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ITFDC Annual Provider Training

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Annual Training presentation for ITFDC providers.

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ITFDC Annual Provider Training

  1. 1. Infant Toddler Family Day Care ANNUAL PROVIDER TRAINING © 2 0 1 7 I N F A N T T O D D L E R F A M I L Y D A Y C A R E . A L L R I G H T S R E S E R V E D .
  2. 2. TRAINING TOPICS • Child development including physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, behavior management, and positive guidance techniques • Prevention and control of infectious diseases • Prevention of sudden infant death syndrome and use of safe sleep practices • Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions • Building and physical premises safety • Prevention of shaken baby syndrome and abusive head trauma including procedure to cope with crying babies or distraught children • Signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect and requirements for mandated reporters • Emergency preparedness and response planning for emergencies • Handling and storage of hazardous materials and the appropriate disposal of diapers and other items contaminated by body fluids • Precautions in transporting children • Care and development of children with special needs • Oral health basics • Nutrition • Physical activity ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 2
  3. 3. POSITIVE GUIDANCE TECHNIQUES Mutual Respect: showing respect for child’s needs Understanding the belief behind behavior: Behavior modification will be more effective if you understand where the child is coming from Effective Communication Understanding a Child’s World: based on development, temperament, birth order social/emotional skills. Discipline that teaches Focusing on solutions instead of punishment Encouragement Children do better when they feel better: through affection, respect, encouragement etc. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 3
  4. 4. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT From the start, babies want to explore their world. They are eager to move their eyes, their mouths, and their bodies toward the people and objects that comfort and interest them. They practice skills that let them not only move closer to desired objects, but also move desired objects closer to themselves. As they grow, children's determination to master movement, balance, and fine-motor skills remains intense. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 4
  5. 5. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT A baby begins learning the basics of self-movement and begins to master the skills needed for hand-to-mouth coordination and holding objects. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 5
  6. 6. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT BIRTH TO THREE MONTHS Most infants begin to: •Raise head slightly when lying on stomach •Hold head up for a few seconds, when supported •Hold hand in a fist •Lift head and chest, while lying on stomach •Use sucking, grasping, and rooting (holding tongue to the roof of the mouth) reflexes •Touch, pull, and tug own hands with fascination •Repeat body movements, and enjoy doing so ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 6
  7. 7. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT THREE MONTHS TO SIX MONTHS Babies are quickly becoming stronger and more agile. Most begin to: •Roll over •Push body forward and pull body up by grabbing the edge of a crib •Reach for and touch objects •Reach, grasp, and put objects in mouth •Make discoveries with objects (for example, a rattle makes noise when it is moved) ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 7
  8. 8. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT SIX MONTHS TO NINE MONTHS Child-proofing" becomes important as babies get more mobile. During this time most begin to: •Crawl •Grasp and pull things toward self •Transfer objects between hands ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 8
  9. 9. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT NINE MONTHS TO TWELVE MONTHS By this time, most babies can: •Sit without support •Stand unaided •Walk with aid •Roll a ball •Throw objects •Pick things up with thumb and one finger •Drop and pick up toys ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 9
  10. 10. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT ONE YEAR TO TWO YEARS Walking and self-initiated movement become easier. Most children can: •Walk alone •Walk backwards •Pick up toys from a standing position •Push and pull objects •Seat self in a child's chair •Walk up and down stairs with aid •Move to music •Paint with whole arm movement Balance improves and eye-hand coordination becomes more precise. Most children can: •Put rings on a peg •Turn two or three pages at a time •Scribble •Turn knobs •Grasp and hold a small ball; can use in combination with large motor skills to throw the ball •Shift marker or any drawing or painting tool from hand to hand and draw strokes ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 10
  11. 11. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT TWO YEARS TO THREE YEARS Children become more comfortable with motion, increasing speed, and coordination. Most begin to: •Run forward •Jump in place with both feet together •Stand on one foot, with aid •Walk on tiptoe •Kick ball forward Children are able to manipulate small objects with increased control. Most can: •String large beads •Turn pages one by one •Hold crayon with thumb and fingers instead of fist •Draw a circle •Paint with wrist action, making dots and lines •Roll, pound, squeeze, and pull clay ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 11
