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Adobe Mobile Marketing Japan Topline

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Adobe Mobile Marketing Japan Topline

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Adobe Mobile Marketing Japan Topline

  1. 1. 1 Mobile Marketing Research – Japan Market Methodology On behalf of Adobe, Advanis surveyed 1,000 adult consumers in Japan between January 2nd and 10th , 2019. All consumers surveyed were required to own a smart phone. The survey explores the use of mobile devices for a variety of activities, the use of small screen vs. large screen devices, and the use of voice assistance. This survey was also conducted in the US, UK, France, Germany, ANZ (Australia & New Zealand), India, Brazil, and Mexico. Full results are available at https://portal.advanis.net/adbe. Highlights • Computers are the most common technology device used by Japanese workers. • When at home, Japanese men rely on a computer while women are more likely to rely on a smartphone. • Japanese consumers are most likely to disagree that they prefer to interact in person. They are twice as likely to say this compared to other regions surveyed. • Japanese consumers are much less likely than consumers from other regions to ‘constantly/frequently’ do some common activities on their smartphones – such as composing email, checking social media, or listening to music. • While Japanese customers are doing much more traffic monitoring/mapping than they were a few years ago (more than many other regions), the growth in other activities, such as mobile banking, scanning of documents, email, or touch ID, has only grown modestly over the past year or two. • Only half of Japanese consumers feel that they can do all the retail activities that they want to on mobile, significantly lower than many other regions. • Women are generally more likely than men to use a smartphone to conduct retail activities, while men rely on their computer. • When asked how well marketers today give offers and information for the right product/service, at the right time, only one quarter of Japanese consumers say most or lots of the offers they receive are right for them – although this is high among the regions tested. Most say marketers are doing an ok job, but there is room for improvement. Japanese are also the most likely to say they don’t want to be bothered by receiving offers - they find them intrusive.
  2. 2. 2 • Japanese customers are largely indifferent on the use of a mobile browser or mobile app for most activities. • Two-thirds of Japanese consumers never or rarely use voice commands to speak to their devices – at 12%, they are half as likely as consumers in other regions to do so.
  3. 3. 3 Typical Daily Usage: Work Usage During the work/school day, computers are the most common technology device used by Japanese workers, while one quarter of the workday is completed with no device usage. Virtually all Japanese workers (84%) have a work issued computer, but only 1 in 5 use it often for personal activities. Home Usage Japanese are equally likely, when at home, to rely on a computer or a smartphone. But this is driven by strong gender differences - men in Japan are much more likely than women to own a variety of technology devices, particularly computers, tablets, gaming consoles, and smart devices. When at home, men are more likely to rely on a desktop/laptop (59%), while women rely on their smartphone (55%). Fewer differences by age emerge. The majority of Japanese consumers use more than one device at the same time either constantly (20%) or frequently (36%). Millennials are more likely to frequently or constantly use multiple devices at once. Device Preferences for Online Activities With the exception of planning a workout and composing an email, Japanese (particularly women and Gen Z / Millennials) prefer to do a host of common online activities on their smartphone (e.g., make calls, post to social media, listen to music, play games). While women do prefer to compose emails on their smartphone, men are equally likely to prefer phone or computer. For those who prefer to use a computer for typical online activities, fewer than one third would wait until they get home to use a computer rather than use a smartphone while they’re out. Japanese are unlikely to start an activity on mobile and finish it on computer – half do this ‘sometimes’ and only 1 in 5 do it often. 27% 2% 49% 4% 18% What proportion of your work/school day do you spend using... No device Other device Computer Tablet Smartphone
  4. 4. 4 About 3 in 10 Japanese have a strong preference for computer, and this is because of a preference for a larger screen and full keyboard, and to a lesser extent because they feel that websites work better on computer than on mobile. The majority of Japanese consumers somewhat agree with each of the following statements: There are very few differences in agreement between men and women, although men are more likely to say that they would like a single device that can ‘do everything’. Millennials would like this as well. Similarly, there are few differences by age for the statements above. 4% 8% 9% 14% 13% 5% 18% 15% 25% 50% 58% 56% 54% 52% 33% 34% 17% 22% 9% I need a device with me when I am on the go I like to see/touch things before I buy I prefer to interact with people in person I would like a single device that can do everything I prefer to connect with people via text/social media How much do you agree or disagree that... Strongly disagree Somewhat disagree Somewhat agree Strongly agree
