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Media Strategies

  1. 1. MINNESOTA ASSOCIATION OF CVBS I JUNE 2, 2021
  2. 2. Jennifer Hellman Principal/COO @CrisisCoach Introduction
  3. 3. About Goff Public
  4. 4. CURRENT STATE OF THE MEDIA (AND SOCIAL MEDIA)
  5. 5. Where do you get your news?
  6. 6. How people prefer to get news 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% News websites, apps and social media Radio TV Print Pew research from the Twin Cities metro area, 2021.
  7. 7. Communications have changed dramatically – and the trends started long before the pandemic
  8. 8. The power of social media ◦ People are turning to alternative sources of news more than ever before ◦ 51% of U.S. adults report increased social media use during the pandemic ◦ A single post can spark a worldwide movement
  9. 9. Images are powerful
  10. 10. Images are powerful
  11. 11. Images are powerful
  12. 12. “Activists gather outside of Minneapolis Police Union Chief Bob Kroll’s home" “Electoral college protests rally at Minnesota Capitol" Activists are organizing more quickly “Protesters gather at Line 3 construction site in Aitkin County"
  13. 13. News media is still influential ◦ 73% of U.S. adults trust their local newspapers (59% for national newspapers) ◦ 85% of U.S. adults seek out credible, third-party articles and reviews when considering a purchase ◦ 80% of business decision-markers prefer to learn about companies in news articles versus advertisements
  14. 14. The rise of pay-for-play As newspapers close their doors, there has been an increase in sponsored news content.
  15. 15. Paid influencers are everywhere
  16. 16. …and working with influencers can be controversial “Minneapolis abandons plan to pay influencers during Derek Chauvin trial” “State paid Andrew Zimmern $57,000 to promote Minnesota as tourist spot”
  17. 17. THINK LIKE A REPORTER
  18. 18. What motivates reporters? ◦ Producing stories that drive change or question the status quo ◦ Telling stories in a compelling way ◦ Their editors ◦ Getting a story first ◦ Audience metrics – shares, comments ◦ Getting recognized (awards) or getting promoted to a larger market ◦ Having their stories go national “CNN crew arrested by Minnesota State Patrol amid George Floyd protests”
  19. 19. Building relationships ◦ Understand what they’re interested in covering ◦ Get to know them over a professional coffee ◦ Follow up with them after a story ▪ To thank them – not just provide corrections ◦ Act as a community resource ▪ Be available as a subject matter expert, even for stories that don’t immediately impact your interests ◦ REMEMBER: There is no such thing as a casual conversation with a reporter How do you develop relationships with anyone?
  20. 20. THE SEVEN CATEGORIES OF NEWS
  21. 21. There’s no magic wand
  22. 22. News is… timely “Otter Tail County hearing pushback on Governor's Fishing Opener”
  23. 23. News is… unique “Warroad, Minn., comes together on a miles-long skate path”
  24. 24. News… affects a large audience “Mayo Clinic Health System to permanently close 5 locations”
  25. 25. News is… controversial “Church identified as hate group granted permit in Minnesota town”
  26. 26. News… follows trends “Mankato Brewery, Hy-Vee team up for pop-up vaccine clinic”
  27. 27. News is… clickable “Video: Storm chaser's vehicle totaled in violent collision with deer”
  28. 28. News is… localized “Younger than that now: On Bob Dylan’s 80th birthday, Minnesota politicians weigh in on their favorite Dylan songs”
  29. 29. The more components a story has, the more newsworthy it is
  30. 30. Why did this make news? “Summer of travel: Minnesota businesses expect significant recovery” Categories of news: ❑ Timely ❑ Unique ❑ Affects a large audience ❑ Controversial ❑ Follows trends ❑ Clickable ❑ Localized
  31. 31. Why did this make news? “With Canada closed, northern Minnesota lake community sets voluntary walleye limit out of overfishing concern” Categories of news: ❑ Timely ❑ Unique ❑ Affects a large audience ❑ Controversial ❑ Follows trends ❑ Clickable ❑ Localized
  32. 32. CREATE MESSAGES PEOPLE CONNECT WITH
  33. 33. COMMUNICATION IS AN ART, NOT A SCIENCE
  34. 34. Messaging best practices ◦ “Why” before “what” ◦ Know your elevator speech ◦ Think of messages in themes – no more than three ◦ How you share them: ▪ Use facts and figures ▪ Include a call to action
  35. 35. REPUTATIONS
  36. 36. Every community has their fair share of challenges There’s no region free of controversy.
  37. 37. “‘We must restore peace’: Minneapolis burns during 2nd night of protests over George Floyd’s death”
  38. 38. “Sheriff says tree placed on Highway 61 out of fear of ‘spreading COVID-19 in Cook County’”
  39. 39. “Suspect charged with 7 felonies in connection to St. Cloud Wells Fargo hostage standoff”
  40. 40. “What’s the deal with the walleye crisis on Mille Lacs?”
  41. 41. “Man arrested in connection to hate messages at Fargo-Moorhead mosque”
  42. 42. Any small town has the potential to be the next story in the New York Times “A ‘community for all’? Not so fast, this Wisconsin county says.”
  43. 43. Be willing to change and re-invent yourself “Big bass fishing tournament heads to Mille Lacs Lake” ◦ There are also many wonderful opportunities ◦ Highlight and celebrate your region’s unique culture
  44. 44. BEST PRACTICES
  45. 45. Best practices ◦ Survey your members frequently for story opportunities ◦ Workshop your tourism campaigns ◦ Set up Google alerts for your region and key businesses contributing to tourism ◦ Become a curator of your community’s positive news coverage ▪Share widely ▪Specifically point out why you’re sharing ◦ Be the champion of your community
  46. 46. QUESTIONS?
  47. 47. Stay in touch! Jennifer@goffpublic.com @crisiscoach

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