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Lectures Moddemeyer - Resilient Design Performance Standard

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Sustainable Water - Energy - Centric Communities school
May 9 - 13, 2016 – Lake Como School of Advanced Studies

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Lectures Moddemeyer - Resilient Design Performance Standard

  1. 1. RESILIENT DESIGN PERFORMANCE STANDARD LAKE COMO COURSE TrainingSession: How to Implement the Standard 5/10/2016
  2. 2. Fires and floods, 2012-2013
  3. 3. Impacted communities need federal funds to help pay for recovery “…grantees must identify and implement resilience performance standards that can be applied to each infrastructure project.” - June 3, 2014 Federal Register
  4. 4. Solution? Create a locally tailored Resilient Design Performance Standard
  5. 5. Key desired outcomes -11/20/2015 • Match the unique geography • Align with the existing and future projects • Make the CDBG-DR projects eligible for HUD funding • Make sure that we aren’t putting together another bureaucratic layer that slows things down • Make sure that it is practical and applicable, must have utility, more than checking the box • Meaningful: be able to explain that what is being done is meaningful to counteract frustrations • Make sure the standards are measurable, concise and clear, focused and targeted • No need to reinvent the wheel • Cutting-edge • Great
  6. 6. What is Resilience in Colorado? “The ability of communities to rebound, positively adapt to, or thrive amidst changing conditions or challenges – including disasters and climate change – and maintain quality of life, healthy growth, durable systems and conservation of resources for present and future generations.” -Colorado Resiliency Working Group
  7. 7. Three-steps to implement the Standard Resilience Indicators Performance Goals Business Case
  8. 8. How did we create the time-to- recovery goals? Applied NIST Community Resilience Planning Guide for Buildings and Infrastructure Systems • Workshops in November, December, January • “How long is it OK for something to be broken in the next 100-year flood?” • Local community assigns required level of functionality after a disaster and recovery time • Includes consideration of social and economic needs, dependencies • Organizes facility types into categories
  9. 9. Groups and Clusters Buildings Transportati on Energy Systems Communic ations Systems Water/ Wastewater Systems Watersheds & Natural Systems • Emergency facilities • Housing • Commercial facilities • Community buildings essential to recovery • Roads • Non- motorized infrastructure • Bridges • Public transit • Airports and heliports • Electricity lines • Gas lines • Substations • Power generation facilities • Emergency / redundant power • Cell towers • Data centers/ hubs • Emergency communica tion systems including informal systems (e.g., HAM) • Reservoirs • Conveyance systems • Pumping stations • Wastewater plants • Creek Corridors • Parks and PublicOpen Space • Levies • Trails • Habitat How did we create the time-to- recovery goals?
  10. 10. • Minimal (30%) • Functional (60%) • Operational (90%) How did we create the time-to- recovery goals?
  11. 11. • Minimal (30%): Minimum performance required to support immediate relief. Meeting this goal may be accomplished through rapid repairs with either temporary, permanent, or programmatic work- arounds. • Functional (60%): Minimum performance required to support routine or non-exceptional operations during the transitional phase between relief and recovery. Meeting this goal may be accomplished through rapid repairs with either temporary, permanent, or programmatic fixes. • Operational (90%): Performance required to meet normal and peak demand operations. How did we create the time-to- recovery goals?
