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Roadway to Independence Team #07185
<ul><li>Our design team of ecologists, landscape architects and civil engineers explored the ecological and social linkage...
3 Integrated Principles of a Reclaimed Roadway <ul><ul><li>Transferable Renewable Technology (TRT)   </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Low Impact Development (LID) <ul><li>Our design creates a broad, vegetated median that restores natural bio-filtration ser...
Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) <ul><li>Landscape design responds to the cultural and historical context of the site by ...
Transferable Renewable Technology (TRT) <ul><li>Incorporates recycled and industrial  by-product materials into recycled m...
Perspective Section Not To Scale
On-Site Storm Water Treatment (LID) <ul><li>Compared to the background condition of “no road”, the proposed design reduces...
Recycled Media Filtration Mixture (LID) <ul><li>Rice Hull Ash (RHA), Recycled Glass (RG), Low-nutrient Compost and Bottom ...
Storm Water Detention Metrics (LID) <ul><li>Modeled the roadway in HEC-HMS. </li></ul><ul><li>Developed a composite Curve ...
Pre and Post Development Hydrograph (LID)
Linear Detention / Water Quality Pond (LID) <ul><li>All run-off is treated for water quality.  The water quality pond exte...
On-Site Storm Water Treatment (LID) <ul><li>The median along the entire roadway has a filter pond with a 20 ft flat bottom...
Capturing Storm Water Run-off (LID) <ul><li>Achieved capturing 1.3” rain event.  Exceeded the goal of capturing 1” of run-...
Shallower and Wider Ditches (LID) <ul><li>The roadway cross section provides a wide, shallow drainage channel in the media...
Shallower and Wider Ditches (LID) <ul><li>Roadway median captures and treats storm water within itself, minimizing the cos...
Raising the Outfall Elevation (LID) <ul><ul><li>Our design concept substantially reduces the depth required for the outfal...
Testing the Filter Media Mixture (LID) <ul><li>The filter media in the bio-filtration basins contains rice hull ash, recyc...
Landscape Plan (CSS) <ul><li>Musical interpretive roadway pavement. </li></ul><ul><li>46 plant bed clusters within median ...
Musical Interpretive Roadway (CSS) <ul><li>The northbound lane of Independence Parkway is the route that the Texas Republi...
Native Plant Palette (CSS) <ul><li>46 different clusters of native single species plantings, along with Live Oak trees, wi...
Implementing San Jacinto Masterplan (CSS) <ul><li>As with many Harris County roadways, this project will result in excavat...
Cost Evaluation (TRT) <ul><li>Reclaimed Roadway vs. Conventional Roadway  </li></ul><ul><li>Capital Cost Savings of 12% (o...
Carbon Footprint (TRT) <ul><li>Understanding how the innovative materials and practices proposed for Independence Parkway ...
Ecosystem Services (TRT) <ul><li>Ecosystem Services are goods and services of direct or indirect benefit to humans that ar...
Sustainable Sites Initiative (TRT) <ul><li>The Sustainable Sites Initiative is a newly released rating system for landscap...
Sustainable Sites Initiative (TRT) <ul><li>Our design concept would achieve approximately 140 to 155 Sustainable Sites Ini...
Community Benefits of a Reclaimed Roadway <ul><li>Low Impact Development </li></ul><ul><li>Low impact materials as well as...
