Weiss in Singapore on Mobile 2.0 & UX Trends 2009

1,225 views

Published on

Scott Weiss presented on the future of mobile web browsing and applications, from a 2009 perspective. This talk was sponsored by Human Factors International and NCS in Singapore in March, 2009.

Published in: Design, Technology, Business

Weiss in Singapore on Mobile 2.0 & UX Trends 2009

  1. 1. Introduction to Mobile 2.0 and Handset UX Trends: 2009-2010 Prepared for: NCS Public Presentation 23 March 2009 Prepared by: Scott Weiss, Executive Director
  2. 2. 2 Not Mobile 2.0
  3. 3. 3 Not Mobile 2.0
  4. 4. 4 Not Mobile 2.0
  5. 5. 5 Not Mobile 2.0
  6. 6. 6 Not Mobile 2.0
  7. 7. 7 Not Mobile 2.0
  8. 8. 8 Mobile 2.0 Social Components   Networking   Chat, instant messaging, commenting...   Uploading photos and text (user-generated content)   Presence Localised Content   Awareness of place   Sharing of place content AJAX   Highly interactive widgets   Animation   Exact placement of graphics & widgets   “Same page” UI (rather than lots of round-trips)
  9. 9. 9 Usability Ease of use By design   Know your user   Iterate designs before coding them By research   Ask users what they like and do not like about your concept   Prototype the concept   Ask users to do things with the prototype   Observe their struggle and iterate the designs
  10. 10. 10 Mobile + Social Networking = ? Benefits Challenges Location-Awareness Privacy Camera Availability Low Photo Quality Constant Availability Input Awkwardness Frequent Access Short Access Times
  11. 11. 11 Mobile Products in the Market Nokia’s Ovi Google’s Dodgeball Facebook Mobile   Mobile web, SMS, and photo upload features MySpace Gypsii   gypsii.com/m   Windows Mobile, Blackberry, and S60-based location-aware social networking BuzzCity’s MyGamma   http://mygamma.com/   WAP-enabled mobile social networking
  12. 12. 12 Mobile Facebook Three UI’s available:   Mobile application (native)   Mobile web site   Full web site, adapted to mobile Mobile (native): Mobile Web: Desktop Adapted: • Attractive/clean • Straightforward, sloppy • Messy, with high graphics • Out of date with Facebook • Fewer features than desktop • Most desktop features account site • Full advertising • No stickiness • No advertising
  13. 13. 13 Mobile Facebook Three UI’s available:   Mobile application (native)   Mobile web site   Full web site, adapted to mobile Mobile (native): Mobile Web: Desktop Adapted: • Attractive/clean • Straightforward, sloppy • Messy, with high graphics • Out of date with Facebook • Fewer features than desktop • Most desktop features account site • Full advertising • No stickiness • No advertising
  14. 14. 14 Mobile Facebook Three UI’s available:   Mobile application (native)   Mobile web site   Full web site, adapted to mobile Mobile (native): Mobile Web: Desktop Adapted: • Attractive/clean • Straightforward, sloppy • Messy, with high graphics • Out of date with Facebook • Fewer features than desktop • Most desktop features account site • Full advertising • No stickiness • No advertising
  15. 15. 15 Gypsii   Downloaded the link to my Blackberry   Couldn’t log in... Gypsii: Sign In Gypsii: Surf Around
  16. 16. 16 MyGamma   Signup was straightforward   First step was to text ‘GAMMA’ to 82772   Got the link, went to the web site.   The video tells the rest... Sign
Up
 Content
Sample

  17. 17. Mobile Social 2.0 Tips Focus on the user experience first   What do mobile users want from a social networking product?   How will their use differ from their desktop use?   Design the mobile site   And test it thoroughly! Then think about monetisation
  18. 18. Localised Content and Usability Allow
user‐entry
of
city,
 neighborhood,
ZIP
code,
 intersec8on,
or
selec8on
from
a
 map…
Or
even
by
landmark
 Relying
on
today’s
slow
and
 unreliable
GPS
can
be
 frustra8ng
for
the
user
 Some8mes
people
want
to
 localise
where
they
are
going
 rather
than
where
they
are

  19. 19. 19 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  20. 20. 20 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  21. 21. 21 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  22. 22. 22 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  23. 23. 23 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  24. 24. 24 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  25. 25. 25 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  26. 26. 26 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  27. 27. 27 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  28. 28. 28 A Particularly Good Example: AroundMe
  29. 29. AJAX and Usability Wizzy
graphics
 and
anima8on
 can
hide
 deeper
 usability
 weaknesses

  30. 30. Pinch & Stretch Nightmare
  31. 31. Inconsistent UI “Back button” functionality inconsistently available Contact editibility only occasionally available Moving from section to section awkward
  32. 32. 32 WebKit http://webkit.org/ Used as the browser foundation by Safari, Nokia, Android... Open Source application framework upon which a browser can be built An open source project run by Apple Components   WebCore   JavaScriptCore   Drosera   SunSpider
  33. 33. 33 The WURFL: Wireless Universal Resource File http://wurfl.sourceforge.net/ XML configuration file that contains information about capabilities and features of many mobile devices Device data repository about mobile phones Open source, free, and voluntary Accessed by API at run time Fosters community among developers Luca
Passani