  12. 12. How did we create the time-to- recovery goals? c Design Hazard Performance Phase 1 Short-Term Phase 2 Intermediate Phase 3 Long-Term Days Weeks Months 0 1 1-7 1-4 4-8 8-12 4 4-24 24+ Ingress (goods, services, disaster relief) Freeways and Expressways Minimal Functional Operational Other Principal Arterial Highways Minimal Functional Operational Minor Arterial Highways Minimal Functional Operational Local Roads Minimal Functional Operational Bikeways Minimal Functional Operational Transit, Bus, Light Rail, Transit Lanes Minimal Functional Operational A Regional Airport Minimal Functional Operational Egress (emergency egress, evacuation) Freeways and Expressways Minimal Functional Operational Other Principal Arterial Highways Minimal Functional Operational Minor Arterial Highways Minimal Functional Operational Local Roads Minimal Functional Operational Bikeways Minimal Functional Operational Transit, Bus, Light Rail, Transit Lanes Minimal Functional Operational A Regional Airport Minimal Functional Operational Community Resilience Critical Facilities Emergency Operational Centers Functional Operational Police and Fire Stations Functional Operational Hospitals Minimal Functional Operational Assisted Living Facilities Minimal Functional Operational Detention Centers Operational Emergency Housing Temporary Emergency Shelters Operational Single and Multi-family Housing (Shelter in place) Operational Neighborhood Critical Retail Minimal Functional Operational Religious and Spiritual Centers Community Centers Minimal Functional Operational Single and Multi-family Housing (Full- Function) Minimal Functional Operational Schools Operational Hotels and Motels Operational Community Recovery Businesses - Manufacturing Minimal Functional Operational Businesses - Retail Minimal Functional Operational Businesses - Service Professions Minimal Functional Operational Conference and Event Venues Minimal Functional Operational Non-emergency City Services
  13. 13. Step 1. Determine time-to- recovery goals, hazard level, project priority
  14. 14. Step 2. Apply the Resilient Design Performance Standard
  15. 15. Step 2. Apply the Resilient Design Performance Standard 2 1 1 0
  16. 16. Score 19 or more 8.1. Identify project design solutions that serve to meet other community goals such as jobs, equity, recreation and aesthetics 2 A project that can provide multiple benefits to community will be more highly ranked than one that only serves a single purpose. Reviewing existing plans can identify opportunities for mutual support. Cost effectiveness can increase if multiple objectives can create synergies. 9.1. Account for value of benefit to future generations when identifying preferred alternatives. 2 To better reflect the multi-generational investments OMB Circular A-4 recommends applying a 1% discount rate in the economic analysis for future generations, 3% for a consumption perspective, and 7% discount rates to model an investment perspective. Document findings in the Business Case. Total Possible Points 28 0 Project TOTAL In meeting or exceeding the resilience performance standard of 22 points the project is contributing towards resilience by meeting the Time-to-Recovery goal 9. Long Term Lasting Impact. Create long term gains to the community with solutions that are replicable and sustainable, creating benefits for present and future generations. 8. Harmonize with existing activity. Expand, enhance, or leverage work being done to build on existing efforts. Assure outcomes that are environmentally friendly, sustainable, and complementary to the natural setting 2 0 24 19
  17. 17. Integrated with the Colorado Resiliency Framework • Vision and definition of resilience • Guiding principles • Resiliency Prioritization Criteria (9 factors) • Cross-sector strategies for implementation How did we create the Resilient Design Performance Standard?
  18. 18. Use integrated resilient design to build back better across the triple bottom line How did we create the Resilient Design Performance Standard?
  19. 19. Build back better across the triple bottom line • Implements the time-to-recovery goals • Builds on priorities listed in the Colorado Resiliency Framework • Includes resilience indicators for each priority • Some indicators required, others optional • Crosswalks with work BOCO Strong is doing on characterizing resiliency at the community level. What are the indicators?
