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AFL in a Secondary School
August 26, 2013
Welcome
• Who came today?
• Please introduce yourself and tell where you are
teaching, or just say hello if we’ve worked together
before.
A brief history (of me)
• 11 years teaching here at AESS, with the last 6 mos. as
acting vp
• 3 years as vp at Prince Rupert Secondary School in
Prince Rupert
• 1 year as vp at Quamichan Middle School in Duncan
• 4 years as principal of Lake Cowichan Secondary
School
• Currently at School District No.48 (Sea to Sky) as
Director of Technology and Innovation
Some handouts and
e-resources
• Sentence strips and Sharpies
• Example course outcomes in student friendly
language
• Learning log and learning journal example
• http://sea2skysd48.wordpress.com
• Follow @peterjory on Twitter
• pjory@sd48.bc.ca
Learning intentions
• Develop a deeper, more practical understanding
of the direction BC and global education is
headed
• Develop a deeper understanding of the way
assessment and learning fit together
• Develop a deeper understanding of Feedback
and several ways to increase it in your classes
• Create some student friendly learning intentions
that can be used right away in an actual class
Schedule for today:
• Conversations about learning and assessment
• Creating an environment with more FEEDBACK
• Lunch
• Conversation about Student Friendly Outcomes
• Time to write learning intentions to use in a class
next week
Traditional learning
• Students in desks nearly
always
• Teacher owns the
knowledge
• Teacher talks, students
listen and take notes
• Marks are seen as
currency
• All students do all
assignments on the
teacher's timelines
• All students are given
summative assessments
on scheduled intervals
Typical marks program
• Each task has a
column
• Each has a 'weight'
• You can assign a zero
or exclude the value
• The program
produces a percentage
for each student
Where is education in BC
going?
• Fewer outcomes
• Personalized learning
• Student Inquiry
• Project-Based Learning
• Blended learning environments where students
move away from the Carnegie model and learn
across disciplines, age groupings, online and face to
face, and synchronously and asynchronously
• The traditional timetable may be on the way out
• Traditional marks may even be on the way out and
report cards may look completely different
The future?
Is this a good fit?
Zugunruhe
• German word for the anxiety a herd
feels just before it moves
Why do we “grade”
assignments?
• Discuss with a partner for 3
minutes
What the research tells us:
• Marks on individual assignments have little or no
motivating effect on students to learn
• Low marks on assignments often have a demotivating
effect in regard to learning
• Students will often attribute low assignment marks to
factors other than their own learning or interest in learning
– such as the teacher’s interest in them
• Low marks often come from a lack of understanding about
the assignment expectations rather than content knowledge
• Students are frequently dissatisfied with the lack of specific
advice they get, and the clarity of the advice they do get.
• Once a mark is given on an assignment –
STUDENTS RARELY LOOK AT THE
FEEDBACK TEACHERS PROVIDE
What the anecdotal information tells us
… if we ask:
• Most students will tell you that though they
“prefer” to get higher marks on assignments, it
would not generally change their behaviour in
regard to LEARNING
• Students want to be successful in their learning
and respond positively to “more help”, meaning
specific information on how to improve
• THEY WANT AND NEED MORE FEEDBACK
• http://meganjakse.blogspot.ca/2011/08/5-years-later-as
How do we define rigour in
the classroom?
• Is it “having standards” and turning students
back when they don’t reach them?
• Is it by adding more work at the same level of
difficulty?
• Is it by lesson design that moves students
towards deeper thinking?
Are we teaching curriculum ...
or are we teaching students?
• Psst!
Please say students.
Are we teaching compliance ... or are
we teaching students to think?
• Do we still want to graduate the best darn
factory workers in the whole entire world?
• Please say no.
Are we really assessing Student
learning?
• Or are we being unduly influenced by
neatness, organization, and compliance?
• Report card comment examples:
Peter Grade 5
Peter Grade 6
Did I really degrade over the
summer?
• Maybe.
• There are likely some other factors though ...
Task Completion and
Learning
• What assumptions to we make about the
connection between these two concepts?
• Can you think of some examples of when you
have seen little or no connection with an
assignment in your class?
• Can you think of a time when learning became
the absolute focus with little regard for task
completion?
• Walk and talk with a partner or group or three,
then report back when we return.
• Discuss with a partner and share out
Take a Lap!
Reporting Time!
Evaluation:
• Is about comparing where students are
in their learning in relation to where
they are expected to be.
Lesson design becomes
more important
• Are the students really learning what they are
supposed to be learning?
• Do you know what that is? Do they know what that
is?
• Are you constantly sharing and discussing that
information with them?
• Are you building in opportunities to personalize
and co-design along with them?
• Does your assessment practice support all this?
What can you do to tie these
together?
• This requires constant reflection and
having mechanisms in place to
encourage that to happen
AFL Big Six
• Learning Intentions
• Criteria
• Questions
• Feedback
• Peer and Self-Assessment
• Ownership
Why do we practice?
• Consider an area where you consider
practice important.
• Discuss for three minutes with a partner
Feedback:
• is the specific information that helps a student get
from where they are in their learning to where
they need to be
• must be timely, specific, usable
• is not "good job"
• is not a "zero"
• encourages reflective thinking
What is feedback continued ...