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GREEN ROADWAY Team 07185 Competition Submittal

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Electronic submittal for team on Pate Engineers, TBG Partners and Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

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GREEN ROADWAY Team 07185 Competition Submittal

  1. 1. Roadway to Independence Team #07185
  2. 2. <ul><li>Our design team of ecologists, landscape architects and civil engineers explored the ecological and social linkages in promoting sustainable development of Independence Parkway. </li></ul><ul><li>Our solution establishes an innovative design for a low impact development roadway corridor. </li></ul><ul><li>Design principles can be implemented for widespread application in Harris County and throughout Texas. </li></ul>Design Approach: Reclaimed Roadway
  3. 3. 3 Integrated Principles of a Reclaimed Roadway <ul><ul><li>Transferable Renewable Technology (TRT) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using exportable technology, materials and approaches for roadway construction practices for widespread implementation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Low Impact Development (LID) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduce amount of storm water runoff by restoring the hydrologic </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>function of the site and emulating pre-development hydrology. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop a design that responds to its physical setting and enhances or preserves aesthetic, historic and environmental resources while maintaining safety and mobility. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Low Impact Development (LID) <ul><li>Our design creates a broad, vegetated median that restores natural bio-filtration services to the soil. </li></ul><ul><li>Improves water quality and increases detention capacity. </li></ul><ul><li>Increases soil porosity and infiltration rates through the use of recycled materials. </li></ul><ul><li>Minimizes the use of drainage pipe to convey storm water and reduces outfall depth requirements. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces the capital costs of roadway construction by 12% compared to conventional roadway design. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS) <ul><li>Landscape design responds to the cultural and historical context of the site by incorporating interpretive design elements relating to the adjacent San Jacinto Battleground. </li></ul><ul><li>Responds to the natural environment by restoring the coastal prairie setting with large open fields scattered with tree clusters and native plant massing. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Transferable Renewable Technology (TRT) <ul><li>Incorporates recycled and industrial by-product materials into recycled media filtration mixture instead of importing mined materials with a high embodied energy demand. </li></ul><ul><li>Re-introduces native grasses to increase maintenance efficiency. </li></ul><ul><li>Technology is applicable for roadways in the Houston area and beyond. </li></ul>Recycled Glass Bottom Ash Low-Nutrient Compost
  7. 7. Perspective Section Not To Scale
  8. 8. On-Site Storm Water Treatment (LID) <ul><li>Compared to the background condition of “no road”, the proposed design reduces the flow rate of run-off leaving the roadway by approximately 20%. By over-infiltrating to partially make up for impervious cover around the project site, the system performs more effectively the function of the roadway without adverse effects on the local ecology. </li></ul><ul><li>The goal is to ensure greater opportunity for infiltration than current conditions and decrease flooding potential while increasing traffic capacity. Overall “perviousness” of the right-of-way has been increased by placing the recycled media filtration mixture within the median, though the amount of pavement did not decrease. </li></ul><ul><li>The shallower, wider roadway median and channels convey the run-off rather than conventional deeper pipes. This raises the outfall depth as compared to conventional development. </li></ul><ul><li>Cut and fill analysis: The 52,000 CY cut material exceeds conventional excavation. This is offset by reduced infrastructure costs and impacts including reduced pipe-length and excavation impacts at the channel outfall. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Recycled Media Filtration Mixture (LID) <ul><li>Rice Hull Ash (RHA), Recycled Glass (RG), Low-nutrient Compost and Bottom Ash (BA) are all local and regional waste products given new life as filtration media. This combination proved to have valuable filtration properties when tested: Initial in-house testing demonstrated that a mixture of all four materials had an infiltration rate of approximately 30 ft./day, and a void space of approximately 42%. In addition, RHA’s high field capacity makes it a valuable soil amendment for plants during drought periods. </li></ul>Rice Hull Ash Recycled Glass Low-Nutrient Compost Bottom Ash
  10. 10. Storm Water Detention Metrics (LID) <ul><li>Modeled the roadway in HEC-HMS. </li></ul><ul><li>Developed a composite Curve Number (CN) for the proposed roadway and the background condition of “no road”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The CN used in the provided existing condition resulted in little change between proposed and existing. To allow this design to be translated to other areas, we compared the proposed to an undeveloped condition. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Composite CN for proposed roadway was 87.5 (50ft of impervious roadway, 70ft of Class D soils grassed area). Conservatively, CN does not account for the increased infiltration rate of the median. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Water Quality ponds add a retention element and hold the water to be filtered through the media. This was not included in the detention calculations resulting in a more conservative design. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The water quality ponds and detention pond cascade along the roadway, utilizing median breaks as hydraulic control structures. </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Pre and Post Development Hydrograph (LID)