  20. 20. Priority 1. Co-Benefits Provide solutions that address problems across multiple sectors creating maximum benefit. 1.1.Apply a business case format that includes consideration of alternatives and robust analysis of those alternatives across the triple bottom line of economics, community, and the environment. Required 1.2. Use multi-disciplinary design team to develop and consider a range of integrated solutions that provide enhanced value across the triple bottom line.Optional
  21. 21. Priority 2. High Risk and Vulnerability Ensure that strategies directly address the reduction of risk to human well-being, physical infrastructure, and natural systems. Indicator 2.1. Satisfy the time-to-recovery performance goal. Required Indicator 2.2. Identify gaps and find solutions for moving forward. Required Indicator 2.3. Consider project alternatives that augment capacity and increase buffers from high risk locations such as floodplains, landslide and urban wildfire interface when applicable. Required
  22. 22. Priority 3. Economic Benefit Cost Make good financial investments that have the potential for economic benefit to the investor and the broader community both through direct and indirect returns. Indicator 3.1. Evaluate benefit of programmatic solutions when developing alternatives for capital projects. Required Indicator 3.2. Consider if project can increase nearby land and property values and encourage local business opportunities. Optional Indicator 3.3. Consider if project can create opportunities for local jobs and training Optional
  23. 23. Priority 4. Social Equity Provide solutions that includes consideration of populations that are often most fragile and vulnerable to sudden impacts due to their continual state of stress. Indicator 4.1. Avoid disproportionate negative impacts to vulnerable populations. Required Indicator 4.2. Encourage diversity of actors and processes at each scale. Optional Indicator 4.3. Maintain and enhance social connectedness up, down, and between community groups, civic groups, religious and cultural communities, as well as opinion leaders in business and environment to foster understanding of complex adaptive systems and to reinforce the social connections and identity of residents, employers, and employees. Optional Indicator 4.4. Incorporate monitoring and feedback loops to enable project managers to moderate behavior, be accountable, and adapt as conditions change. Optional Indicator 4.5. Create places that foster community identity and that enhance the experience of neighbors and visitors. Optional
  24. 24. Priority 5. Technical Soundness Identify solutions that reflect best practices that have been tested and proven to work in similar regional contexts Indicator 5.1. Design project to meet existing engineering and building code standards. Required Indicator 5.2. Consider how well project will perform in uncertain times. Optional
  25. 25. Priority 6. Innovation Advance new approaches and techniques that will encourage continual improvement and advancement of best practices serving as models to others in Colorado and beyond. Indicator 6.1. Project teams should consider both traditional and nontraditional alternatives to a proposed project. Optional Indicator 6.2. Consider if natural system functions can be included in project design and operations.Optional Indicator 6.3.TBD Category: Sustainability/Green Infrastructure. Optional
  26. 26. Priority 7. Adaptive Capacity Include flexible and adaptable measures that consider future unknowns of changing climate, economic and social conditions. 7.1. Consider project solutions at a variety of different scales so that impact at any one scale is less likely to impact similar functioning systems at different scales. Optional Indicator 7.2. Consider a diversity of sources to add adaptability and flexibility for infrastructure systems during times of stresses, shocks, or loss of access to resources. Optional Indicator 7.3. Consider cost-effective modular, repeatable strategies. Optional Indicator 7.4. Consider if the project can maintain and enhance connectivity between habitat systems and provide appropriate buffers to allow habitat to serve beneficial functions for plants and wildlife. Optional Indicator 7.5. Consider if the project can enhance the range of mobility connections. Optional Indicator 7.6. Consider if project can store and restore capacity of reserves at each scale so isolated elements can survive for a period on their own. Optional Indicator 7.7. Evaluate potential of creating semi-autonomous systems at the building, neighborhood, and district scale. Optional
  27. 27. Priority 8. Harmonize with Existing Activity Expand, enhance, or leverage work being done to build on existing efforts. Assure outcomes that are environmentally friendly, sustainable, and complementary to the natural setting Indicator 8.1. Identify project design solutions that leverage and enhance the function of existing natural, social, and infrastructure systems.
  28. 28. Priority 9. Long-Term Lasting Impact Create long term gains to the community with solutions that are replicable and sustainable, creating benefits for present and future generations. Indicator 9.1.Account for value of benefit to future generations when identifying preferred project designs.
