facilitative They help by instructing and advising; by sharing their knowledge, experience, and perspective; and giving feedback and corrective suggestions on what they’ve observed They help by asking insightful questions and listening; by stimulating their subordinates to think, reflect, and explore; and by helping others observe themselves and learn from their own experiences.
  42. 42. Dr. Mark Cannon Directive vs. facilitative coaching
  43. 43. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  44. 44. Care for kids “Care is the central pillar of school improvement.” (Murphy, 2016, p. 90)
  45. 45. Eyes of the school principal Academic Press Care for kids
  46. 46. Growing a culture of…….rigor Norms Teacher Leadership Rigorous Academic program Quality instruction that challenges students Coaching approach Care for students
  47. 47. Examples in practice of looking at rigor Rigor ruler - Hamblen County Schools,TN
  48. 48. Questions? Hank.Staggs@TN.gov Governors Academy for School Leadership
  49. 49. Lunch Ticket Find your new friend and share the one thing you learned.
  50. 50. Resources  Fullan, M. (2014). The Principal:Three Keys to Maximizing Impact. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.  Kee, K., & National Staff Development Council (U.S.). (2010). RESULTS coaching:The new essential for school leaders. Thousand Oaks, Calif: Corwin Press.  Marzano, R. J. (2003). What works in schools:Translating research into action.Alexandria,Va:Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.  Marzano, R. J.,Waters,T., & McNulty, B.A. (2005). School leadership that works: From research to results.Alexandria,Va: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.  Murphy, J. (2016). Leading School Improvement:A Framework for Action.West Palm Beach, FL: Learning Sciences International.  Rigor Ruler, Hamblen County Schools,TN. Used by permission.  Yair, G. (2000). Not Just AboutTime: Instructional practices and productive time in school. Educational Administration Quarterly, 36(4), 485-512.

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