  12. 12. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT THREE YEARS TO FOUR YEARS Movement and balance improve. Most children can: •Run around obstacles •Walk on a line •Balance on one foot •Push, pull, and steer toys •Ride a tricycle •Use a slide without help •Throw and catch a ball Children's precision of motion improves significantly. Most are able to: •Build a tall tower of blocks •Drive pegs into holes •Draw crosses and circles •Manipulate clay by making balls, snakes, etc. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 12
  13. 13. PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT FOUR YEARS TO FIVE YEARS Children are now more confident, and most are able to: •Walk backwards •Jump forward many times without falling •Jump on one foot •Walk up and down stairs without assistance, alternating feet •Turn somersaults Children develop skills that will help them as they enter school and begin writing. Most can: •Use safety scissors •Cut on a line continuously •Copy squares and crosses •Print a few capital letters ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 13
  14. 14. SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL/COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT Heart Start from Zero to Three CONFIDENCE - Children feel likely to succeed at their undertakings. CURIOSITY - Children find out about positive things and explore. INTENTIONALITY - Children demonstrate persistence and keep trying and working at a task. SELF-CONTROL - Children have the ability to control one’s own action and have a sense of inner control. RELATEDNESS - Children engage with others and have a sense of belonging. CAPACITY TO COMMUNICATE - The ability to exchange ideas, feelings, and concepts with others, verbally or otherwise. COOPERATIVENESS - Children get along with others and learn to cooperate. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 14
  15. 15. FINE MOTOR DEVELOPMENT Muscle development for writing is a comprehensive process that begins with movements of the whole arm and progresses toward very detailed fine motor control at the fingertips. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 15
  16. 16. Prevention and control of infectious diseases What makes us sick? a. bacteria b. virus c. fungi d. parasite How do we get sick? a. infectious b. communicable diseases How do we prevent infectious disease in child care? a. hand washing b. disinfect/sanitize c. cover your cough ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 16
  17. 17. Prevention of sudden infant death syndrome and use of safe sleep practices No soft bedding Infants under 12 month place on the back Sheets should fit securely on crib mattress Physician’s note for non-back sleepers Sleep only one baby in a crib Check on sleeping babies every 15 minutes Do not allow babies to sleep on adult beds NO SWADDLING Baby Monitors are required Click here to watch the ‘Safe Sleep For Your Baby’ video (https://youtu.be/29sLucYtvpA) ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 17
  18. 18. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions What is an allergic reaction? Your immune system is responsible for defending the body against bacteria and viruses. In some cases, your immune system will defend against substances that typically don’t pose a threat to the human body. These substances are known as allergens, and when your body reacts to them, it causes an allergic reaction. You can inhale, eat, and touch allergens that cause a reaction. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 18
  19. 19. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions What causes an allergic reaction? Doctors don’t know why some people experience allergies. Allergies appear to run in families and can be inherited. Although the reasons why allergies develop aren’t known, there are some substances that commonly cause an allergic reaction. People who have allergies are typically allergic to one or more of the following: pet dander bee stings or bites from other insects certain foods, including nuts or shellfish certain medications, such as penicillin or aspirin certain plants pollen or molds ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 19
  20. 20. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions What are the symptoms of an allergic reaction? The symptoms of an allergic reaction can vary from mild to severe. If you become exposed to an allergen for the first time, your symptoms may be mild. These symptoms may get worse if you repeatedly come into contact with the allergen. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include: hives (itchy red spots on the skin) itching nasal congestion (known as rhinitis) rash scratchy throat watery or itchy eyes ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 20
  21. 21. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions Severe allergic reactions can cause the following symptoms: * abdominal cramping or pain * nausea or vomiting * pain or tightness in the chest * heart palpitations * swelling of the face, eyes, tongue * Diarrhea * difficulty swallowing * weakness * dizziness (vertigo) * wheezing * ear or anxiety * difficulty breathing *flushing of the face * unconsciousness ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 21
