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Note-Taking
Goals of Note-Taking
• Saves time from re-reading
• Summarizes important points for later review
and study
• Ensures focus...
Quote, Paraphrase, Summarize, and
Plagiarizing
• Quote – exact word for word statement from a
source placed between quotat...
TIPS
• Make notes in your own words because they
reflect your own thinking and understanding of
given material
• Use direc...
Notes from a Textbook
• Title each page of your notes with the chapter or
section title
• Date and number each page for ea...
Notes from a Textbook cont.
• Annotate in the margins of your textbook (you can
still “buy back” your textbook if you do t...
Notes from Textbook cont.
• Don’t write verbatim notes (e.g. everything is
a direct quote), instead summarize what you
hav...
Preparing for a Lecture
• Use your syllabus to prepare for a lecture
– Read ahead for the next scheduled class date
– Writ...
The Lecture
• Many factors come into play during a lecture*
– Class discussions
– Your own internal thoughts
– References ...
After the Lecture
• If practical, review notes after class while the
information is still fresh, e.g. within 24 hours
(sho...
Writing a Paper
(using your notes)
• Critical thinking techniques:
– What is your opinion of the assignment’s material?
– ...
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Note taking

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Learn the importance of note-taking

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Note taking

  1. 1. Note-Taking
  2. 2. Goals of Note-Taking • Saves time from re-reading • Summarizes important points for later review and study • Ensures focus during lectures • Keeps ideas organized • A process of understanding • Works on different aspects of memory: – Summarizing aids long-term memory – writing notes taps into your motor skills – Drawing relevant charts or diagrams helps visual memory
  3. 3. Quote, Paraphrase, Summarize, and Plagiarizing • Quote – exact word for word statement from a source placed between quotation marks • *Paraphrase – re-writing a resource in your own words (2-4 sentences) without changing its meaning • Summarize – getting the main idea from a source and compressing it into one sentence; a general support of an assertion • Plagiarizing –to take and use another’s thoughts, writings, or inventions as one’s own
  4. 4. TIPS • Make notes in your own words because they reflect your own thinking and understanding of given material • Use direct quotes only when important facts and expert knowledge or opinions are necessary • Personal reactions/thoughts or other comments can be circled or written in a different color to distinguish them from the main subject at hand
  5. 5. Notes from a Textbook • Title each page of your notes with the chapter or section title • Date and number each page for easy reference • Skim before reading – Read the introduction, headings, subheadings, and summary to get an overall idea of what the selected text will be about • Outline main ideas • Look for key words
  6. 6. Notes from a Textbook cont. • Annotate in the margins of your textbook (you can still “buy back” your textbook if you do this) – Write questions, comments, thoughts, etc. • Be selective on highlighting – Highlight key words (not sentences), such as “in conclusion”; “this important fact”; “the goal of…” – Move highlighted words to your notes • Define words you are not familiar with • After each selection of written notes always, regardless of quotes or paraphrasing, write the page number at the end of each thought
  7. 7. Notes from Textbook cont. • Don’t write verbatim notes (e.g. everything is a direct quote), instead summarize what you have read—this ensures understanding and comprehension • Place quotation marks for direct quotes abstracted from the text
  8. 8. Preparing for a Lecture • Use your syllabus to prepare for a lecture – Read ahead for the next scheduled class date – Write down any questions, comments, or suggestions about the reading or homework • Review notes from previous lectures • Prepare your paper (for notes) before you arrive at class, e.g. date, number, title, class, etc.
  9. 9. The Lecture • Many factors come into play during a lecture* – Class discussions – Your own internal thoughts – References to the textbook – The instructor’s lecture • Any repetitional phrases from the professor or his/her reference to another student’s comment is a key indicator that the information is important (write it in your notes) • If the professor poses questions, answer them in your head (or out loud) – If you get it wrong or have a different answer than a classmate’s write a comment in your notes that clarifies and/or supports the discussion
  10. 10. After the Lecture • If practical, review notes after class while the information is still fresh, e.g. within 24 hours (short-term memory fades quick) • Review for understanding—if anything stands out that you do not understand, ask a classmate or professor for clarification • Compare your notes with classmates to fill in gaps and share how others understood the materials – Is it different from what you understood? – How can you make your notes clearer? (if needed)
  11. 11. Writing a Paper (using your notes) • Critical thinking techniques: – What is your opinion of the assignment’s material? – Is your opinion supported or disputed? – Are there alternative explanations? – How does the class material relate to the subject? – Do you have any personal experiences that relate to the subject? – Have I provided a different perspective?

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