Mexican Migrants Power Point

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Mexican Migrants Power Point

  1. 1. Susan D.B. MuñizGRG 3334 Advanced GIS April 26, 2011
  2. 2.  Typical Mexican Migrant Male Uneducated Under-Skilled Rural Area Western States
  3. 3.  Null Hypothesis=Mexican migrants are the traditional stereotype-uneducated, under skilled males from the rural areas of western Mexico Alternate Hypothesis=Mexican migrants are not the stereotype-better educated, more skilled, more females from urban areas of non-traditional states
  4. 4.  Study Area: Mexico Data: US Census US Customs and Immigration Services Mexican Migration Project
  5. 5.  Downloaded files from: http://opr.princeton.edu http://census.gov http://diva-gis.org/datadown http://www.uscis.gov/files/nativedocuments/M- 708.pdf
  6. 6.  Extracted files from diva.gis for the Mexico boundary and state boundary files Created maps showing traditional and new sending states Opened Mexican Migration Project files in SPSS Deleted variables I did not need Copied SPSS information into Excel Set up various spreadsheets for: male/female %, education, sending states and occupation in Mexico and the US
  7. 7.  Created geodatabase and exported spreadsheets into the geodatabase Joined spreadsheets to Mexico state boundary attribute table Created maps showing sending states for each ten year increment Created tables showing male/female percentages, education percentages and occupation for Mexico and the US percentages Urban/Rural information from MMP was unusable
  8. 8.  More women migrating to the US Males and females better educated More non-traditional states sending migrants Increase in skilled laborers, decrease in agricultural and unskilled laborers
  9. 9.  1906-1949 Traditional States 93% 1906-1949 Non-Traditional States 7% 2000-2008 Traditional States 33% 2000-2008 Non-Traditional States 67%
  10. 10.  1906-1949 1950-1959 1960-1969 1970-1979 1980-1989 1990-1999 2000-2008 Aguascalientes 1.220% 1.173% 0.940% 0.804% 2.137% 3.389% 0.067% Colima 0.003% 1.142% 0.700% 2.227% 2.383% 2.369% 0.067% Durango 1.220% 3.520% 3.009% 3.177% 3.752% 7.287% 0.806% Guanajuato 17.863% 13.800% 11.787% 14.109% 14.587% 10.400% 4.600% Jalisco 21.984% 22.400% 21.630% 21.400% 18.901% 11.861% 17.742% Michoacán 22.290% 17.127% 19.561% 19.905% 15.200% 4.600% 8.737% Nayarit 0.458% 2.188% 2.760% 4.043% 3.684% 0.971% 0.000% San Luis Potosí 9.618% 9.134% 7.461% 7.446% 9.122% 10.910% 1.210% Zacatecas 18.473% 17.317% 18.182% 16.007% 11.533% 6.975% 0.000% Total 93.129% 87.801% 86.030% 89.118% 81.299% 58.762% 33.229%Source: Mexican Migration Project http://opr.princeton.edu
  11. 11. Percentage of Migrants from Non-Traditional States 1906-1949 1950-1959 1960-1969 1970-1979 1980-1989 1990-1999 2000-2008Baja California 0.000% 0.381% 2.260% 1.733% 1.500% 1.579% 0.000%Baja California Sur 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.014% 0.000% 0.000%Campeche 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.021% 0.014% 0.016% 0.000%Coahuila 0.000% 0.476% 0.251% 0.124% 0.164% 0.115% 0.067%Chiapas 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.014% 0.049% 0.067%Chihuahua 1.070% 2.284% 2.132% 1.114% 2.315% 4.606% 1.882%Distrito Federal 0.153% 0.286% 0.752% 0.846% 1.520% 1.661% 1.411%Guerrero 1.527% 1.272% 1.820% 2.000% 3.054% 3.455% 0.336%Hidalgo 0.310% 0.190% 0.188% 0.062% 0.411% 2.155% 3.696%México 0.000% 1.142% 0.564% 0.743% 1.600% 4.211% 10.820%Morelos 0.305% 0.666% 0.564% 0.310% 1.150% 3.093% 8.804%Nuevo León 1.680% 0.856% 1.130% 0.454% 0.657% 1.678% 1.008%Oaxaca 0.458% 1.332% 0.440% 0.268% 1.950% 2.800% 0.202%Puebla 0.000% 0.000% 0.125% 0.250% 1.137% 3.010% 0.336%Querétaro 0.153% 0.190% 0.063% 0.083% 0.082% 0.082% 0.000%Quintana Roo 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.021% 0.000% 0.000% 0.000%Sinaloa 0.305% 1.332% 1.320% 1.774% 1.466% 1.875% 0.000%Sonora 0.000% 0.285% 0.502% 0.300% 0.178% 0.082% 0.000%Tabasco 0.000% 0.000% 0.000% 0.021% 0.014% 0.016% 0.000%Tamaulipas 0.153% 0.095% 0.251% 0.230% 0.110% 0.181% 0.067%Tlaxcala 0.153% 0.190% 0.630% 0.103% 0.219% 3.257% 5.645%Veracruz 0.305% 0.476% 0.313% 0.250% 0.836% 5.938% 22.581%Yucatán 0.000% 0.095% 0.700% 0.371% 0.356% 1.350% 9.879%Total 6.572% 11.548% 14.005% 11.078% 18.761% 41.209% 66.801%Source: Mexican Migration Project http://opr.princeton.edu