  22. 22. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions A severe and sudden allergic reaction can develop within seconds after exposure to an allergen. This type of reaction is known as anaphylaxis and results in life-threatening symptoms, including swelling of the airway, inability to breathe, and a sudden and severe drop in blood pressure. If you experience this type of allergic reaction, seek immediate emergency help. Without treatment, this condition can result in death within 15 minutes. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 22
  23. 23. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions If you or someone you know experiences a severe allergic reaction, you should seek emergency medical attention. Check to see if the person is breathing, call 911, and provide CPR if needed. People with known allergies often have emergency medications with them such as an epinephrine auto-injector (EpiPen). Epinephrine is a “rescue drug” because it opens the airways and raises blood pressure. The person may need your help to administer the medication. If the person is unconscious, you should:  Lay the person flat on their back.  Elevate the person’s legs.  Cover the person with a blanket.  This will help prevent shock ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 23
  24. 24. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions How can you prevent an allergic reaction? Once you identify your allergy, you can:  Avoid exposure to the allergen.  Seek medical care if you are exposed to the allergen.  Carry medications to treat anaphylaxis. You may not be able to avoid an allergic reaction completely, but these steps can help you to prevent future allergic reactions. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 24
  25. 25. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions Preventing exposure to the specific food and other substances to which the child is allergic: ◦ Be aware of all ingredients in food before serving. ◦ Watch children carefully when serving foods that may cause a reaction. There are eight foods that most commonly trigger a reaction: ◦ Cow’s milk ◦ Eggs ◦ Peanuts ◦ Tree nuts ◦ Fish ◦ Shellfish ◦ Soy ◦ Wheat ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 25
  26. 26. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions What are some nonfood items that may trigger a reaction? Soaps Dried Pasta Crayons (may contain soy) Fingerpaint (may contain milk or egg whites) Modeling Clay (may contain wheat) ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 26
  27. 27. Prevention of and response to emergencies due to food and other allergic reactions Preventing cross contamination: Label Foods in Your Home as "Safe" or "Not Safe“ Avoid Pantry Mix-Ups Avoid Sippy Cup Mix-Ups Avoid Contaminating Your Food Supply Teach everyone to wash their hands before touching safe foods. Do not allergen covered utensils to touch your “safe” food. Teach everyone to clean all surfaces including countertops after preparing food. Avoid Getting Allergenic Residue All Over the House. Take steps to avoid cross-contact with allergens during the cooking or serving process. Take Care to Wash Dishes. Keep guests informed. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 27
  28. 28. BUILDING AND PHYSICAL PREMISES SAFETY The following are unsafe if accessible to children: a. poisonous plants b. tripping hazards c. unstable heavy furniture d. splintered, cracked or otherwise deteriorating wood e. chipped or peeling paint f. visible cracks, bending/warping, rusted/broken equipment g. head entrapment hazards h. protruding nails ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 28
  29. 29. BUILDING AND PHYSICAL PREMISES SAFETY Hanging items including window blind or curtain cords, appliance cords, and ropes shall be out of reach of children Children shall be protected from materials that could be swallowed or present a choking hazard. Hood or neck drawstrings shall be removed from a child’s clothing Latex gloves, balloons, and empty plastic bags are inaccessible to children Children have no access to swimming pools, hot tubs, spas, or whirlpools. Bathtubs, buckets, and other containers of liquid are not accessible to children Children have no access to trampolines Poisonous materials are inaccessible to children Lawnmowers, power tools, exercise equipment, sewing machines and irons are not in use around children. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 29
  30. 30. BUILDING AND PHYSICAL PREMISES SAFETY Small electrical appliances are unplugged when not in use Electrical outlets are covered No electrical device is accessible to children that could be in contact with a water source Electrical cords and electrical appliances with cords that are frayed and have exposed wires shall not be used. Radiators, oil and wood burning stoves, floor furnaces fireplaces, portable electric heaters and similar heating devices in areas accessible to children have barriers and are at least three feet away from combustible materials. Flammable materials are not accessible to children. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 30
  31. 31. Prevention of shaken baby syndrome and abusive head trauma Shaken Baby Syndrome/Abusive Head Trauma (SBS) is the name given to physical child abuse that can occur when a young child is severely or violently shaken. The shaking may only last a few seconds, but the effects last a lifetime. Young children, especially babies, have very weak neck muscles and do not yet have full control of their head movements. When they are shaken, the head whips back and forth slamming their fragile brain tissue against the hard skull, causing bruising, bleeding and swelling inside the brain. Shaking combined with throwing, dropping or slamming the baby can be deadly. Click here to watch the ‘Portrait of Promise: Preventing Shaken Baby Syndrome’ video. (https://youtu.be/m9m5KwvX0pQ) ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 31