  12. 12. Linear Detention / Water Quality Pond (LID) <ul><li>All run-off is treated for water quality. The water quality pond extends along the entire length of the roadway within the median. Run-off from the roadways is treated in the medians. </li></ul><ul><li>As natural topography falls along the northern 30% of the project site, the effectiveness of a detention pond is reduced. </li></ul><ul><li>For detention in this area, the lower 30% of the roadway is allowed to discharge freely (but still treated through the filter media) while the upper 70% is detained, thereby increasing the effectiveness of the overall detention. The combined run-off rates of the pond and the lower 30% of the roadway are less than the run-off rate of the background condition of “no road”. </li></ul>
  13. 13. On-Site Storm Water Treatment (LID) <ul><li>The median along the entire roadway has a filter pond with a 20 ft flat bottom with 36” deep of recycled media filtration mixture. </li></ul><ul><li>Void space in the media: greater than 40%. </li></ul><ul><li>The roadway drains toward the linear detention / water quality pond. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most of the runoff is retained in the pond until infiltration can occur. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The volume of voids within the media is not included in calculating the pond volume. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>An overflow culvert with a flow line above the WQ volume allows for conveyance of 3-year storm event. </li></ul></ul>
  14. 14. Capturing Storm Water Run-off (LID) <ul><li>Achieved capturing 1.3” rain event. Exceeded the goal of capturing 1” of run-off. </li></ul><ul><li>Bio-filtration ponds are documented to remove pollutants and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) through the use of chemical, biological and physical properties of plants, microbes and soil. Bio-filtration ponds improve water quality, reduce infrastructure costs and require low maintenance. Our design will remove more than 96% TSS, which exceeds the 80% TSS removal requirement. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Shallower and Wider Ditches (LID) <ul><li>The roadway cross section provides a wide, shallow drainage channel in the median. This provides storm water conveyance in lieu of storm sewer. </li></ul><ul><li>The channel conveys a 3-year high intensity storm. In a high rainfall volume storm it also provides for detention. The water quality volume contained in the soil is not included in conveyance calculations. This design achieves conveyance capacity beyond a 3-year storm event. </li></ul><ul><li>In the 100 year storm event, median breaks act as wide broad-crested weirs about 1’ below elevation of roadway. Culverts beneath the weir allow for conveyance of smaller storm events and detention control. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Shallower and Wider Ditches (LID) <ul><li>Roadway median captures and treats storm water within itself, minimizing the costs and impacts of piping storm water away from site. </li></ul><ul><li>Paving is graded to drain to median to minimize the amount of drainage pipe required. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Raising the Outfall Elevation (LID) <ul><ul><li>Our design concept substantially reduces the depth required for the outfall channel. An outfall channel, conveying drainage from the road right-of-way to an existing storm water drainage channel, is a primary consideration in the improvement of Harris County roadways. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using a shallow channel for storm water conveyance/detention along the roadway provides for the shallower outfall channel – reducing right-of-way requirements and capital cost. Outfall capacity from county roadways has always been a key consideration in the County, and it will increase in importance as improvements extend into the western portions of the County where drainage depth is a critical issue. </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Testing the Filter Media Mixture (LID) <ul><li>The filter media in the bio-filtration basins contains rice hull ash, recycled glass, bottom ash and low-nutrient compost. </li></ul><ul><li>This has twice the lifespan of a sand filter and will reduce maintenance over the life of the roadway compared to conventional measures. Plant roots maintain media porosity over time. </li></ul><ul><li>The proposed design over-treats the run-off. Even if infiltration is reduced over time, the goals of the program are achieved. </li></ul><ul><li>Unlike sand, a mined material often used in filtration media, the proposed media mixture gives new life to local waste products (simultaneously augmenting the local economy) that would otherwise end up in the landfill. </li></ul>
  19. 19. Landscape Plan (CSS) <ul><li>Musical interpretive roadway pavement. </li></ul><ul><li>46 plant bed clusters within median – represents the 46 days between the fall of Alamo and Battle of San Jacinto. </li></ul><ul><li>18 tree clusters - represents the 18 minutes of the Battle of San Jacinto. </li></ul><ul><li>10 Project Stars Icons – the freedom of Texas from Mexico won at the Battle of San Jacinto led to annexation and to the Mexican War, resulting in the addition of 10 States to the United States of America. </li></ul>A B C D B C D A
  20. 20. Musical Interpretive Roadway (CSS) <ul><li>The northbound lane of Independence Parkway is the route that the Texas Republic forces traveled as they made their way to the Battle of San Jacinto. Along with cries of “Remember the Alamo!” and “Remember Goliad!”, a drummer provided cadence for the Texas force’s advance by drumming the beat of the popular song of a day, “Will You Come to the Bower”. </li></ul><ul><li>The northbound outside lane of the Parkway will incorporate scored and grooved concrete to play the tune of “Will You Come to the Bower” when traveling at approximately 35 MPH. </li></ul>Click picture to watch video if web enabled.
