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Getting to grips with JUSP 4th May 2017

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Presentation from introductory JUSP workshop run on 4th May 2017 in Manchester.

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Getting to grips with JUSP 4th May 2017

  1. 1. Getting to grips with JUSP04/05/2017 Manchester
  2. 2. Welcome 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 2
  3. 3. What we’ll cover this morning »What is JUSP? »JUSP journal data »Tour and demo of JUSP for journals »Examples of how libraries use the data »Hands-on activities »Lunch Morning session 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 3
  4. 4. Introductions »Name »Organisation »What would you like to learn today? 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 4
  5. 5. Introduction to JUSP for journals 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 5
  6. 6. What is JUSP? The Journal Usage Statistics Portal provides a FREE “one stop shop” for libraries to access and download usage statistics from a wide range of journal publishers. 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 6
  7. 7. How it all started … »Interest in a one stop shop for COUNTER journal reports dates back to studies carried out in 2005 and before »Jisc Collections commissioned various parties to develop a demonstrator/prototype service for a small subset of publishers (Elsevier, Springer, OUP) and 5 libraries »JUSP was launched into service in early 2010 and has rapidly expanded ever since »E-books were added in February 2016 »Additional reports JR2/JR5 added mid 2016 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 7
  8. 8. Who provides JUSP? »Jisc (formerly staff atThe University of Manchester) – day to day running, data collection, database admin, support, website, technical development »Jisc Collections – publisher agreements »Evidence Base – user evaluation, surveys and support »Cranfield University – technical development (SUSHI) 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 8
  9. 9. What does JUSP contain - journals? »COUNTER journal reports for 80 publishers and several intermediaries »Data back to January 2009 where available »Expanding publisher list »Around 360 million individual data entries »Data for more than 200 institutions »Title lists and deal information »Over 30 reports, charts and tables providing access to the data in a wide range of forms!04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 9
  10. 10. What JUSP does NOT contain »Database reports … BUT! »Cost information »Article level stats »Unchecked data!!! »Data for non COUNTER compliant publishers 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 10
  11. 11. Reports and features »journal level reports, including JR1; gateway data; JR1 minus JR1a and JR1 GOA; journal search; JR2; JR5 »summary reports, including SCONUL; top titles; breakdown of usage by date range and publisher; academic and publisher year data; trends over time »titles and deals reports including titles v deals; title lists; comparison of deals »Usage profiling reports – compare your site with others in your Jisc band / peer groups / region / consortium 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 11
  12. 12. How we work with the data »SUSHI – Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative: machine to machine »We collect approximately 10,000 reports per month »Backdata / new publishers or sites / missing accounts / restated data »Every report undergoes visual checks, plus automated checking software runs 20 tests prior to loading »Any missing data or global errors reported to publishers »No reports added unless we’re happy!!! 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 12
  13. 13. Benefits for libraries - 1 »One account not dozens »All report gathering done centrally »All data verified prior to loading »Costs/time savings »Reports and data presentation save a lot of time »New reports take effort out of calculations »Restated data 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 13
  14. 14. Benefits for libraries - 2 »Help with SCONUL return »Usage profiling and peer group comparisons »“Core” title tracking / ad hoc reports »Export reports and data in various ways »Designed for and by the library community »More clout with publishers over issues 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 14
  15. 15. Training and support »Bespoke training alongside standard courses »Online FAQs and getting started materials »Guides to all reports »Dozens of webinars and online demonstrations – recordings available »Papers, presentations, event slides and recordings »Full support service by email helpdesk: jusp@jisc.ac.uk 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 15
  16. 16. Interoperability »Other usage stats packages e.g. Ustat / ALMA / Millennium / Serials Solutions 360 COUNTER »KB+ http://www.kbplus.ac.uk »SUNCAT / other »Jisc LSS project development »JUSP offers a SUSHI server for exporting data 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 16
  17. 17. Continuing development »JUSP is under continual development with many new features planned for 2017/18 »… see later! 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 17
  18. 18. Demo of JUSP for journals https://jusp.jisc.ac.uk 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 18
  19. 19. How are libraries using JUSP 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 19
  20. 20. Using journal usage data »Informing renewal decisions »Regular reporting (including SCONUL) »Reporting to management »Ad hoc requests »Responding to enquires 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 20
  21. 21. DMU ScienceDirect »Subscribed v Non- subscribed titles identified by KB+ »Combine JR1 from JUSP and journal list prices from Elsevier »Shared with subject libraries for evaluation »http://mitchley.our.dmu.ac.uk/2017/04/11/using-jusp- counter-jr1-usage-data-to-review-dmu-librarys- sciencedirect-journal-titles/ Identifying substitutions 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 21
