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Non Traditional Partnerships to Create Healthy Communities - National Planning Conference 2018

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Partnerships between planners, public health professionals, and coalitions that promote sound urban planning and design are becoming essential to public health and education.

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Non Traditional Partnerships to Create Healthy Communities - National Planning Conference 2018

  1. 1. Non-traditional Partnerships to Create Healthy Communities Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP Hoyle Consulting American Planning Association National Planning Conference April 23, 2018
  2. 2. 17% of kids and teens are obese. Limited physical activity contributes to the obesity epidemic. Dedicated, safe space for bicycling and walking helps kids be active and gain independence. 3 Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  3. 3. Equity Enhancing the ability of underserved populations to travel by non-motorized modes can: ◦ Improve outcomes in health, safety, and economic development; ◦ Promote resource efficiency, e.g. reduce household transport costs; ◦ Strengthen neighborhood relations Slide adapted from: Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center
  4. 4. Urbana- Champaign, IL
  5. 5. Flat Terrain – Glaciation did leave moraines Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  6. 6. Moraines get warning signs! Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  7. 7. Champaign County, IL 208,419 residents in 2016 Close to 20% of Champaign County residents live in poverty 54% of children attending public schools were eligible for free or reduced price lunches 25% of Champaign Residents reported being obese, a drop from 27% in 2014 Leading cause of death in Champaign County from 2003 to 2014 was heart disease, in 2015 cancer surpassed heart disease
  8. 8. A Tale of Two Cities (Plus a University) From 1980 to 2000 U.S. Census showed declining rates of walking, bicycling and transit use in C-U. Community leaders decided to make a change and create a Micro-Urban Community
  9. 9. What is a Micro-Urban Community? A community of 250,000 or less with the desirable attributes of metropolitan centers such as: a vibrant arts/culture/nightlife scene, an internationally diverse population, a strong technology base, and an animated public discourse on major societal and global concerns, such as sustainability and the environment. http://www.micro-urbanist.com/index.html
  10. 10. Partnerships Champaign County Bikes 6,963 units of government in Illinois
  11. 11. Partnerships - Planning & Public Health
  12. 12. / 13 2001 MPO (CUUATS) begins LRTP & CUMTD adopts Strategic Plan 2004 CUMTD sponsors Safe Routes to School programs starting w/ International Walk ‘n Bike to School Day 2005 CUMTD sponsors Champaign County Bikes bicycle education, bicycle maps, & organizations 2008 First SRTS Grants awarded to City of Urbana and C- U SRTS Project & Champaign adopts Complete Streets Policy 2009 First communitywide Bike to Work event held 2010 Urbana becomes Bronze Level Bicycle Friendly Community 2012 Urbana adopts Complete Streets Policy 2013 Champaign become Bronze Level Bicycle Friendly Community 2014 MCORE $15.7 million TIGER grant awarded & Urbana becomes first GOLD Level Bicycle Friendly Community in IL 2017 Community IPLAN developed C-U Community Partnerships
  13. 13. Community Plans
  14. 14. Community Health Improvement Plan 2018- 2020
  15. 15. Illinois Project for Local Assessment of Needs (IPLAN) Elements of IPLAN are: 1. Organizational capacity assessment 2. Community health needs assessment 3. Community health plan, focusing on at least 3 priority health problems Mobilizing for Action through Planning & Partnerships includes: 1. Community Health Status Assessment 2. Community Themes & Strengths Assessment 3. Local Public Health System Assessment 4. Forces of Change Assessment
  16. 16. Local Public Health System Assessment Local Public Health System Assessment:  748 residents surveyed to get in- depth picture of community 84 community leaders  50 different agencies, including government, planners, public health, police, fire, nonprofits, emergency, & university  3 top priorities identified
  17. 17. Long Range Transportation Plan & MPO data useful to community health planners
  18. 18. IPLAN Community Health Assessment Community Survey
  19. 19. Create Mode Shift Provide people with choices: • Invest in bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure • Calm traffic • Create Safe Routes to School • Build Transit Supportive development • Retrofit sprawling neighborhoods • Revitalize walkable neighborhoods • Education and Encouragement Measuring the Health Effects of Sprawl; Barbara McCann and Reid Ewing; Smart Growth America and Surface Transportation Policy Project, 2003 Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  20. 20. 5. Tools for Transformation