  32. 32. SHAKEN BABY SYNDROME (SBS) •SBS is a leading cause of child abuse deaths in the United States. •Babies (newborn to 4 months) are at greatest risk of injury from shaking. •Inconsolable crying is a primary trigger for shaking a baby. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 32
  33. 33. WHAT TRIGGERS SHAKING? Inconsolable crying is the number one reason given for shaking a baby. The perpetrators normally have little or no knowledge on how to safely care for a crying infant or young child. The caregiver becomes frustrated and loses control and violently shakes the child to get him/her to stop crying. They just want the baby to stop crying! Why are babies vulnerable to shaking?  Babies normally cry for two to three hours a day.  Some cry for longer periods for unknown reasons.  Babies communicate by crying. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 33
  34. 34. WHAT ARE THE LONG TERM EFFECTS OF SBS? Although there are sometimes no outward physical signs of trauma, there may be bruising, bleeding or swelling.  Severe brain damage  Learning disabilities  Blindness  Paralysis  Hearing loss  Speech problems  Death Other symptoms include: change in behavior, irritability, lethargy or loss of consciousness, pale or bluish skin, vomiting, and convulsions. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 34
  35. 35. HOW CAN SBS BE PREVENTED? •Research shows that shaking most often results from crying or other factors that may trigger the person caring for the baby to become frustrated or angry. •The fact is that crying—including long bouts of inconsolable crying—is normal developmental behavior in infants. The problem is not the crying; however, it’s how caregivers respond to it. Picking up a baby and shaking, throwing, hitting, or hurting him/her is never an appropriate response. •Everyone, from caregivers to bystanders, can do something to prevent SBS. Giving parents and caregivers tools to know how they can cope if they find themselves becoming frustrated are important components of any SBS prevention initiative. •You can play a key role in reinforcing prevention through helping people understand the dangers of violently shaking a baby, the risk factors and the triggers for it, and ways to lessen the load on stressed out parents and caregivers. All of which may help to reduce the number of children impacted by SBS. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 35
  36. 36. WHAT SHOULD YOU DO IF A BABY HAS BEEN SHAKEN? If you or someone else shakes a baby, the most important step is to get medical care right away. Immediately take the child to the pediatrician or emergency room. Don’t let embarrassment, guilt or fear get in the way of a child’s health or life. If a baby’s brain is damaged or bleeding inside from severe shaking, it will only get worse without treatment. Getting medical care right away may save the child’s life and prevent serious health problems from developing. Be sure to tell the pediatrician, or other doctor, if you know or suspect that a child was shaken. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 36
  37. 37. Signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect Certain general symptoms that may suggest that a child is experiencing some type of abuse or neglect include: • Slower-than-normal development. • Failure to thrive. This is a term that means the child isn't gaining weight or height the way he or she should. • Unusual interaction with a parent. The parent may not be interested in the child. Or the child may be constantly trying not to upset the parent. The child may actually be afraid of the parent. • Mental health problems, such as having low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, or thoughts of suicide. • Suddenly getting lower grades in school. • Behaving in a way that isn't appropriate or that causes problems. In a young child, this could mean being unusually fussy, being afraid, or not being interested in activities. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 37
  38. 38. Requirements for mandated reporters of child abuse and neglect Virginia law requires that mandated reporters report all cases of suspected child abuse or neglect to child protective services regardless of the abuser/neglector’s relationship to the child. Family child care providers are mandated reporters of child abuse or neglect. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 38
  39. 39. Emergency preparedness and response planning for emergencies •Resulting from a natural disaster, or a man-caused event such as violence at a family day home and the home’s specific emergency preparedness plan as required. Training on the home’s emergency prep plan shall be completed annually and each time the plan is updated. •Click here to watch the Fire’s Fury video (https://youtu.be/008qKNFlUOQ) ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 39
  40. 40. Handling and storage of hazardous materials Handwashing: ◦ Upon arrival for the day ◦ Before and after ◦ Eating, handling food, or feeding a child ◦ Giving medication ◦ Playing in water that is used by more than one person ◦ After ◦ Diapering ◦ Using the toilet or helping a child use a toilet ◦ Handling bodily fluid ◦ Handling uncooked food ◦ Playing in sandboxes ◦ Cleaning or handling the garbage ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 40