  29. 29. Projects under $250,000 must only do these required indicators BOULDER COUNTY INDICATOR POINTS DESCRIPTION Indicator 1.1. Apply a business case format that includes consideration of alternatives and robust analysis of those alternatives across the triple bottom line of economics, community, and the environment. Required Prepare a business case that takes an analytical look at the project element alternatives, the costs, the return on investment both in terms of the economy and in value creation to the community and the environment. Indicator 2.1. Satisfy the time-to-recovery performance goal. Required Refer to Time-to-Recovery Performance Goals Matrix (Design team estimate the damage from hazard and the time-to-repair.) Indicator 2.2. Identify gaps and find solutions for moving forward. Required If the project cannot meet the performance goals, then the project team must develop temporary work-arounds or programmatic strategies to meet the required Operational time-to-performance goal. Indicator 2.3. Consider project alternatives that augment capacity and increase buffers from high risk locations such as floodplains, landslide and urban wildfire interface when applicable. Required Provide business case that documents consideration and analysis of alternatives considered for the project. (Can include temporary repairs to meet the minimal or operational phase.) Indicator 3.1. Evaluate benefit of programmatic solutions when developing alternatives for capital projects. Required Conduct triple bottom line analysis in the Business Case that quantifies economic, community, and environmental impacts of the project. Indicator 4.1. Avoid disproportionate negative impacts to vulnerable populations. Required Identify location-based demographics of populations that might be disproportionately impacted by the project. Provide triple bottom line analysis in the business case that evaluates economic, community, and environmental impacts of the project to vulnerable populations. Indicator 5.1. Design project to meet existing engineering and building code standards. Required Project must comply with local code and building standards.
  30. 30. Completed Step 1 and Step 2
  31. 31. Step 3. Prepare business case • Document compliance with the standard • Analyze – Alternatives – Benefits and Costs – Return on investment for the economy, community and the environment. • Appropriately value all relevant direct and indirect impacts, whether financial, environmental or social. • Values are calculated both quantitatively and qualitatively. • Follow business case template to create a common structure and kit of analytical tools
  32. 32. Step 3. Prepare business case BUSINESS CASE TEMPLATE • Background and Project History • Project Description (Use measurable terms if possible) • Timetable • Map • Public Outreach and Consultation Process • Develop and Evaluate Alternatives • Metrics for success / accountability measures • Triple Bottom Line Analysis – Capital and O&M costs for alternatives – Benefits • Direct, Indirect and Monetary • Highlight difficult to quantify benefits such as: – Co-benefits – High risk and vulnerability – Economic benefit cost – Social equity – Technical soundness – Innovation – Adaptive capacity – Harmonize with existing activity – Long term lasting impact. • Net PresentValue (NPV) • Recommendation
  33. 33. Completed Step 1, Step 2, and Step 3
  34. 34. EXAMPLES Next are example projects 1. Jamestown Rain Gauge 2. Wonderland Creek Greenways Improvement Project
  35. 35. Example: Jamestown rain gauge Project is remote sensors to provide early warning for high flows.
  36. 36. Example: Jamestown rain gauge
  37. 37. • Minimal (30%) • Functional (60%) • Operational (90%) Example: Jamestown rain gauge
  38. 38. Rain gauge: functional during the hazard event and operational within 4-8 weeks
  39. 39. Rain gauge: meet or exceed 100-year flood – probably exceed the goal so it doesn’t break when you need it most!
  40. 40. If it does break, the rain gauge needs to be operational again within 4-8 weeks of a hazard
  41. 41. Step 2. Apply the Resilient Design Performance Standard for projects under $250,000 BOULDER COUNTY INDICATOR POINTS DESCRIPTION Indicator 1.1. Apply a business case format that includes consideration of alternatives and robust analysis of those alternatives across the triple bottom line of economics, community, and the environment. Required Prepare a business case that takes an analytical look at the project element alternatives, the costs, the return on investment both in terms of the economy and in value creation to the community and the environment. Indicator 2.1. Satisfy the time-to-recovery performance goal. Required Refer to Time-to-Recovery Performance Goals Matrix (Design team estimate the damage from hazard and the time-to-repair.) Indicator 2.2. Identify gaps and find solutions for moving forward. Required If the project cannot meet the performance goals, then the project team must develop temporary work-arounds or programmatic strategies to meet the required Operational time-to-performance goal. Indicator 2.3. Consider project alternatives that augment capacity and increase buffers from high risk locations such as floodplains, landslide and urban wildfire interface when applicable. Required Provide business case that documents consideration and analysis of alternatives considered for the project. (Can include temporary repairs to meet the minimal or operational phase.) Indicator 3.1. Evaluate benefit of programmatic solutions when developing alternatives for capital projects. Required Conduct triple bottom line analysis in the Business Case that quantifies economic, community, and environmental impacts of the project. Indicator 4.1. Avoid disproportionate negative impacts to vulnerable populations. Required Identify location-based demographics of populations that might be disproportionately impacted by the project. Provide triple bottom line analysis in the business case that evaluates economic, community, and environmental impacts of the project to vulnerable populations. Indicator 5.1. Design project to meet existing engineering and building code standards. Required Project must comply with local code and building standards.
