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Copyright education in the age of social media

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Workshop presented at the Social Media for Learning in Higher Education conference at Sheffield Hallam University on 18th December 2015

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Copyright education in the age of social media

  1. 1. Jane Secker and Chris Morrison 18th December 2015, Sheffield Hallam University http://ukcopyrightliteracy.wordpress.com https://ukcopyrightliteracy.wordpress.com @UKCopyrightLit Copyright education in the age of social media
  2. 2. COPYRIGHT !? GET ME OUT OF HERE Startled cat: https://flic.kr/p/5XpzSf
  3. 3. COPYRIGHT LITERACY SURVEY • Part of a wider European study: higher response rate in the UK (613 started, 417 complete responses) • LIS Professionals have higher confidence in the UK in terms of copyright literacy than elsewhere in Europe • UK institutions are more likely to have a dedicated Copyright Officer and an institutional policy. However this study doesn’t really examine what they do, whether makes a difference. • Lack of confidence in areas where the law has changed, or surrounding new technologies and use of social media
  4. 4. EDUCATION & CPD: WHAT SHOULD IT COVER? General copyright awareness / copyright duration/ using images /fair dealing and quotation / digital content rights / creative commons / understanding terms & conditions & re- use licenses / implications of non-compliance (but in a good way using carrot not stick)…. Whatever it is it needs to be clear and as jargon free as possible to stop people glazing over.
  5. 5. EDUCATION & CDP: WHAT SHOULD IT COVER? General copyright awareness / copyright duration/ using images /fair dealing and quotation / digital content rights / creative commons / understanding terms & conditions & re- use licenses / implications of non-compliance (but in a good way using carrot not stick)…. Whatever it is it needs to be clear and as jargon free as possible to stop people glazing over.
  6. 6. FEEL THE FEAR I think copyright can seem daunting if you are not familiar with it, and by encouraging an awareness at an early stage, this would reduce any anxieties to follow. I find that people are often scared of copyright…
  7. 7. FOCUS ON POSITIVES Copyright education should: …reflect the fact that most LIS practitioners have significant exemptions and freedoms as regards copyright. Much existing copyright education is effectively written from a commercial rightsholder perspective and tends to be unduly dogmatic as a result.
  8. 8. LET’S MAKE COPYRIGHT FUN
  9. 9. INTRODUCTIONS • Decide on your team name • Give me your team name for the score sheet
  10. 10. SOCIAL MEDIA AND COPYRIGHT Social media Copyright
  11. 11. SOCIAL MEDIA AND COPYRIGHT creative, restrictive, empowering, fun, exciting, innovative, enabling, expressive, dynamic, fixed, fluid, boring, out-dated, evolving, static, liberating, relevant, irrelevant, collaborative, individual, rewarding, free, frustrating, scary, complicated, open, protecting, nurturing
  12. 12. COPYRIGHT: THE CARD GAME The aims: To explore copyright 1) Works * 2) Usages * 3) Licences 4) Exceptions
  13. 13. THE GAME: RULES Each round will focus on one ‘suit’ Each team will have one deck of cards Each team must nominate a card handler Answers to the scenarios are given by placing your cards on the table Teams will be given the opportunity to confer and agree answers
  14. 14. WORKS
  15. 15. WHY CONSIDER TYPES OF COPYRIGHT WORK? Different durations Different layers of rights Different owners within content Different licences Some exceptions work specific
  16. 16. COPYRIGHT WORKS (1) Literary Artistic Musical Dramatic Broadcast Sound Recording Film
  17. 17. COPYRIGHT WORKS (2) Typography Public Domain Database Moral Rights Performance Non-Qualifying
  18. 18. THE GAME: ROUND 1 Use your “Work” cards to identify what types of works are in the following: 1. A tweet 2. A blog post 3. A photo on Pinterest 4. A photo on Facebook
  19. 19. USAGES
  20. 20. WHY CONSIDER TYPES OF COPYRIGHT USAGE? They are the CDPA ‘restricted acts’ as defined in law The ‘restricted acts’ must be ‘mapped’ onto any activity to understand licences and exceptions available
  21. 21. COPYRIGHT USAGES Copying Issuing copies to the public Renting or lending to the public Performing, showing or playing in public Communication to the public Adaptation FOR RENT
  22. 22. THE GAME: ROUND 2 Using your “Usage” cards, decide what types of usage apply in the following four scenarios.
  23. 23. THE GAME: ROUND 2 What types of usages apply? 1. A colleague at another university retweets your tweet which includes a photo of the outside of the British Library FOR RENT Copying Communication to the public
  24. 24. THE GAME: ROUND 2 What types of usages apply? 2. You Photoshop a picture of Mary Berry and Paul Hollywood to include your work colleagues and share on Facebook FOR RENT Adaptation Communication to the public Copying
  25. 25. THE GAME: ROUND 2 What types of usages apply? 3. A blogger uploads a picture to his blog FOR RENT Copying Communication to the public
  26. 26. THE GAME: ROUND 2 What types of usages apply? 4. An academic bookmarks a link to a government report on the internet in their delicious library which is public FOR RENT Communication to the public?
  27. 27. FINAL GAME! • Social media presents many interesting copyright challenges • Licences (or terms of use) govern much of what you can and can’t do on social media websites • When is ‘sharing’ not sharing – how social media changes our understanding of rules and cultural practices • Laws vs social (media) norms Now let’s find out how much you know about copyright and social media sites!
  28. 28. JANE AND CHRIS’S 3 TOP TIPS 1. Think about the value of the content you want to use (to you and to the person who owns it) 2. Then consider licences / terms of use for social media sites 3. You will always need to make a risk assessment! (0-5)
  29. 29. CREDITS These slides and accompanying cards are (apart from any images contained within) © Chris Morrison and Jane Secker (@UKCopyrightLit) 2015 and are available for reuse under a Creative Commons Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share Alike 4.0 licence. UK Copyright Literacy: http://ukcopyrightliteracy.wordpress.com Chris’s blog https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/copyrightliteracykent/ Jane’s blog: https://janesecker.wordpress.com Clip Art icons are from openclipart.org
  30. 30. FURTHER READING Websites • Copyight, Designs and Patents Act 1988 • Unofficial Consolidation of CDPA 1988 • Library and Archives Copyright Alliance • Copyright Hub • Copyrightuser.org Reading Bailey, J. (2008, 5 May) Copyright and Twitter, the Blog Herald, www.blogherald.com/2008/05/05/copyright-and-twitter [accessed 8 January 2010]. Google (2015b) Google Public Policy Blog, A Step Toward Protecting Fair Use on YouTube, http://googlepublicpolicy.blogspot.co.uk/2015/11/a-step-toward-protecting-fair-use-on.html [accessed 11 December 2015] The Guardian (2015) YouTube 'dancing baby' case prompts fair use ruling on copyrighted videos,http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/sep/15/youtube-dancing-baby-copyright- videos [accessed 1 December 2015] Jisc (2015c) Pinterest, image sharing websites and the law,https://www.jisc.ac.uk/guides/pinterest-image-sharing-websites-and-the-law [accessed 8 December 2015] Oppenheim, C (2012) No Nonsense Guide to Legal Issues in Web 2.0 and Cloud Computing, Facet Publishing. Secker, J with Morrison, C. (2016) Copyright and E-learning: a guide for practitioners. Facet Publishing (forthcoming) UCISA (2015) Social Media Toolkit. Available at: http://www.ucisa.ac.uk/groups/exec/socialmedia.aspx [accessed 11 December 2015]

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