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Folklore, oral history, digital humanities
and metadata
FL2013 Folklore Archives in Ireland - 27 October
2015
Covering:
• The work of the Cork Folklore Project
(a brief revision of some of the material you covered last week)
• Show ...
Cork Folklore Project
• CFP – a public oral
history/folklore archive
since 1996
• Focus on everyday life
• Around 550 inte...
Memory
Map
• 2010-2012
digital project
• Uses excerpts
from CFP
archive
• Short format
for web viewing
Screengrab from the...
Tech Problems
• Interface design – dates very quickly
• Some difficulties with functionality
• (e.g. no anchors to tweet n...
Why bother with digital?
(from the perspective of a small organisation like CFP)
1. Promotion/Outreach:
“…an increasingly ...
New pilot
project
• This is a preview – contrast
interface design with the
old memory map
• This project uses oral
histori...
Map of medieval Cork, from the Pacata Hibernica, 1585–1600. Image from the Cork Past and Present
website (http://www.corkp...
http://pennyjohnston.org/exhibits/neatline/show/north-and-south-main-streets
Cork’s Main
Streets project
• Omeka & Neatlin...
Behind the
scenes
• An Omeka catalogue
of all the excerpts
(audio files) and
pictures
• This is where the files
that are “...
What is metadata?
Metadata is traditionally described as “data about data”
E.g. You have a digital file: this is your orig...
Screenshot from http://www.ucd.ie/irishfolklore/en/manuscripts/theirishvirtualresearchlibraryarchiveivrla/image-2-
thumb,3...
Why do users need metadata?
Metadata provides information about:
• selection of content
• the extent of a resource
• how t...
Problems metadata was developed to address
• Long term sustainability of digital data.
• Ensuring trustworthiness of digit...
Metadata is…
• Usually digital (but increasingly common to hear people refer to catalogue
information in general as “metad...
Dublin Core (DC)
• A standardised form of
metadata
• Includes 15 main elements
• Very simple and general
• http://dublinco...
Using Dublin Core (DC)
•Title
•Creator
•Subject
•Description
•Publisher
•Contributor
•Date
•Type
•Format
•Identifier
•Sour...
Screenshot from http://www.ucd.ie/irishfolklore/en/manuscripts/theirishvirtualresearchlibraryarchiveivrla/image-2-
thumb,3...
Adapting Dublin Core to suit needs
Documentation of how metadata is recorded in always important
In order for metadata to ...
Why do you need to know this?
• Historically, cataloguing was an expert activity (librarians and
archivists)
• Now, adding...
• Omeka gives different
output options for
data
• Includes dcmes
(Dublin Core Metadata
Element Set)
Dublin core
& Omeka
• dcmes-xml outputs the
data in a standardised
DC xml format
• Metadata in this format
will (hopefully) be
accepted by
rep...
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Folklore oral history digital humanities and metadata slideshare copy

  1. 1. Folklore, oral history, digital humanities and metadata FL2013 Folklore Archives in Ireland - 27 October 2015
  2. 2. Covering: • The work of the Cork Folklore Project (a brief revision of some of the material you covered last week) • Show and tell – an “old” digital project and a new iteration • Why engage in digital projects? • What’s behind digital projects from an archival perspective • What do you need to know about metadata?
  3. 3. Cork Folklore Project • CFP – a public oral history/folklore archive since 1996 • Focus on everyday life • Around 550 interviews • Collection is ongoing • Outputs Image © J. Sunderland/Cork Folklore Project
  4. 4. Memory Map • 2010-2012 digital project • Uses excerpts from CFP archive • Short format for web viewing Screengrab from the Cork Memory Map 22 Oct 2015 http://www.ucc.ie/research/memorymap/ Usability studies: How long will users stay on a Web page before leaving? Not very long.