  41. 41. Prevention of Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids •Early care and education programs should adopt the use of Standard Precautions, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to handle potential exposure to blood and other potentially infectious fluids. Caregivers and teachers are required to be educated regarding Standard Routine Cleaning, Sanitizing, and Disinfecting •Programs should follow a routine schedule of cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting. Cleaning, sanitizing, and disinfecting products should not be used in close proximity to children, and adequate ventilation should be maintained during use. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 41
  42. 42. The Appropriate Disposal of Diapers and Other Items Contaminated by Body Fluid Proper disposal of materials that are soaked in or caked with blood requires double bagging in plastic bags that are securely tied. Send these items home with the child, or if you wash them, wash them separately from other items. Items used for procedures on children with special needs (such as lancets for finger sticks, or syringes for injections given by parents or children) may require a special container to dispose of safely. Parents can provide what is called a “sharps container” which safely stores the lancets or needles until the parent can take them home. The following link takes you to additional information: http://www.cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/3.2.3.4 ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 42
  43. 43. Ten Steps for Changing a Diaper in Child Care Important reminder: NEVER leave an infant unattended on a changing table. 1. Prepare for the diaper change. Collect supplies needed (clean diaper, wipes, plastic bags, latex gloves, clean clothes) and place them near –- but not on –- the diapering table. Put on disposable latex gloves before picking up the child. Place the child on the diapering table, always keep a hand on her. 2. Remove clothing and unfasten the diaper. Place soiled clothing in a plastic bag to send home. Unfasten the diaper, but leave the soiled diaper under the child. 3. Clean the diaper area. Clean the child thoroughly with disposable wipes. Wipe front to back. Be sure to clean all creases and cracks in the child's skin. Roll up the soiled diaper with used wipes inside and dispose in a lined, covered trash can. 4. Remove gloves Remove gloves by grabbing one glove from the middle and pulling it off, then pulling the cuff of the other glove by sliding your hand inside the cuff and pulling it down toward your fingertips. Turn the second glove inside out over the first glove as you take it off. Avoid touching the glove surface with your bare hands. Dispose of gloves. 5. Wipe your hands and the child’s hands. Use separate wipes for yourself and the child. Dispose of wipes. 6. Put on the clean diaper. Fasten the diaper securely, and dress the child. 7. Wash the child’s hands with soap and warm running water. 8. Return the child to the play area without touching anything else. Do not hand the child a toy or touch any equipment. 9. Clean and disinfect the diaper table. Clean the surface with a spray bottle of soap and water, rinse, and wipe with a paper towel. Disinfect the diapering area with a bleach and water solution. Allow the solution to stay on the surface at least two minutes, then wipe dry with a paper towel or allow the surface to air dry. 10. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm, running water. Record the child’s diaper change on the daily record sheet to give to parents. If you are changing several children's diapers in a row, be sure to wash your hands and disinfect the diaper table after each diaper change. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 43
  44. 44. Hazardous materials •Integrated Pest Management Programs should adopt an integrated pest management program to ensure long-term, environmentally sound pest suppression through practices including pest exclusion, sanitation and clutter control, and elimination of conditions that are conducive to pest infestations. •Use and Storage of Toxic Substances All toxic substances should be inaccessible to children and should not be used when children are present. Toxic substances should be used as recommended by the manufacturer and stored in the original labeled containers. The telephone number for the poison control center should be posted and readily accessible in emergency situations. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 44
  45. 45. Links to Information on Hazardous Materials The following links to Caring for Our Children National Health and Safety Performance Standards Guidelines for Early Care and Education Programs (CFOC3) pertain to handling and storing hazardous materials and the appropriate disposal of biological contaminants. The links go to the full text of the standard, with a rationale supported by research. Situations that Require Hand Hygiene http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/3.2.2.1 Prevention of Exposure to Blood and Body Fluids http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/3.2.3.4 Routine Cleaning, Sanitizing, and Disinfecting http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/3.3.0.1 Environmental Audit of Site Location http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.1.1.5 ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 45