  21. 21. Native Plant Palette (CSS) <ul><li>46 different clusters of native single species plantings, along with Live Oak trees, will be planted in the median. The sides of the road will contain a native Coastal Prairie seed mix. The table below represents a sampling of these median and roadside species. </li></ul>Common Name Latin Name Common Name Latin Name Carolina Wolfberry Lycium Carolinianum Big Bliuestem Andropogon gerardii Virginia Sweetspire Itea Virginica White Guara Gaura Lindheimeri Scarlet Rosemallow Hibiscus Laevis Indian Grass Sorghastrum nutans Sideoats Grama Bouteloua Curtipendula Switchgrass Panicum virgatum Bushy Bluestem Andropogon Glomeratus Partridge Pea Chamaecrista fasciculata Little Bluestem Schizachyrium Scoparium Inland Seaoats Chasmanthium Latifolium Gulf Coast Muhly Muhlenbergia Capillaris Maximilian Sunflower Helianthus Maximiliani Obedient Plant Physostegia Intermedia Great Coneflower Rudbeckia Maxima
  22. 22. Implementing San Jacinto Masterplan (CSS) <ul><li>As with many Harris County roadways, this project will result in excavated material haul-off. Identified as a restoration element in the San Jacinto Masterplan Guidelines (2004), the reflecting pond at the monument site will be filled. </li></ul><ul><li>The proposed roadway spoils will restore a core element of the San Jacinto Battleground to its historic character. </li></ul>
  23. 23. Cost Evaluation (TRT) <ul><li>Reclaimed Roadway vs. Conventional Roadway </li></ul><ul><li>Capital Cost Savings of 12% (over project life-cycle costing) </li></ul><ul><li>Conventional Roadway Reclaimed Roadway </li></ul><ul><li>Comparison Project Independence Pkwy </li></ul><ul><li>Component Cost Per LF Cost Per LF Delta </li></ul><ul><li>Site Preparation $53 $53 --- </li></ul><ul><li>Paving $567 $567 --- </li></ul><ul><li>Signals $85 $85 --- </li></ul><ul><li>Excavation $50 $75 $25 </li></ul><ul><li>Storm Sewer $200 $25 ($175) </li></ul><ul><li>Filtration Pond --- $70 $70 </li></ul><ul><li>Temp Paving $45 $5 ($40) </li></ul><ul><li>Total $1,000 $880 ($120) </li></ul><ul><li>Assuming bond financing, the realized savings in financing cost (exclusive of principal cost) over the life of the bonds is $80/LF, which would fund one replacement of the filter media in the filtration pond, if needed over the design life of the roadway. </li></ul>
  24. 24. Carbon Footprint (TRT) <ul><li>Understanding how the innovative materials and practices proposed for Independence Parkway will impact the environment is critical. </li></ul><ul><li>Significant reductions in carbon emissions were attained by sourcing incoming materials locally and finding local re-uses for any material leaving the roadway (when compared with conventional practices). </li></ul>Material Distances from Site
  25. 25. Ecosystem Services (TRT) <ul><li>Ecosystem Services are goods and services of direct or indirect benefit to humans that are produced by ecosystem processes involving the interaction of living and nonliving elements. </li></ul><ul><li>The Roadway to Independence provides the following ecosystem services: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Carbon sequestration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local and global climate regulation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Air and water cleansing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Water supply and regulation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Erosion and sediment control </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Native habitat restoration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pollination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Habitat </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural benefits </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. Sustainable Sites Initiative (TRT) <ul><li>The Sustainable Sites Initiative is a newly released rating system for landscape sustainability developed by the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, the U.S. Botanic Garden, and over 30 experts from around the country. </li></ul><ul><li>We have applied this rating system to the Independence Parkway to assess the sustainability of our design. </li></ul>
  27. 27. Sustainable Sites Initiative (TRT) <ul><li>Our design concept would achieve approximately 140 to 155 Sustainable Sites Initiative points (out of 250) making it a 2-3 star project. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples of SSI credits achieved include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 1.5: Select brownfields or greyfields for development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 2.1: Use an integrated site development process </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 3.5: Manage storm water onsite </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 3.6: Protect and enhance onsite water resources and receiving water quality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 4.7: Use native plants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 4.9: Restore plant communities native to the eco-region </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 5.5: Use recycled content materials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 5.7: Use regional materials </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 6.3: Promote sustainability awareness and education </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 6.4: Protect and maintain unique cultural and historical places </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 6.5: Provide for optimum site accessibility, safety, and wayfinding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 7.4: Divert construction and demolition materials from disposal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 7.5: Reuse or recycle vegetation, rocks, and soil generated during construction </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit 9.2: Innovation in site design </li></ul></ul>
  28. 28. Community Benefits of a Reclaimed Roadway <ul><li>Low Impact Development </li></ul><ul><li>Low impact materials as well as low impact development. </li></ul><ul><li>Enhanced quality of life values through improved water quality and stormwater detention. </li></ul><ul><li>Context Sensitive Solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Interpretive experience and an enhanced connection with Texas history. </li></ul><ul><li>Transferable Renewable Technology </li></ul><ul><li>“ Cradle-to-cradle” recycling of industrial waste products. </li></ul><ul><li>Lower lifecycle costs and a far more sustainable roadway development. </li></ul>

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