  5. 5. Tech Problems • Interface design – dates very quickly • Some difficulties with functionality • (e.g. no anchors to tweet new stories & difficult to close pop up windows) • Not mobile friendly • Problems updating & adding to site Difficulties might lead you to ask the question “Why bother?” Screengrab from the Cork Memory Map 22 Oct 2015 http://www.ucc.ie/research/memorymap/
  6. 6. Why bother with digital? (from the perspective of a small organisation like CFP) 1. Promotion/Outreach: “…an increasingly important aspect of the business of cultural institutions…” (See http://www.dpconline.org/advice/preservationhandbook/institutional-strategies/outreach) 2. Preservation: Organisational/institutional preservation 3. Expectation: Everything can be found online (“If you’re not in Google you don’t exist”) Very important for archives now – see Apex Archives Portal Europe – promoting a shared European archival heritage (http://www.apex-project.eu/index.php/en/)
  7. 7. New pilot project • This is a preview – contrast interface design with the old memory map • This project uses oral histories of some of the oldest streets in Cork city
  8. 8. Map of medieval Cork, from the Pacata Hibernica, 1585–1600. Image from the Cork Past and Present website (http://www.corkpastandpresent.ie/mapsimages/corkinoldmaps/pacatahiberniamap1585- 1600/) Old Cork • Medieval city first built on islands • Old main streets the “historic spine” • Herringbone pattern of lanes (many now gone) • Commercial focus of the city shifted in the 18th & 19th centuries • Decline a recurring theme today
  9. 9. http://pennyjohnston.org/exhibits/neatline/show/north-and-south-main-streets Cork’s Main Streets project • Omeka & Neatline – open source (compatibility & sustainability) • Neatline – built to display interpretative, subjective stories • Method as “a path to argument” (Nowviskie et al. 2013, 693) • An ongoing process
  10. 10. Behind the scenes • An Omeka catalogue of all the excerpts (audio files) and pictures • This is where the files that are “called” on the map are uploaded to • Metadata is used to describe each entry
  11. 11. What is metadata? Metadata is traditionally described as “data about data” E.g. You have a digital file: this is your original data. You want to be able to find it again so you add give it a meaningful name or title. This is extra data that you have added to your original data – it is metadata. For the folklorist, metadata is the digital equivalent of catalogue information
  12. 12. Screenshot from http://www.ucd.ie/irishfolklore/en/manuscripts/theirishvirtualresearchlibraryarchiveivrla/image-2- thumb,35985,en.html accessed 26 October 2015
  13. 13. Why do users need metadata? Metadata provides information about: • selection of content • the extent of a resource • how the material was selected • how often it is updated • who is responsible for creation, publishing and maintenance of the resource
  14. 14. Problems metadata was developed to address • Long term sustainability of digital data. • Ensuring trustworthiness of digital resources. • Organising the web (and other digital environments). • Finding things on the web (and in other digital environments). • Providing information about the resources.
  15. 15. Metadata is… • Usually digital (but increasingly common to hear people refer to catalogue information in general as “metadata”). • Usually not seen by humans. (Exceptions?) • No longer that important for findability online (in the early days metadata was widely abused & it is now not widely used by search engines). • Important for usability. (It gives the user essential information about digital resources & is particularly useful for academic or expert users.) • Important for the sustainability of digital materials online. (Standards for recording metadata developed to allow for migration and re-use.)
  16. 16. Dublin Core (DC) • A standardised form of metadata • Includes 15 main elements • Very simple and general • http://dublincore.org/ Alternative archival standard metadata schema include EAD (Encoded Archival Description) – massive and complex (http://www.loc.gov/ead/) Screenshot http://dublincore.org/ last accessed 26 October 2015
  17. 17. Using Dublin Core (DC) •Title •Creator •Subject •Description •Publisher •Contributor •Date •Type •Format •Identifier •Source •Language •Relation •Coverage •Rights There are 15 CORE elements in DC:
  18. 18. Screenshot from http://www.ucd.ie/irishfolklore/en/manuscripts/theirishvirtualresearchlibraryarchiveivrla/image-2- thumb,35985,en.html accessed 26 October 2015
  19. 19. Adapting Dublin Core to suit needs Documentation of how metadata is recorded in always important In order for metadata to be sustainable, it has to be accompanied by documentation. The resource and its metadata together provide a rationale for why the resource was created in the first place (and therefore a rationale about why it should be preserved in the future) The more information that you provide, the easier it is to migrate or reconstruct the dataset • E.G. IASA guidelines • E.G. Documentation
  20. 20. Why do you need to know this? • Historically, cataloguing was an expert activity (librarians and archivists) • Now, adding metadata can be the responsibility of almost anyone within an organisation • Many (most) repositories will not accept data unless it is accompanied by standardised metadata (therefore, problems for sustaining/preserving a resource without metadata)
  21. 21. • Omeka gives different output options for data • Includes dcmes (Dublin Core Metadata Element Set) Dublin core & Omeka
  22. 22. • dcmes-xml outputs the data in a standardised DC xml format • Metadata in this format will (hopefully) be accepted by repositories • See Digital Repository of Ireland DC requirements (http://dri.ie/sites/defa ult/files/files/dri-dublin- core-metadata- guidelines.pdf) Metadata output

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