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Webinar Topic: Organization of Aboriginal Education
Resources in the Library Learning Commons
By Maria McAllister
SD #44 N...
This presentation serves
to demonstrate how I
reorganized the aboriginal
resources in my
elementary school library
learnin...
Aboriginal Education in 2015
Introduction:
Students and educators alike want to access
resources quickly and easily.
Situa...
Step 1
• Identify all aboriginal resources from more
than six Home Locations:
• Ex. Easy, Fiction, Non-fiction (398.2, 970...
Database search of collection to identify
Home Locations:
Image of on line search at my desk
with resources as background.
Key Search Words
• Aboriginal
• Indigenous
• First Nations
• Native
• First Peoples
• Haida
• Coast Salish
• Sto Lo
• Chin...
Current limited visibility of resources
which are spread out through several sections of the library including:
Non-Fictio...
Step 3:
Visually organize collection to get an overview
Step 4:
How many themes you will divide collection into?
(Consider: How many tubs does your collection need to
be effectiv...
Step 5: Label your tubs and place on
shelves
Step 6 – Raise Awareness of the
Improved Collection and Easy Access
Next Step:
Hold lunch hour bannock and tea Open House
...
Select Titles
• CANOE CROSSINGS
• UNDERSTANDING THE CRAFT
• THAT HELPED SHAPE BRITISH
• COLUMBIA
• Sanford Osler
• This is...
Highly Recommended ages 9-12
• Fatty Legs Share this with a friend
• A True Story
•
by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret ...
Recommended Reads Ages 6-9
Recommended Sequel Ages 9-12
• Stranger at Home, A Share this with a friend
• A True Story
•
by Christy Jordan-Fenton and ...
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Aboriginal education

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Webinar Topic: Organization of Aboriginal Education Resources in the Library Learning Commons
By Maria McAllister
SD #44 North Vancouver
May 27, 2015

Published in: Education
  • Thank you Maria. We are sharing your slides and transcript with a school that is just starting to reorganize their aboriginal resouces into themes.
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Aboriginal education

