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How to create an effective MVP

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In week 4 of the Grow it course, I taught a lesson on how to evaluate the state of a digital product and how to improve it

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How to create an effective MVP

  1. 1. G R O W I T | W E E K 4 - C L A S S 1 P R O D U C TD A N N Y S E T I AWA N | 3 1 O C T 2 0 1 6
  2. 2. OBJECTIVES By the end of this lesson you’ll be able to… • Describe the importance of value and cost in product development • Define the core task for your product • Translate value proposition (Why) into product features (What)
  3. 3. AGENDA • Recap • Value vs Cost • Minimize Cost: Story mapping • Q&A
  4. 4. RECAP What did you discover from the Customer Interviews? 5 m Unexpected answers/explanations?
  5. 5. VALUE VS COST
  6. 6. Value > Cost BEHAVIOR HAPPENS WHEN… Example: People waiting in line to get the new iPhone on the release day. What’s the value for them? What’s the cost?
  7. 7. TYPES OF VALUE/COST 1. Time / Effort Example: wait, do something 2. Reputation Example: tell your friends about this (endorsement) 3. Money Example: payment 4. Emotion Example: stress, peace of mind, enjoyment, anger LOWTOHIGH
  8. 8. VALUE/COST TRANSACTIONS VALUE COST Emotion, Time/effort Money Reputation Time/effort Time/effort Time/effort Emotion, Money Money Time/effort, Reputation, Money or Emotion?
  9. 9. ACTIVITY For your product: Identify the value and cost for your users. Discussion 1 m 123 4 m Use the 4 types of values (Time/effort, Reputation, Money and Emotion)
  10. 10. Optimize by making sure you address a real problem/pain Optimize by reducing the effort to address the problem/pain Usefulness Usability Value vs Cost IN PRODUCT
  11. 11. MINIMIZING THE COST
  12. 12. “HAPPY PATH” • The ideal path for a user to get to the value that a product offers; the shortest distance/lowest cost • Visualized as a linear user flow diagram: • Identify the core task to get to the value • Start with the start and end points • Only include user’s action • Only add necessary steps
  13. 13. EXAMPLE: UBER’S HAPPY PATH take out phone, open app set pick up, destination locations review estimate, order car (pay $) wait for car ride car arrive at destination Cost Value Ideal user journey for UberX passenger (not new user) Task: Ordering a car to ensure on-time arrival -time/effort : 1m -time/effort: 1m -time/effort: 1m -money: $25 +emotion: calm -time/effort: 3m +emotion: calm -time/effort: 20m +emotion: calm +time/effort: 15m early +emotion: calm Cost: 26m + $25 Value: calm emotion + 15m early
  14. 14. STORYMAPPING • A technique to identify the minimum set of features to deliver value to end-users • How to do it? 1. Identify core task based on the problem you’re solving for users 2. Map out “happy path” 3. List out features needed to allow users to complete the “happy path” 4. Prioritize features
  15. 15. EXAMPLE: UBER’S STORYMAP take out phone, open app set pick up, destination locations review estimate, order car (pay $) wait for car ride car arrive at destination List our features under each step splash screen get my current location show available cars near me search for address address book split fee get fare estimate manage payment info (cc) use promo code see car location contact driver cancel car share ETA tweet about trip review driver change destination change music review driver from last trip control AC/ heat HIGHNECESSITYLOWNECESSITY
  16. 16. EXAMPLE: UBER’S STORYMAP take out phone, open app set pick up, destination locations review estimate, order car (pay $) wait for car ride car arrive at destination splash screen get my current location show available cars near me search for address address book split fee get fare estimate manage payment info (cc) use promo code see car location contact driver cancel car share ETA tweet about trip review driver change destination change music review driver from last trip control AC/ heat Order the feature within each column based on necessity (top : high necessity) HIGHNECESSITYLOWNECESSITY
  17. 17. EXAMPLE: UBER’S STORYMAP take out phone, open app set pick up, destination locations review estimate, order car (pay $) wait for car ride car arrive at destination splash screen get my current location show available cars near me search for address address book split fee get fare estimate manage payment info (cc) use promo code see car location contact driver cancel car share ETA tweet about trip review driver change destination change music review driver from last trip control AC/ heat Identify the must-haves to allow end-user to get to the value HIGHNECESSITYLOWNECESSITY
  18. 18. OBJECTIVES By the end of this lesson you’ll be able to… • Describe the importance of value and cost in product development • Define the core task for your product • Translate value proposition (Why) into product features (What)
  19. 19. LAB EXERCISE • Prompt on Google Doc • Due: Tuesday, 8 Nov 2016 at 11:59pm • Lab: Thursday, 10 Nov 2016
  20. 20. Q&A dnystwn@gmail.com | @dsetia_1 Office hours link : bit.ly/DS-officehours
  21. 21. G R O W I T | W E E K 4 - C L A S S 2 P R O D U C TD A N N Y S E T I AWA N | 1 N O V 2 0 1 6
  22. 22. OBJECTIVES By the end of this lesson you’ll be able to… • Discover issues in your core task flow • Address those issues