  22. 22. Dashboards and KPIs »Bar chart showing usage in previous and current year to date »Part of a library dashboard for management »“What I get out of JUSP covers about 80% of our e-journal usage and only takes half a minute” University of Edinburgh »Overview of key trends at collection level »“We also use JUSP’s ‘Titles with the highest use’ report (academic year) in conjunction with reports from EBSCO, to generate a list of the most heavily used titles” Leeds Beckett University 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 22
  23. 23. Practice 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 23
  24. 24. Exercises 1. An overview of usage for a publisher – using a variety of reports to get a full picture of usage for a publisher package 2. Identifying titles for subscription or purchase – focusing on the JR2 but also looking atJR1 3. Evidence for journal substitutions - looking at how you could use JUSP to review core subscriptions within a publisher package Topics 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 24
  25. 25. Feedback »Which reports do you think you will find most useful? » Did anything surprise you? »What will you take away? 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 25
  26. 26. Lunch 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 26
  27. 27. Welcome (back) 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 27
  28. 28. What we’ll cover this afternoon »JUSP book data »Demo of JUSP for books »Examples of how libraries use book usage data »Hands-on activities »Future developments Afternoon session 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 28
  29. 29. What does JUSP contain? - ebooks »COUNTER book reports for 18 publishers »Data back to January 2014 where available »Expanding publisher list »Data for more than 200 institutions »A number of reports, charts and tables providing access to the data in growing range of forms. Book portal went live in February 2016. 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 29
  30. 30. ebooks - Reports »BR1 – successful title requests by month and title »BR2 – successful section requests by month and title »BR3 – access denials, by month, title and category »Top titles (calendar and academic years) »Trends over time »SCONUL returns Note: no BR1 data currently in JUSP 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 30
  31. 31. ebooks – Current Publishers »ACS »ASCE »BioOne »Elsevier »Emerald »Future Medicine »ICE »IEEE »IOP »OUP »Project MUSE »RSC »SIAM »Springer »T&F (encyclopedias only) »Thieme »Wageningen »Wiley 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 31
  32. 32. ebooks – Aggregators under development »Askews & Holts »CREDO Reference »EBSCOhost »ProQuest Combined report with data from publishers probably not possible due to lack of common identifiers. 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 32
  33. 33. How we work with the data »SUSHI – Standardized Usage Statistics Harvesting Initiative: machine to machine »We collect approximately 4,000 reports per month »Backdata / new publishers or sites / missing accounts / restated data »Every report undergoes visual checks, plus automated checking software runs 20 tests prior to loading »Any missing data or global errors reported to publishers »No reports added unless we’re happy!!! 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 33
  34. 34. Benefits for libraries »One account not dozens »All report gathering done centrally »All data verified prior to loading »Costs/time savings »New reports take effort out of calculations »Restated data »Designed for and by the library community »More clout with publishers over issues 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 34
  35. 35. How are libraries using book data? Laura 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 35
  36. 36. Uses of book usage data Reporting • Management • Subject and liaison librarians • academics • SCONUL Collection development decisions • Policy decisions • Subscription renewals Identifying titles for purchase • BR3 • Single/multi-user • Extra ‘copies’ • New titles and packages Providing evidence to support purchasing models • Individual titles • PDA/DDA • EBA Promotion and awareness • Low use • Value 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 36
  37. 37. Challenges for libraries E-book usage discussion forum - July 2016 Report available: http://jusp.jisc.ac.uk/news/JUSP-ebook- discussion-forum-report-20160714.pdf E-books usage statistics research project Report expected soon 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 37 Lack of common identifiers Lack of accurate title lists Inconsistencies in measuring ‘use’ Time consuming and inefficient
  38. 38. BR3 »Check for new editions of books that publishers »Published sometimes replace editions and users linked through to content they can’t access Kings College London »Adding titles to wish list »Previously purchased vol. 1, but noticed turnaways on vol. 2 »monitored over a couple of years, considered as part of wider acquisition The Open University 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 38
  39. 39. Comparing purchasing models »Rather than relying on a single count, used a range of metrics to provide a fuller picture › number of titles purchases and accessed › total usage, usage ranges, cost and averages »One off exercise – a lot of work! »Evidence to support future acquisitions The Open University 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 39
  40. 40. Demo of JUSP for books https://jusp.jisc.ac.uk 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 40
  41. 41. 1. Checking for available data – find out what is cover 2. Reporting – using summary reports to show high level usage 3. Identifying additional purchases – using data to inform decisions 4. Reviewing e-book subscriptions – e-book data as part of renewals process Exercises Using book usage reports 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 41
  42. 42. Future developments 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 42
  43. 43. Future developments »More publishers (ongoing) »Books: BR1 and aggregators (in progress) »Platform, database and multimedia reports (Q3 2017) »Tableau visualisations (imminent!!) »COUNTER 5 (pilot 2017, service ?) 04/05/2017 Getting to grips with JUSP 43

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