  34. 34. 34 dotMobi Mobile domain to support XHTML sites that conform to the .mobi standard At its heart, a marketing campaign, but one oriented toward quality user experience and brand trust Provide tools and services to enable best-in-class usability:   Emulator tool at http://mltd.mobi/emulator.php   Page and site test tools at http://ready.mobi   mobiForge developer community at http://mobiforge.com   Best practices: http://mobithinking.com/sites/mobithinking.com/files/dotMobi_Mobile_Usability_Best_Practice.pdf   Site builder tool at http://site.mobi   Device Atlas at http://deviceatlas.com –  Database of mobile device information –  Accessed via API at run time
  35. 35. 35 Touch •  2008 was the year of the bad touch screen phone. •  2009 is the year of the iPhone knockoff... from everyone. •  But there will be more bad touch screens.
  36. 36. 36 The Return of the QWERTY Keypad •  As consumers get tired of bad touch screens, QWERTY phones will pick up demand. •  However, it remains to be seen whether touch+QWERTY will be the winning combination...
  37. 37. 37 Touch Screen, Track Ball, & Joystick •  Allow one-handed single-mode use to place or answer a call. •  That means, only with the touch screen or only with the track ball, or only with the joystick (or 5-way pad)—to answer and place a call.
  38. 38. 38 Animation & Sexy Graphics •  The iPhone and competitors use sexy transitions and animations to cover up an underlying inconsistent and awkward UI. •  Delete buttons are all over the place. •  Back functionality is inconsistent (sometimes at upper left, otherwise not available). •  Sometimes things zoom left and right, other times they zoom up and down. •  Sometimes things just require too many strokes to complete.
  39. 39. 39 Bigger, Better Cameras •  5-megapixel standard, 8-megapixel not unusual •  Autofocus •  Zoom •  However, it’s just too hard to transfer photos to a computer or via MMS (or email)—exceptions noted!
  40. 40. 40 Hiding the Underlying OS •  Popular press criticise HTC handsets for not hiding Windows Mobile enough... •  What about Android? •  What about LiMo? •  What about S60?
  41. 41. 41 Application Stores •  Apple pioneered the mobile-accessed application store. •  Google’s Android and RIM’s Blackberry are also offering stores. •  Microsoft purported to be working on an application store. •  Qualcomm’s BREW has had a hard-to-use store for a number of years. •  Nokia, Nextel, and others have missed this opportunity.
  42. 42. 42 The End of Pink Phones We can all breathe a sigh of relief.
  43. 43. 43 Music, Finally Well-Done •  Music stores on the phones are a promising user experience opportunity. •  Standard headphone jacks are smart—and they should be on the top of the phone, not the left, right, or bottom! •  Side loading is the user experience worth considering: it’s a nightmare in Windows Mobile, a breeze on the iPhone, but what about S60 and other OS’s?
  44. 44. 44 Mapping & Location Awareness to a New Level •  Presence, direction, speed, all coming to phones in 2009. •  Google Maps leads in usability for base mapping applications. •  Navigation applications are a different story.
  45. 45. 45 HFI’s Global Offices Chicago
 Headquarters

 San
Francisco
 8700
W.
Bryn
Mawr
Avenue
 410
West
Lowe
 425
Market
Street
 Suite
800
South

 Fairfield,
IA
52556

 Suite
2200
 Chicago,
IL
60631‐3507
 Phone:
(800)
242‐4480
 San
Francisco,
CA
94105
 Phone:
(773)
714‐2362
 (641)
472‐4480

 Phone:
(415)
955‐2734
 Fax:
(773)
714‐4910
 Fax:
(641)
472‐5412
 Minneapolis
 Boston
 8400
Normandale
Lake
Blvd,
Suite
920
 1050
Waltham
Street,

 Minneapolis,
MN
55437
 Suite
410
Lexington,
MA
02421
 Phone:
(952)
820‐4442
 Phone:
(781)
860‐7200

 Fax:
(952)
921‐2306
 Fax:
(781)
860‐7979
 New
York
 Bal8more
 One
Penn
Plaza

 930
South
Wolfe
Street
 36th
Floor

 BalOmore
MD
21231
 New
York,
NY
10119
 Phone:
(410)
327‐1012
/
1013
 Phone:
(212)
835‐1699

 Fax
:
(410)
327‐1014

 Thank You! Usable.
Experience.
Design.
 London,
UK
 Mumbai,
India
 Pondicherry,
India
 Unit
7,
SrishO
Plaza,

 16
Albemarle
Street
 No.184,
Mission
Street
 London
W1S
4HW
 Next
to
Killick
Nixxon,
 Puducherry
605001
 Off
Saki‐Vihar
Road,
Andheri
(E),
 Phone:
+44
(0)207
290
3430
 Phone:
+
91
413
4210583
 Fax:
+44
(0)207
491
4118
 Mumbai

400072
 Fax:
+
91
413
4210586
 Phone:
91
(22)
4017
0400
 Fax:
91
(22)
2847
5554
 China
 Bangalore,
India
 Singapore
 407,
No.
555,
Nanjing
Road
West

 310/6
HR
Complex,
2nd
Floor

 51
Tras
Street,
#03‐01
 Koramangala,
5th
Block
 Shanghai,
China
200041
 Singapore,
078990
 Phone:
+86‐21‐5213
2046
 Bangalore
560
095
 Phone:
+65
6220
6431
 Tel:
+91
(80)
4150
7221/22/23
 Fax:
+86‐21‐5213
2062
 Fax:
+65
6220
6436

 Fax:
+91
(80)
4150
7220


×