  21. 21. Programs Complete Streets (Implemented) Safe Routes to School (Implemented) Bicycle Friendly America (Implemented) Vision Zero (TBA) Walk Friendly Communities (TBA)
  22. 22. Complete Streets policies defined: Complete Streets ensure that the entire right-of- way is planned, designed, constructed, operated, and maintained to provide safe access for all users. Both cities, University of Illinois, and MPO adopted policies. Pictures: City of Urbana
  23. 23. Two- to Four- lane Streets (Road Diets/Right-Sizing) FROM THIS…. TO THIS! Photo source: City of Urbana
  24. 24. •Improves walking and biking conditions •Reduces congestion •Increases physical activity (10 minutes to school and 10 minutes home=20 minutes of daily physical activity) •Cost savings for schools (reduce need for “hazard” busing) •Others:  Increase child’s sense of freedom Help establish lifetime habits Teach pedestrian and bicyclist skills SRTS Programs Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  25. 25. The 6 E’s Education Encouragement Enforcement Engineering Evaluation Equity Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  26. 26. “In God we trust, everyone else bring data.” NYC Mayor Bloomberg
  27. 27. Evaluation Collecting data is key! ◦ Parent surveys ◦ Travel tallies ◦ Walkability checklists ◦ Bikeability checklists ◦ Crash data
  28. 28. Equity Ask schools what they need – more outreach and support needed for lower income school population engagement Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  29. 29. National recognition for communities that actively work to support bicycling • 5 award levels o Bronze o Silver o Gold o Platinum o Diamond Bicycle Friendly Community Program of League of American Bicyclists Photo credit: Jennifer Selby
  30. 30. A Bicycle Friendly Community welcomes cyclists by providing safe accommodation for cycling and encouraging people to bike for transportation and recreation. Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  31. 31. Vision Zero is a strategy to eliminate all traffic fatalities and severe injuries, while increasing safe, healthy, equitable mobility for all. https://visionzeronetwork.org/ Picture: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  32. 32. Walk Friendly Communities http://walkfriendly.org/ Picture: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  33. 33. Results in C-U
  34. 34. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 2004 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Miles Year Bicycle Facilities in the Urbanized Area Shared-Use Path (sidepath, divided, off-street) Bike Path (includes UIUC Bike Path) Bike Lanes (on-street) Shared Lane Markings (sharrows) Shared Bike/Parking Lanes Bike Route
  35. 35. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 NumberofCrashes Year Historic Bike Crashes in Cities of Champaign, Urbana, and the Urbanized Area Champaign Urbana Urbanized Area
  36. 36. 80.00% 82.00% 84.00% 86.00% 88.00% 90.00% 92.00% 94.00% 96.00% 98.00% 100.00% 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Year Residential Parcels Within 1/4 Mile of CUMTD Weekday Routes Single Family Residential Multi Family Residential Total Residential
  37. 37. Sidewalks to transit
  38. 38. Affordable Housing Units w/in ¼ mile of bicycle facilities =2075 units Picture: City of Champaign
  39. 39. Urbana Trips to Work Increasingly Active Modes (U.S. Census/ACS) 54.3% 17.2% 5.0% 16.6% 0.4% 6.5% 38.8% 58.1% 14.8% 6.7% 14.2% 1.1% 5.1% 35.7% 0.0% 10.0% 20.0% 30.0% 40.0% 50.0% 60.0% 70.0% Car truck or van Walked Bicycle Public transportation- excluding taxi Taxicab, motorcycle, or other means Worked at home Active Transportation Total Percentage Mode City of Urbana Urbana 2007-2011 Urbana 2012-2016
  40. 40. 6. The Future Where do we go from here? Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  41. 41. It is All About the American Dream: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness Pictures: Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, Hoyle Consulting
  42. 42. Thank You! Cynthia Hoyle, FAICP, LCI Hoyle Consulting 2207 S. Cottage Grove Ave. Urbana, IL cynthia@cynthiahoyle.com http://www.cynthiahoyle.com/
  43. 43. Resources
  44. 44. Resources www.activelivingbydesign.org www.bikeleague.org/bfa www.planning.org https://www.880cities.org
  45. 45. Resources www.saferoutespartnership.org/home www.completestreets.org www.ite.org
  46. 46. Resources www.apha.org www.apbp.org

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