  42. 42. TO DO LIST 1.1 Create Business Case 2.1 SatisfyTime-to-Recovery Performance Goal 2.2 Identify gaps 2.3 Develop broad range of alternatives 4.1 Avoid disproportionate impacts to vulnerable populations 5.1 Design project to meet existing engineering standards Example: Jamestown rain gauge
  43. 43. Example: Wonderland Creek Greenways Improvement Project (retroactive application)
  44. 44. 1. Increases drainage capacity to accommodate the 1% annual chance (100-year) flood, by widening and deepening the channel; adding retaining walls; adding, replacing, and upgrading culverts; and stabilizing channel slopes. 2. Connects the spillway drop structure to Foothills Parkway culverts. 3. Maintains base and low flows of Boulder White Rock Ditch. 4. Provides a new railroad bridge (under separate contract). 5. Extends and modifies theWonderland Creek multi-use path. 6. Provides a new pedestrian bridge. 7. Provides a formal crossing under the BNSF railroad. 8. Preserves existing trees and wetland vegetation. 9. Impacts the sanitary sewer, storm sewer, water lines, electric lines, gas lines, telephone lines, cable, and fiber optics. Project Description
  45. 45. Team Assumptions 1. The project was designed to the effective FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) with consideration given to the interim maps now under development. 2. Detailed hydrologic modeling of the channel was done to specifically identify the impacts of the expected 100- year flood on all structures and properties within and downstream of the project area. 3. All new bridges and affected utility systems are designed to current City, County, State, and Federal standards and will remain usable during and after a 100-year flood. 4. Impacts of the 0.2% annual chance (500-year) flood were not considered. 5. The design has undergone detailed peer review to verify that the design criteria has been met.
  46. 46. Resulting change in the flood plain
  47. 47. What is time-to-recovery goal forWonderland Creek project? – Watershed and Natural Infrastructure Group – Operational goal is 24+ months for the "channel or levy repair" cluster. – Are there other affected facilities or infrastructure? – “Assisted living facility” – The Operational goal is 24+ months Step 1: Look up the time- to-recovery goal
  48. 48. Step 1: Determine hazard level What are hazard levels, existing codes and standards? – City of Boulder uses the up-dated 100-year flood. What is the project design target? • Hmmm. There is zero impact on the assisted living facility for any flood up to and including the 100-year flood after project is complete! • And, the assisted living facility will actually be Operational on Day 0 during a 100-year flood which is way above the cluster target for assisted living facilities • Team picks “Operational” as their design target because it is easy.
  49. 49. Create multiple alternative solutions with design charrette or integrated team: • To address amount and direction of flows • Consider various kinds of control structures Resilient Performance Standard checklist opens the door for creative and alternative solutions. • If there were no check list, teams might default to business-as-usual • If team were to ignore the indicators in the checklist, the project would NOT passGO. Team will meet required indicatorsAND consider enough of the optional indicators to get a score that passes. Team need not select, but must consider indicators. • Use of the indicators helps teams to think more holistically about the project. • Some or maybe many of these options won't save or cost more money • Some options may save money while at the same time providing an enhanced value to the community, economy, and environment • After consideration, the team may decide, "Nah, we’ll just stick with good old hardening. That’s OK! Step 2. Apply the Resilient Design Performance Standard
  50. 50. • Describe alternatives considered • Explain which indicators were considered and rejected or accepted. • Provide analysis and explain why. • Provide net present value comparisons between alternatives across the triple bottom line Step 3. Prepare business case
  51. 51. In my experience, 10% - 25% • When teams use robust alternatives generation and business case approach, about 10-25% of the time they end up with the "green" alternatives often with cost savings and almost always with more value to the community across the triple bottom line.
  52. 52. DISCUSSION 3-17-2016 Presentation by CollinsWoerman team – Steve Moddemeyer,Chris Poland

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