  46. 46. Links to Information on Hazardous Materials Fresh Air http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.1.1 Integrated Pest Management http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.8.1 Use and Storage of Toxic Substances http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.1 Use of a Poison Center http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.2 ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 46
  47. 47. Links to Information on Hazardous Materials Informing Staff Regarding Presence of Toxic Substances http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.3 Radon Concentrations http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.4 Carbon Monoxide Detectors http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.5 Preventing Exposure to Asbestos or Other Friable Materials http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.6 Proper Use of Art and Craft Materials http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.7 ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 47
  48. 48. Links to Information on Hazardous Materials Use of Play Dough and Other Manipulative Art or Sensory Materials http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.8 Plastic Containers and Toys http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.9 Prohibition of Poisonous Plants http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.10 Chemicals Used to Control Odors http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.11 Treatment of CCA [Chromated Copper Arsenate] Pressure-Treated Wood http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.12 ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 48
  49. 49. Links to Information on Hazardous Materials Testing for Lead http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.13 Shoes in Infant Play Areas http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.14 Construction and Remodeling During Hours of Operation http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/5.2.9.15 Play Equipment Requirements http://cfoc.nrckids.org/StandardView/6.2.1.1 ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 49
  50. 50. Hazardous Materials Carbon Monoxide Detectors Programs should meet state or local laws regarding carbon monoxide detectors, including circumstances when detectors are necessary. Detectors should be tested monthly, and testing should be documented. Batteries should be changed at least yearly. Detectors should be replaced according to the manufacturer’s instructions. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 50
  51. 51. Precautions in transporting children •Rear-facing seats from birth to at least 2 yrs. •Forward-facing toddler seats with a harness from age 2 to at least age 4 & 40 pounds. •Use booster seats from age four to age eight – unless the child is 4 ft. 9 inches or taller. •Use safety belts in the back seat at age eight or older or taller than 4 ft. 9 inches •Visit www.safetyseatva.org •Not covered by the ITFDC Liability Insurance ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 51
  52. 52. CAR SEAT SAFETY •The restraint used must be right for the size and age of the child. •The child must be snugly and correctly harnessed into the restraint. •The restraint must be tightly and correctly installed in the vehicle in the back seat. •A small study found leaving sleeping babies alone in car seats could lead to blocked airways. •Car seats should only be used for transportation purposes. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 52
  53. 53. Care and development of children with special needs Child care providers often work with children who have identified special needs. Working with children who have special needs can be very rewarding if you understand the child and his special need and make appropriate accommodations to support his learning and development. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 53
  54. 54. Care and development of children with special needs Seeing Children First It's important to remember that children with special needs are children first. They have the same needs as all children -- a place where they feel physically comfortable, loved and secure; opportunities to play and learn; people who care about them; and activities that allow them to be successful. Children with special needs often are not so different from typically-developing children. They may need more time to learn and practice certain skills. They may need more praise and encouragement to gain the skills typical for their age group. They may need specific adaptations to help them succeed at certain activities. In many, many ways these children have lots in common with other children. Many child care professionals emphasize this point by using "children first" language, referring to "a child with special needs" rather than "a special needs child." ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 54
  55. 55. Care and development of children with special needs • Recognizing Each Child's Uniqueness When working with children who have special needs, child care providers need to realize that each child and each disability is unique. A child with visual impairments has different needs than a child with behavioral challenges. A 2- year-old with a physical disability has different abilities and challenges than a 4-year-old with the same type of disability. Some children have more than one type of disability. The severity of the challenges that each disability presents is also different for each child. In some cases, child care providers need to make very few changes or modifications to the child care program for the child with a special need to participate fully. In other situations, modifications to the child care program may require more time, effort and expense. • Benefits of Including Children with Special Needs in Child Care Everyone benefits when child care programs include children with special needs. Children with disabilities benefit from being with other children and from receiving consistent care from a caring adult. Typically developing children benefit from having a classmate with a special need because they learn respect for a child whose abilities are different from theirs as well as how to respond appropriately and offer help to the child. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 55
