Stanford Center on Longevity - Student Design Challenge 2014-15 Webinar Deck

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Stanford Center on Longevity - Design Challenge 2014-15 Webinar Deck. Discussion of the new Student Design Challenge, in collaboration with Aging2.0

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Stanford Center on Longevity - Student Design Challenge 2014-15 Webinar Deck

  1. 1. 2014-2015 Student Design Challenge In collaboration with Aging2.0 Informational Webinar August 27th 2014 9am PT 1
  2. 2. Agenda 2 9-9:10 Welcome by Aging 2.0: Questions: Hangout / #movedesign / @Aging20 9:10-9:15 Introductions and Moderation Stephen Johnston and Michelle Maalouf, Aging 2.0 9:15- 9:35 Overview and History/Last year's Challenge Ken Smith and Lauren Grieco, Stanford Center on Longevity 9:35- 9:50 Q and A Session Open to web viewers 9:50 - 9:55 Wrap Up More Info Sources to visit http://longevity3.stanford.edu/designchallenge2015/
  3. 3. Aging2.0 is a global innovation network with a mission to connect, educate and support innovators in aging and long-term care DRIVING NEXT GENERATION INNOVATION 3
  4. 4. Startups Industry Investors Older adults Summit We are building a new innovation ecosystem Challenges / Showcases Blog / Content Global Chapters 4
  5. 5. 5 Some mobility challenges for older adults • How to encourage and support personal mobility? – Exercise is an important part of health & wellness goals, but most older adults don’t get enough – Muscle mass correlates to longevity (UCLA, 2014) – challenges around rehabilitation and home physiotherapy – Only 11% of wearable fitness devices sold to 50+ • How to improve mobility around the home and in the community? – 90% of people want to ‘age in place’ (AARP) – 2/3 of older adults in USA don’t have access to public transport – Isolation and loneliness increases risk of death by 40% (UCSF)
  6. 6. 6 Some products already in market: Stylish and fashionable walking sticks and canes
  7. 7. 7 Some products already in market: Exoskeletons and support systems
  8. 8. 8 Some products already in market: Gait analysis, golf swings, 3D visual imagery Clockwise from top: Walkjoy, V1 Golf App, Micosoft Kinect app
  9. 9. 9 Some products already in market: Super-powered wheelchairs, convertible wheelchairs Clockwise from top: Firefly, Agile Life Personal Transportation System, Kenguru, Dodge Minivan
  10. 10. 10 Some products already in market: Social journeys, transport apps, age-friendly cities Clockwise from top: Lyft Line, Age Friendly Cities, Google Maps
  11. 11. Stanfor d C enter on Longevity W ebinar Augus t 27, 2014
  12. 12. What does it mean to live twice as long as your ancestors?
  13. 13. Percentage of the United States Population Over the Age of 65 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 1910 1930 1950 1970 1990 2010 2030 30 Median age 40 65+ 15-64 0-14 37 U.S. 158 million 318 million 370 million 1950 2010 2030
  14. 14. 2035 – More old people than children • Age mix, millions 15-64 <15 65+
  15. 15. China and India • China 1950 2010 2030 65+ 15-64 <15 24 34 41 Median age 0.54 billion 1.35 billion 1.46 billion 65+ 15-64 <15 21 25 32 Median age 0.37 billion 1.21 billion 1.48 million India
  16. 16. 75 is the new 68: Today’s 75-year-old man faces the same mortality risk as a 68-year-old man in 1970. • Source: U.S. Social Security Administration, 2005. 50 59 63 68 75 78 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 2040 2050 Mortality risk reaches 1% Mortality risk reaches 4% A 75-year-old man today has the same risk of dying as a 68-year-old man in 1970.
  17. 17. Has our culture kept up with our longevity gains?
  18. 18. The Stanford Center on Longevity Re-Designing Long Life “To the extent that people arrive at old age mentally sharp, physically fit and financially secure, individuals and societies will thrive.” Laura L. Carstensen, PhD Director, Stanford Center on Longevity Thomas A. Rando, MD, PhD Deputy Director, Stanford Center on Longevity 140+ Faculty Affiliates • Mind • Mobility • Financial Security
  19. 19. Mobility Division Working Principle Compression of Morbidity QualityofLife Age Desired PREVENTION INTERVENTION ACCOMODATION Historically Typical
  20. 20. Stanford Center on Longevity Design Challenge In collaboration with Aging 2.0 Why a design challenge for students? What do we expect to get from it? What do we hope design teams get? - Prizes - Exposure - Connections
  21. 21. 21 “Maximizing Independence for those with Cognitive Impairment” • Launched with sponsorship from the New Retirement Forum • In collaboration with Aging 2.0 • $10K first prize, $5K 2nd, $2K 3rd • 52 entries, 31 universities, 15 countries • 7 Finalists • Finals in person at Stanford April 10th Last Year
  22. 22. 22 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 1 1 2 2 4 1 6 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 12-4-13 52 Entries Total 2 Indicates the # of entries from a single university 2013-2014 SCL Design Challenge Entries In collaboration with Aging 2.0 Platinum: New Retirement Forum Gold: Brookdale / Institute for Optimal Aging, Direct Supply, Eskaton Silver: Home Instead, Silverado, Benchmark Senior Living, Home Care Assistancez Thanks to our Sponsors: Educational / Marketing Partners: Alzheimer’s Association, Caring.com, OnLok Lifeways, Front Porch, AgeTech West, Family Caregivers Alliance. Tech Sponsor: Skild.
  23. 23. 1st Place: EATWELL 23 Sha Yao Academy of Art Institute (San Francisco) 2nd Place: Taste Keio-NUS CUTE Center National University of Singapore 3rd Place: Memory Maps Ritika Mathur Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design THE WINNERS:
  24. 24. 2014-2015 Stanford Center on Longevity Design Challenge Goals: 1. Create well-designed, practical solutions that address key issues associated with aging 2. Encourage a new generation of students to become knowledgeable about aging issues 3. Provide promising designers with a path to drive change in the world Year 2 Overview The 2014-2015 Challenge focuses on solutions to empower mobility among older adults at a personal level by:  Reducing sedentary lifestyles  Encouraging and enabling physical movement and exercise  Reducing barriers to mobility in the home and in the community New Developments • Involvement of President’s Council on Fitness, Sports, and Nutrition • World Economic Forum Engagement
  25. 25. Judging Criteria • Effectiveness – 40% • Originality – 30% • Positive Impact – 20% • Cost Effectiveness – 10%
  26. 26. “Enabling Mobility Across the Life Span” Challenge Timeline Early Communications Kickoff Sept 23rd Summer 2014 Fall 2014 Winter 2015 Spring 2015 Phase I Design Phase I Designs Due Dec 5 Finalists Announced Finals April 9th Mentoring
  27. 27. QUESTIONS? Website: http://longevity3.s tanfor d.edu/des ignc hallenge2015 / Or: http://bit.ly/movedesign Fac ebook : https :// w ww .facebook .c om/R edes ignLongLife Twitter: # mo ve de sig n

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