  23. 23. QUANT AND QUAL Quantitative : 50,000 ft view of what’s happening Qualitative : Street view of the root cause of the issue
  24. 24. CONNECTING THE TWO 1. Quantitative : In your analytics, identify high-impact area (e.g. high drop-off) in your conversion funnel 2. Quantifiable Qualitative : Quickly verify problem with a survey (e.g. NPS) or customer feedback data 3. Qualitative : Conduct interviews/usability study to get to the root cause of the problem 4. Quantitative : Come up with a solution idea and test with limited number of users. See if the conversion rate increases
  25. 25. QUANTITATIVE INSIGHT
  26. 26. LOOK AT YOUR DATA Goal: To find out your users’ behavior (what they’re really doing) 1. Construct your funnel. Map out steps from your “happy path” to screen/ event 2. Collect baseline. Go to your analytics populate your funnel 3. Identify problematic points. Spot low conversion points. Features/screens before the low drop-off point is the part you need to work on
  27. 27. UBER EXAMPLE W/ CONVERSION take out phone, open app set pick up, destination locations review estimate, order car (pay $) wait for car ride car arrive at destination splash screen (100) pick up location set (95) destination location set (78) 95% 82% fare estimate / order screen (72) order confirmed (16) ride starts (14) ride ends (14) screen event 92% 85% 99% 22% Disclaimer: all data are fictional for illustration purposes only
  28. 28. WHAT HAPPENS BETWEEN THE CHECKPOINTS? fare estimate / order screen (72) order confirmed (16) 22% • Any broken feature ? i.e. sometimes button not responsive , estimate doesn’t appear • Cost too high? i.e. price, wait time • Missing information required to make decision ? i.e. driver’s picture • and more…
  29. 29. USABILITY STUDY
  30. 30. WHAT IS IT? Get real users to test a flow, so you can : • observe their interaction with the problematic area • ask questions to get a better idea of users’ mental model • discover how your users see the cost for completing the task (i.e. on seeing a long form, user may say “this will take me forever”) • discover use cases you’ve never thought of
  31. 31. BEST PRACTICES • Provide context and clearly defined task • Use a real build or realistic prototype • Seek reaction, not feedback • Ask user to think out loud. Probe when appropriate (“what happened there?”) • Test the test
  32. 32. HOW TO RECRUIT PARTICIPANTS • Same as user interviews • Professional recruiters • Tools that offer panels • Guerrilla recruiting (Buy coffee in exchange for testing) • Existing customers (and/or their contacts) • Friends and family (and their friends)
  33. 33. MINIMUM # OF PARTICIPANTS? • 5 is normally enough • “Statistically significant” not that significant to identify usability issues • 1:3 ratio of session length and analysis
  34. 34. QUESTIONS TO ASK • Open ended questions “Could you please describe what you can do here?” • Avoid leading question “How would you go back?” (when there’s a button labeled ”back”) • Probe when you see reaction “You seemed surprised. Why?” • Get them to describe the experience and expectation “What are we looking at here?” “What just happened?” “What do you expect to happen?”
  35. 35. DEMO 1 • 1 volunteer student as participant, screen sharing • Task : go to economist.com , find an article you find interesting and start reading • Remote testing with zoom
  36. 36. DEMO 2 • 1 volunteer student as interviewer • 1 volunteer student as participant, screen sharing • Task : core task for the product • Remote testing with zoom
  37. 37. THE SET UP : PRO Usability lab with a window (two-way mirror) to observation room Laptop recording a usability session
  38. 38. THE SET UP : DIY DIY rig : chip clip + rubber band + webcam Laptop hugging method Source: http://unmatchedstyle.com/news/usability-testing-on-mobile-devices.php
  39. 39. LAPTOP HUGGING DEMO Using Hangout On Air for the recording, broadcasting to remote team members
  40. 40. CHECKLIST • Load up your build/prototype on a test device • Prepare documents (e.g. NDA, recording consent) • Draft script based on the core task to test Download script template • Test the test
  41. 41. SESSION RECORDING TOOL • Observe what the users actually do • Useful to identify/validate usability issue • For web: Hotjar, ClickTale, CrazyEgg, MouseFlow • For Apps: Appsee • Example on next screen
  42. 42. ADDRESSING THE ISSUES
  43. 43. WHAT CAN YOU DO? Depending on the issues that you discover, here are things you can do to address them: • Change the flow • Add/remove/edit content • Change UI controls and/or interaction pattern • Add onboarding • Rework visual design
  44. 44. HOW TO PRIORITIZE ISSUES Use the MoSCoW method: • MUST HAVE : Critical, blocking users from completing task • SHOULD HAVE : Important, causing friction but not blocking users from completing task • COULD HAVE : Not necessary, but would improve customer satisfaction. Only if time and resources permit. • WON’T HAVE : Low ROI issues, no/low impact on customer satisfaction
  45. 45. OBJECTIVES By the end of this lesson you’ll be able to… • Discover issues in your core task flow • Address those issues
  46. 46. Q&A dnystwn@gmail.com | @dsetia_1 Office hours link : bit.ly/DS-officehours

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