  56. 56. Care and development of children with special needs The following articles provide specific information and strategies that child care providers can use to include a child with special needs in the child care program. • What Is Inclusive Child Care? • Adapting the Child Care Environment for Children with Special Needs • Building Portfolios with Children with Special Needs • Creative Art Activities for Children with Special Needs • Peer Support for Children with Special Needs • Talking with and about Children with Special Needs • Tips for Child Care Providers to Communicate Concerns about Children's Development with Parents • Ways Child Care Providers Can Prepare for Enrollment of a Child with Special Needs • Ways Child Care Providers Can Support Siblings of Children with Special Needs ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 56
  57. 57. Care and development of children with special needs The following articles will help child care providers better understand rules related to children who have special needs. • What Do Child Care Providers Need to Know about IEPs and IFSPs? • What Child Care Providers Need to Know about Disability Laws The following sections focus on the characteristics of specific disabilities, and include strategies child care providers can use to adapt the program to better include children with each type of special need. • Hearing Disabilities • Learning Disabilities • Physical Disabilities • Social and Emotional Disabilities • Special Dietary Needs • Visual Disabilities ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 57
  58. 58. Oral health basics • Starting children off with good dental care can help protect their teeth for decades to come. A baby’s 20 primary teeth are present in the jaws at birth. Teeth that begin coming through the gums around 6 months help set the stage for future smiles by keeping space in the jaw for adult teeth. • The ADA recommends parents take children to a dentist no later than their first birthday. Here's what you can do at home to start healthy habits: • Begin cleaning baby’s mouth during the first few days after birth by wiping the gums with a clean, moist gauze pad or washcloth. As soon as teeth appear, decay can occur. A baby’s front four teeth usually push through the gums at about 6 months of age, although some children don’t have their first tooth until 12 or 14 months. • Until you’re comfortable that children can brush on their own, brush your children's teeth twice a day with a child- size toothbrush and a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. When children have two teeth that touch, you should begin flossing their teeth daily. • For children younger than 3 years, caregivers should begin brushing children’s teeth as soon as they begin to come into the mouth by using fluoride toothpaste in an amount no more than a smear or the size of a grain of rice. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing to ensure that they use of the appropriate amount of toothpaste. • For children 3 to 6 years of age, use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Brush teeth thoroughly twice per day (morning and night) or as directed by a dentist or physician. Supervise children’s brushing and remind them not to swallow the toothpaste. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 58
  59. 59. WHAT IS NUTRITION? WHAT IS OBESITY? Nutrition is the process of taking in food and obtaining energy and vital substances from it. Obesity is one of the most common public health problems in our society today. Children are increasingly affected by lack of activity and unhealthy food choices. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 59
  60. 60. What are the USDA required meal components? •Meat or Meat Alternative •Whole Grains and Breads •Vegetables and Fruit •Milk ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 60
  61. 61. Physical activity •Physical activity is vital for a child’s development and lays the foundation for a healthy and active life. Early childhood services are ideally placed to foster the development of good physical activity habits early in life and to encourage families to engage in regular physical activity. •Early childhood services should offer a wide choice of play- based, physically active experiences that link to children’s interests and abilities. Physical activity in child care needs to be both structured (i.e. intentionally taught) physical activity and unstructured, spontaneous activity. In addition, as active role models, educators can encourage children to participate in physical activity. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 61
  62. 62. ITFDC PROVIDER ANNUAL TRAINING © 2017 ITFDC 62 Infant Toddler Family Day Care 11166 Fairfax Blvd., Suite 206 Fairfax, VA 22030 703-352-3449 www.itfdc.com Please complete the quiz at: http://bit.ly/2nLC8TK

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