  5. 5. 5 Smartphone Use Japanese consumers are much less likely than consumers from other regions to ‘constantly/frequently’ do some common activities on their smartphones. For example, only 31% send texts constantly/frequently (compared to an average of 67% across all regions), 8% make video calls (26% in all regions), 33% listen to music (48% in all regions), 28% compose email (43% in all regions) and 44% check social media (60% in all regions). There are many activities that Japanese do more often on mobile than even a few years ago, as shown in the graph below. Mapping/GPS has seen the largest growth, while many other tasks have only seen modest growth. While there are very few differences in the uptake of mobile activities across ages, there are substantial differences by gender, with men more likely than women to be doing nearly all of the activities on this list more than they were 1-2 years ago. 53% 31% 26% 21% 20% 19% 16% 16% 15% 15% 13% 13% 11% 9% 8% 7% 5% 4% 2% 20% Monitor traffic / GPS / Mapping Use touch ID or face recognition Scan / take photos of documents Track my health stats / steps / heart rate Send money via app (e.g., Apple Pay, Venmo) Synch documents from mobile to computer Watching TV shows Use my device as a WiFi hotspot Banking / remote check deposit Composing an email or text using voice Share my location with family / friends Watching live sports Checking into a flight Listening to an audio tour while travelling Use my phone to control other devices like my TV Send money via text Use my phone to manage my house (lights,… Sending myself voice reminders Opening a hotel room with a keycard on my phone None of these Here are some activities that you can do on mobile, that you may not have done even a few years ago. Which of these activities are you doing more now, compared to 1-2 years ago?
  6. 6. 6 When facing the proposition of having their smartphone taken away for 2 weeks, 45% say “it would be a major hassle”, 36% say “it would be a minor inconvenience”, and 13% say they “couldn’t live without it”. Only 6% say “I wouldn’t care”. This is largely consistent across all ages and gender. Mobile Shopping Only half of Japanese consumers feel that they can do all the retail activities that they want to on mobile, significantly lower than many other regions. This is consistent across all ages and genders. Yes 53% I can do all the retail activities I want to on mobile
  7. 7. 7 For most shopping activities, smartphones and computers are used in similar proportions, with a few exceptions (tracking a package or making dinner reservations are done most often via phone, while banking and groceries are often done in person, particularly by women). See the chart below for details. Women are generally more likely than men to use a smartphone to conduct retail activities listed below, while men rely on their computer for all except grocery shopping or ordering a taxi. When asked how well marketers today give offers and information for the right product/service, at the right time, only 23% of Japanese consumers say most or lots of the offers they receive are right for them – although this is high among the regions tested. Most (65%) say marketers are doing an ok job, but there is room for improvement. Women are more likely than men to say that marketers target the right offers to them. The most important improvement that should be made to offers to make them more successful in Japan is to make them less intrusive, and be for the products and services that they want. This is consistent across all 12% 19% 11% 12% 8% 16% 13% 18% 24% 14% 14% 5% 6% 5% 9% 28% 10% 7% 16% 13% 35% 55% 13% 13% 33% 10% 30% 20% 43% 39% 28% 28% 43% 4% 24% 29% 16% 50% 43% 41% 40% 34% 33% 36% 30% 30% 22% 14% Tracking a mail package Make a dinner reservation Research a trip Research an electronics purchase Look for clothes to purchase Arrange a return or exchange of an item I purchased Find set-up or usage instructions Order a taxi or ride share Order food delivery Banking Get groceries Which way do you most often do each of these activities? No preference In person Call Computer Smartphone NOTE: Labels <5% are not shown (for readability).
  8. 8. 8 ages and gender. Consumers in Japan are the most likely to say ‘don’t bother me, I will find an offer when I need it’, compared to other countries, although half of GenZ are willing to accept SMS/text offers. Mobile Apps vs. Mobile Websites In general, when interacting with a company, Japanese consumers are indifferent, showing only a slight preference for using a mobile app over a mobile browser. This is fairly consistent across ages and gender. On average, Japanese consumers have < 10 apps from retailers (not including social media and games) installed on their device. Japanese customers are largely indifferent on the use of a mobile browser or mobile app for most activities. 4% 11% 45% 29% 11% Do you prefer to use mobile app or a mobile website when interacting with a company? Browser, strongly Browser, somewhat Indifferent App, somewhat App, strongly 15% browser 40% app
  9. 9. 9 Thinking that an app will provide a better experience, planning to use the app again in the future and apps providing special offers or notifications are the top reasons for consumers to download a company’s mobile app. Voice Commands & Other Innovations Two-thirds of Japanese consumers never or rarely use voice commands to speak to their devices – men are more likely than women (16% vs. 9%) to do so frequently/constantly. While older people simply say they haven’t tried voice commands, younger Japanese feel that typing is just as easy as voice. Japanese consumers are far less likely to use voice commands in public or in the presence of another person. While men think that their use of voice commands will increase somewhat, women think that their usage will remain the same. Only 5% think they will start using voice in the next year (nearly half are unsure). When asked about the adoption of other types of devices, Japanese consumers only predict modest increases in their adoption, (within the next 2 years – see chart below). This is substantially lower than other regions. 16% 18% 12% 17% 24% 16% 20% 19% 17% 27% 28% 48% 50% 58% 54% 49% 58% 54% 58% 62% 53% 54% 36% 33% 30% 28% 27% 26% 26% 23% 21% 21% 18% Banking Look for clothes to purchase Order a taxi or ride share Make a dinner reservation Research a trip Order food delivery Tracking a mail package Arrange a return or exchange of an item Get groceries Research an electronics purchase Find set-up or usage instructions Do you prefer to use a mobile app or a mobile website when doing the following types of activities... Prefer browser Indifferent Prefer app
  10. 10. 10 Men are more likely than women to adopt these new devices, with the exception of connected home devices. 29% 28% 18% 14% 13% 6% 43% Smart speakers/home assistants (e.g., Google Home, Amazon Echo) Home entertainment streaming device (e.g., smart TV, DVR, AppleTV, Roku, Amazon Fire TV Stick) Digital displays (e.g., in-store, restaurants, airports, bank branch) Connected home devices/appliances (e.g., refrigerators, smart thermostats) Wearable device (e.g., Fitbit, Jawbone, Apple Watch) Connected car dashboards None of these Of the devices below, which do you expect to use frequently in the next two years?

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