  1. 1. Webinar Topic: Organization of Aboriginal Education Resources in the Library Learning Commons By Maria McAllister SD #44 North Vancouver May 27, 2015
  2. 2. This presentation serves to demonstrate how I reorganized the aboriginal resources in my elementary school library learning commons to better meet needs of library users (students, teachers and administrators, counselors, learning assistance specialists). Aboriginal Resources in the School Library
  3. 3. Aboriginal Education in 2015 Introduction: Students and educators alike want to access resources quickly and easily. Situation: materials were not circulating as often as I would have liked it Remedy: resources needed to be easier to access; hence, to have a higher profile. Action Plan: Hands-on work required.
  4. 4. Step 1 • Identify all aboriginal resources from more than six Home Locations: • Ex. Easy, Fiction, Non-fiction (398.2, 970, 971), Teaching Resource section, Graphic Novels 741.5, Holidays
  5. 5. Database search of collection to identify Home Locations: Image of on line search at my desk with resources as background.
  6. 6. Key Search Words • Aboriginal • Indigenous • First Nations • Native • First Peoples • Haida • Coast Salish • Sto Lo • Chinook • Nisga’a • Inuit
  7. 7. Current limited visibility of resources which are spread out through several sections of the library including: Non-Fiction Section 398.2 Myths and legends Non-fiction section 970, 971 Canadian History • Multiple locations increase time to locate what is needed • Aboriginal books labeled with Native American theme sticker; helpful for easy retrieval
  8. 8. Step 3: Visually organize collection to get an overview
  9. 9. Step 4: How many themes you will divide collection into? (Consider: How many tubs does your collection need to be effectively represented and used? Review your resources to determine which words best describe your collection for all users. • Myths and Legends? Civilization? • History? Biography? Culture? Art? Architecture? • Survival? Traditions? Hunting? Fishing?
  10. 10. Step 5: Label your tubs and place on shelves
  11. 11. Step 6 – Raise Awareness of the Improved Collection and Easy Access Next Step: Hold lunch hour bannock and tea Open House for staff to view new library resources organization Invite our NVSD aboriginal education resource person as special guest and / or along local aboriginal drummer for the occasion (I also revamped our aboriginal collection with $300 in new book purchases). Vendors: Odin Books, Kidsbooks Vancouver, BC
  12. 12. Select Titles • CANOE CROSSINGS • UNDERSTANDING THE CRAFT • THAT HELPED SHAPE BRITISH • COLUMBIA • Sanford Osler • This is a fascinating historical • exploration of the innovative • development and impact of the • canoe, Canada’s cultural symbol • of healing and community. • Osler eloquently explores how • the canoe helped define Canada • as a country and shaped our • people. Radiocarbon dating • revealed Natives inhabited • Haida Gwaii 12,600years ago; • the discovery of the oldest canoe • (4000 years) in Ireland links the • evolution of this pivotal survival tool to coastal Natives. Osler skillfully reveals the canoe’s influence on creating sustainable • native economies and Native/ European partnerships. • The canoe’s geographical development • from Eastern birchbark, • Northern ‘skin boats’ (kayaks, • uniaks), Asian influenced • dragon boats and outriggers, to • coastal war canoes and Salish • racing boats, influenced the • surge of innovative canoes created in BC. K-9 Program • CLOUDWALKER • Roy Henry Vickers & • Robert Budd • Roy Henry Vickers, illus. • Cloudwalker tells the story of • the creation of the Skeena River • by a young and strong warrior, • Astace (Cloudwalker), who is • taken up to the clouds by a flock • of swans. As he wanders the • clouds, Cloudwalker spills water • from his cedar box, thus creating • the river. Seventeen breathtaking • new prints by celebrated • First Nations artist, Roy Henry • Vickers, illustrate this legend, • greatly adding to the impact of • the story. • Budd is the host of Voices • of BC on the CBC. Vickers • has published five books. • Cloudwalker is the second • collaboration in a series of • Northwest Coast legends. Budd • and Vickers’ first book, Raven • Brings the Light, was shortlisted • for the BC Book Prizes, Bill • Duthie Booksellers' Choice • Award and the First Nation • Communities Read Program. • K-12 Program
  13. 13. Highly Recommended ages 9-12 • Fatty Legs Share this with a friend • A True Story • by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton illustrated by Liz Amini-Holmes • Ten Best Children’s Books of the Year, The Globe and Mail USBBY Outstanding International Books Honor List PubWest Book Design Awards, Bronze Nautilus Award, Silver Skipping Stones Honor Book Information Book Award, Honor Book Best Books for Kids & Teens, starred selection, Canadian Children’s Book Centre First Nation Communities Read Selection Sheila A. Egoff Children’s Literature Prize finalist Book of the Year Award finalist, ForeWord Reviews Cybils, Blogger Literary Award nomination Saskatchewan Young Readers’ Choice Award nomination Hackmatack Award nomination Children’s Literature Roundtables of Canada Information Book Award nomination Golden Oak Award nomination, Ontario Library Association Rocky Mountain Book Award nomination Young Readers Choice Award nomination, Pacific Northwest Library Association • Eight-year-old Margaret Pokiak has set her sights on learning to read, even though it means leaving her village in the high Arctic. Faced with unceasing pressure, her father finally agrees to let her make the five-day journey to attend school, but he warns Margaret of the terrors of residential schools. • At school Margaret soon encounters the Raven, a black-cloaked nun with a hooked nose and bony fingers that resemble claws. She immediately dislikes the strong-willed young Margaret. Intending to humiliate her, the heartless Raven gives gray stockings to all the girls — all except Margaret, who gets red ones. In an instant Margaret is the laughingstock of the entire school. • In the face of such cruelty, Margaret refuses to be intimidated and bravely gets rid of the stockings. Although a sympathetic nun stands up for Margaret, in the end it is this brave young girl who gives the Raven a lesson in the power of human dignity. • Complemented by archival photos from Margaret Pokiak-Fenton’s collection and striking artworks from Liz Amini-Holmes, this inspiring first-person account of a plucky girl’s determination to confront her tormentor will linger with young readers.
  14. 14. Recommended Reads Ages 6-9
  15. 15. Recommended Sequel Ages 9-12 • Stranger at Home, A Share this with a friend • A True Story • by Christy Jordan-Fenton and Margaret Pokiak-Fenton illustrated by Liz Amini-Holmes • USBBY Outstanding International Books Award Best Bets List, Ontario Library Association White Ravens Collection, International Youth Library, Munich Independent Publishers Book Award Skipping Stones Honors List Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre Nonfiction Honor List, VOYA Book of the Year Award finalist, Foreword Reviews Next Generation Indie Book Award finalist First Nation Communities Reads Selection finalist Golden Oak Award nomination • Traveling to be reunited with her family in the arctic, 10- year-old Margaret Pokiak can hardly contain her excitement. It’s been two years since her parents delivered her to the school run by the dark-cloaked nuns and brothers. • Coming ashore, Margaret spots her family, but her mother barely recognizes her, screaming, “Not my girl.” Margaret realizes she is now marked as an outsider. • And Margaret is an outsider: she has forgotten the language and stories of her people, and she can’t even stomach the food her mother prepares. • However, Margaret gradually relearns her language and her family’s way of living. Along the way, she discovers how important it is to remain true to the ways of her people—and to herself. • Highlighted by archival photos and striking artwork, this first-person account of a young girl’s struggle to find her place will inspire young readers to ask what it means to belong.

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