  12. 12.  1906-1949 <9 years education 97% 2000-2008 <9 years education 47%
  13. 13.  1906-1949 Female migrants 6% 2000-2008 Female migrants 23%
  14. 14.  Year of Migration Percentage Male* Percentage Female* 1906-1949 93.90% 6.10% 1950-1959 90.40% 9.61% 1960-1969 76.00% 24.01% 1970-1979 72.44% 28.00% 1980-1989 71.50% 28.54% 1990-1999 67.45% 33.00% 2000-2008 77.20% 23.00% *Percentages do not equal 100 due to rounding Source: Mexican Migration Project http://opr.princeton.edu
  15. 15.  1906-1949 Occupation agriculture 73%, skilled 2%, personal service workers 2% and unskilled 1% 2000-2008 Occupation agriculture 11%, skilled 34% personal service workers 20%and unskilled 8%
  16. 16. Occupation Percentages for Mexican Migrants in the United StatesOccupation Code 1906-1949 1950-1959 1960-1969 1970-1979 1980-1989 1990-1999 2000-200810-99 4.58% 6.09% 15.80% 15.90% 16.33% 21.32% 12.90%110-119 0.15% 0.10% 0.56% 0.30% 0.41% 0.30% 0.20%120-129 0.00% 0.00% 0.19% 0.30% 0.14% 0.16% 0.34%130-139 0.00% 0.00% 0.19% 0.10% 0.14% 0.08% 0.00%140-149 0.15% 0.00% 0.31% 0.14% 0.19% 0.13% 0.13%210-219 0.00% 0.10% 0.06% 0.25% 0.18% 0.23% 0.20%410-419 73.28% 78.78% 42.00% 30.82% 22.77% 10.90% 11.29%510-519 0.00% 0.10% 0.25% 0.30% 0.23% 0.23% 0.20%520-529 1.98% 2.76% 6.71% 8.95% 10.61% 17.88% 34.14%530-539 0.76% 0.57% 1.10% 0.64% 0.52% 0.82% 0.60%540-549 1.22% 4.66% 13.20% 19.88% 20.74% 14.87% 7.73%550-559 0.61% 0.50% 0.82% 0.60% 0.82% 0.60% 0.13%610-619 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% 0.08% 0.07% 0.18% 0.20%620-629 0.15% 0.19% 1.07% 1.22% 1.23% 1.53% 1.81%710-719 0.61% 0.95% 2.26% 2.10% 3.60% 4.00% 3.00%720-729 0.15% 0.00% 0.00% 0.02% 0.08% 0.18% 0.30%810-819 2.14% 1.81% 8.10% 11.09% 13.31% 17.00% 20.00%820 0.92% 0.57% 2.50% 2.20% 2.30% 0.30% 1.41%830-839 0.00% 0.00% 0.44% 0.14% 0.15% 0.08% 0.13%9999 1.53% 2.85% 5.00% 4.97% 6.20% 6.96% 5.44%Percentages do not equal 100 due to roundingSource: Mexican Migration Project http://opr.princeton.edu
  17. 17. Null Hypothesis=Mexican migrants are thetraditional stereotype-uneducated, underskilled males from the rural areas of westernMexico-Rejected*Alternate Hypothesis=Mexican migrants arenot the stereotype-better educated, moreskilled, more females from urban areas of non-traditional states-Accepted*(*Except for the urban/rural question-inconclusive)
  18. 18. BibliographyCanales, Alejandro I. "Mexican Labour Migration to the United States in the Age of Globalisation." Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 29.4(2003): 741-61. Print.Durand, Jorge, Douglas S. Massey, and Rene M. Zenteno. "MexicanImmigration to the United States: Continuities and Changes." The LatinAmerican Studies Association 36.1 (2001): 107-27. Print.Feliciano, Cynthia. "Gendered Selectivity: U.S. Mexican Immigrants andMexican Nonmigrants, 1960–2000." Latin American Research Review 43.1(2008): 139-60. Print.Kanaiaupuni, Shawn M. "Reframing the Migration Question: An Analysis ofMen, Women, and Gender in Mexico." Social Forces 78.4 (2000): 1311-347.Print.Marcelli, Enrico A., and Wayne A. Cornelius. "The Changing Profile of MexicanMigrants to the United States: New Evidence from California and Mexico."Latin American Research Review 36.3 (2001): 105-31. Print.Valdez-Gardea, Gloria C. "Current Trends in Mexican Migration." Journal ofthe Southwest 51.4 (2009): 563-83. Print.

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