Copenhagen Presentation

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A presentation on the background and values of knowledge ecologies for international security professionals

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Copenhagen Presentation

  1. 1. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Sean S. Costigan </li></ul><ul><li>Visiting Fellow </li></ul><ul><li>Institute of Foreign Policy Studies </li></ul><ul><li>University of Calcutta </li></ul>
  2. 2. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Defining Our Subject </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge ecologies can be seen as a discourse that takes place within a physical or virtual institution consisting of a diversity of interdependent and interconnected technologies, processes, entities, strategies, tools, methodologies and communities that adapt to changing circumstances </li></ul>
  3. 3. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Drivers </li></ul><ul><li>Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Language and Understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Societal Context </li></ul>
  4. 4. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Drivers </li></ul><ul><li>The Virtues of Openness </li></ul>
  5. 5. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Drivers </li></ul><ul><li>The Convergence of Work and Learning </li></ul><ul><li>Changing Work Patterns </li></ul><ul><li>The Culture of Knowing </li></ul>
  6. 6. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Drivers </li></ul><ul><li>Shifting Lines of Power and Authority </li></ul>
  7. 7. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Ecologies as the Evolution of Knowledge Management </li></ul><ul><li>KM remains a powerful enabler of organizational efficiency and effectiveness, but it is necessary to move beyond technological frameworks designed around predictive rules of engagement to complex adaptive systems engineered to anticipate surprise </li></ul>
  8. 8. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Knowledge Ecologies in Practice </li></ul><ul><li>A number of international affairs-related websites can be identified as emerging knowledge ecologies. While they may have started life as static web services, they are beginning to demonstrate many of the macro-elements noted above. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>A Core Challenge: Can Knowledge Ecologies Help Mitigate or Avert Disaster? </li></ul>Can that goal be met if the complex connections and dependencies of the issues involved are revealed and if there is a social network to connect isolated areas of expertise and knowledge in order to fully understand and visualize the problems and consequences to leaders and policy makers?
  10. 10. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Contrasting with Tradition </li></ul>The mitigation or averting of disaster if the complex connections and dependencies of the issues involved can be revealed and if there is a social network to connect isolated areas of expertise and knowledge in order to fully understand and visualize the problems and consequences to leaders and policy makers.
  11. 11. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Planning for Change: Three Phases </li></ul><ul><li>Random Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Selection and Growth Phase </li></ul><ul><li>Emergent or organization and amplification phase </li></ul>
  12. 12. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Improving Outcomes: An Ecosystems Approach </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals are limited in what they know </li></ul><ul><li>All ideas and contributors are not equal </li></ul><ul><li>Contributors have role specific blinders </li></ul>
  13. 13. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Improving Outcomes: An Ecosystems Approach </li></ul><ul><li>All individual have biases </li></ul><ul><li>A systems perspective is missing. </li></ul><ul><li>Individuals are influenced by their experience. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Knowledge Ecologies and International Security <ul><li>Improving Outcomes: An Ecosystems Approach </li></ul><ul><li>Increasing fragmentation leads to knowledge gaps </li></ul><ul><li>Intentional deceit produces flawed analyses. </li></ul>

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