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Week5 partii.pdf

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Week5 partii.pdf

  1. 1. Technology  Produc5vity  Tools  •  Students  use    Students  use    •technology   produc5vity  tools  to  tools  to   collaborate  in  enhance   construc5ng  learning,   technology-­‐enhanced  increase   models,  prepare  produc5vity,   publica5ons,  and  and  promote   produce  other  crea5ve  crea5vity.   works  (SCS  Tech  Plan,   2010-­‐2014,  p.  58).  
  2. 2. •  Students       Technology  Communica5ons  Tools  use  a  variety    •  Students     nd  of  media  ause  tele-­‐ to  formats  communica5ons  communicate  to  collaborate,  informa5on  and  publish,  and  ideas  effec5vely  to  interact  with  mul5ple  audiences  peers,  experts,  (SCS  Tech  Plan,  and  other  2010-­‐2014,  audiences.   p.  57).  
  3. 3.   Technology  research  tools  •  Students  use   •  Students  use  evaluate  and  technology  to  locate,   technology  n  the   .  .  .  based  o tools  select  new  evaluate,  and  collect   to  process  data   appropriateness  informa5on,  informa5on  from  a   and  report  the   .   for  specific   asksresources,   ources  variety  of  sand   results.  technological  (SCS  Tech  Plan,  informa5on  .  .  .  2010-­‐2014,  p.  7).  
  4. 4.  
  5. 5. Where  does  SCS  need  to  go,  in  order  to  align  the  SCS   technology  plan  with  the  na8onal  plan?   Specific  examples  of  individual  and  collabora8ve   learning  with  technology  include  the  following:  •  Inquiry  and  adventure  environments  with  games  and   ac8vi8es  that  foster  learning.  •  Online  “collaboratories”  (Na8onal  Science  Founda8on   2008a)  in  which  scien8sts  establish  protocols  for   collec8ng  data  with  sensors  from  local  environments   across  the  planet.  Learners  and  teachers  learn  science   by  doing  science  as  they  capture,  upload,  and  then   visualize  and  analyze  geospa8al  and  temporal  data   paPerns  from  the  data  contributed  by  the  globally   networked  community  (etcjournal.com,  n.d.,  p.  18).  
  6. 6. •  Earth-­‐  and  sky-­‐mapping  Web  resources  with  data  from  the  sciences  and   other  fields  of  scholarly  inquiry  that  anyone  can  use  to  develop  virtual   travel  tours  to  be  applied  in  learning  and  teaching  ac8vi8es.  •  Augmented  reality  plaWorms  and  games  that  bring  locally  relevant   learning  resources  into  view  for  users  of  mobile  devices  with  a  GPS   (Johnson,  et  al.  2010).  •  Use  of  the  power  of  collec8ve  intelligence  and  crowd-­‐sourcing  to  tackle   complex  interdisciplinary  problems.  •  Powerful  learning  applica8ons  for  mobile  Internet  access  devices,  such   as  musical  instrument  simulators,  language-­‐learning  tools,  and   mathema8cal  games.  •  Sites  and  communi8es  that  publish  academic  content,  including  user-­‐ generated  content.  One  notable  example  is  the  videotaped  lectures  of   MIT  physics  professor  Walter  Lewin,  available  on  MIT’s  Open  Course   Ware  site  as  well  as  through  commercial  courseware  and  video-­‐sharing   sites.  Lewin’s  engaging  and  entertaining  lectures  have  earned  him  a   following  of  millions  worldwide  (etcjournal.com,  n.d.,  p.  18).  
  7. 7. References  •  Etcjournal.com.  (n.d.)  A  Glimpse  at  the  2010  Na1onal  Educa1on   Technology  Plan.  Retrieved  on  May  15,  2011,  from               hPp://etcjournal.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/netp2010.pdf  •  Iste.net.  (n.d.)  Essen1al  condi1ons:  Necessary  condi1ons  to  effec1vely   leverage  technology  for  learning.  Interna8onal  Society  for  Technology  in   Educa8on.  Retrieved  on  May  15,  2011,  from   hPp://www.iste.org/standards/nets-­‐for-­‐students/nets-­‐for-­‐students-­‐essen8al-­‐condi8ons.aspx  •  Johnson,  L.,  A.  Levine,  R.  Smith,  and  S.  Stone.  2010.  The  2010  horizon   report.  Aus1n,  TX:  The  New  Media  Consor1um.    •  Na8onal  Science  Founda8on.  2008a.  Beyond  being  there:  A  blueprint  for   advancing  the  design,  development,  and  evalua1on  of  virtual   organiza1ons.  Final  report  from  Workshops  on  Building  Virtual   Organiza1ons.  Arlington,  VA:  NSF.  •  Shelby  County  Schools  Technology  Plan  (2011-­‐2014).    Retrieved  from   hPp://www.scsk12.org/SCS/departments/Instruc8onal-­‐Technology.html  
  8. 8. References  •  Etcjournal.com.  (n.d.)  A  Glimpse  at  the  2010  Na1onal  Educa1on   Technology  Plan.  Retrieved  on  May  15,  2011,  from   hPp://etcjournal.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/netp2010.pdf  •  Iste.net.  (n.d.)  Essen1al  condi1ons:  Necessary  condi1ons  to  effec1vely   leverage  technology  for  learning.  Interna8onal  Society  for  Technology  in   Educa8on.  Retrieved  on  May  15,  2011,  from   hPp://www.iste.org/standards/nets-­‐for-­‐students/nets-­‐for-­‐students-­‐essen8al-­‐condi8ons.aspx  •  Johnson,  L.,  A.  Levine,  R.  Smith,  and  S.  Stone.  2010.  The  2010  horizon   report.  Aus1n,  TX:  The  New  Media  Consor1um.    •  Na8onal  Science  Founda8on.  2008a.  Beyond  being  there:  A  blueprint  for   advancing  the  design,  development,  and  evalua1on  of  virtual   organiza1ons.  Final  report  from  Workshops  on  Building  Virtual   Organiza1ons.  Arlington,  VA:  NSF.  •  Shelby  County  Schools  Technology  Plan  (2011-­‐2014).    Retrieved  from   hPp://www.scsk12.org/SCS/departments/Instruc8onal-­‐Technology.html  

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