• “.. Feedback needs to provide information
specifically relating to the task or process of learning
that fills a gap between what is understood and
what is aimed to be understood.” –Sadler
• “Our feedback must tell students not just what needs
to be improved, but also how to go about it.”
-Wiliam
• “Learning is more likely to be fostered when
feedback focuses on features of the task (success
criteria) and emphasizes learning goals.” -Kluger &
DeNisi
• “In giving students descriptive feedback, you have
modeled the kind of thinking you want them to do as
self-assessors.” -Chappius
Does it matter?
• John Hattie meta-analysis
When do we give FEEDBACK?
•“Any feedback that students can't act upon or do
something about is useless.” –Schimmer
•“Students can assess themselves only when they
have a clear pic of the targets their learning is
meant to attain.” -Black & Wiliam
• "Feedback needs to come while the students still
think of the learning goal as a learning goal ... "
-Brookhart
I give feedback by:
• Kagan time!
• Stand up, move to an open space, and find
someone you haven't been sitting with
• Share one way you give feedback in your class
• Switch and repeat
• Circle Share
What could it look like to maximize feedback in your
classroom tomorrow?
• More interactions each class. Either go to them or have
them come to you, but strive to have at least one more
“check in” with every student every day, check for
understanding, and give some specific information to
guide their learning
• More steps built into your assignments where students
can share, reflect, discuss, and revise their evidence of
learning
• More chances for you to review assignments with
students before giving a summative mark
• Opportunities for students to resubmit assignments or
rewrite tests if they can show evidence that their
learning has evolved (because the “test” you
arbitrarily put on that day should not mean removing
any further motivation to learn or show learning)
Increasing feedback:
• Know that this is what makes the difference to learning
and make sure that daily conversations occur with each
student
• Create an Environment of Practice -revising and
rewriting not just allowed but actually expected!
• Keep the summative mark out of the process as long as
possible
• Know that your students will do fewer assignments, but
that each one will become more meaningful
• Fully formative assessment process
Remember, assessment is a
conversation!
• You can start with the three critical questions :
1. What are you learning?
2. How is it going?
3. Where do you need to go next?
A simple but powerful change in
semantics:
• Replace the words “doing” and
“working on” with “learning”
Can every moment in your classroom
be important?
• “You’re missing your learning right now.”
• It’s not about logging time in the room.
Checking for understanding
• What strategies do you use to know if the students
actually know what you need them to know in order
to go further?
• Four fingers example
What ELSE can be done to increase
the effect of feedback?
• Key course outcomes (soon to be competencies)
are shared at onset using student-friendly
language if possible
• Learning intentions every day
• All major assignments have specific (and
preferably) co-constructed criteria
• Each draft of each assignment must receive
teacher (and ideally peer and self) FEEDBACK
And ...
•More assignments are deemed to be practice, and how
many are completed will differ between students
•Key assignments are mandatory, may receive letter
grades based on the criteria (ideally in a co-created rubric),
and missing any of them at reporting time means the
student is at an “I” or “In Progress” level
•Fewer assignments are completed. Focus is on quality
instead of quantity.
And to really go “All IN” …
• Achievement really starts at the C+ level – meaning
if a student has all of their key assignments in and at
the “Fully Meeting” level, they would have at least a
C+ when it comes time for reporting
• Their achievement level is determined through
conversation using the evidence of learning they
have provided compared with the criteria you have
set for the course (using the appropriate resources)
• Assignment tracking can use an old mark book or
Excel spreadsheet – but there is no averaging or
calculating done!
"We don't talk about pass or fail
anymore ..."
"....We talk about 'iterations.' "
The Power of Switching
•For “struggling and reluctant” learners: Transition from
just passing to mastery (No more, “I just want the 5/10.”)
•Migration of more learning to exam situation for
struggling and reluctant learners
•Focus on learning instead of doing improves ownership
• Improved achievement for “high achievers” as they get
the “stretch” learning they need to excel at the next level,
instead of giving them credit for previously learned skills
The beauty of no zeros:
• Every thing is still in play. Every moment in the
classroom still has a purpose. Every day is an
opportunity to re-motivate.
• “I still haven’t seen your ________ project. You can
continue your learning on that right now.”
Got an exam course? Got an exam of
any kind?
Let me say this one more time:
•Deeper learning equals more transfer from one
environment to the next
•Translation: Higher Test Scores
After trying it:
•“I can’t go back.”
•Further experiences with English 10 and
Communications 11/12, both of which are exam courses
•Differential between class average and MOE Exam
average gets very tight – we start to teach and assess
more in line with the Ministry curricula and standards
•Translation: What you and the students think they
know is much closer to what the Ministry wants them to
know.
Sound weird?
• Discuss with a
partner!
Yes, this is all fine and good, but what
about me?
• Q: Will I be doing more “marking”?
• A: Probably, but if most of your formative
assessment involves timely conversations with your
students, it is collaborative work that directly
impacts learning, as apposed to work in isolation
that (sadly) has very little impact at all!
“Me” continued:
• Q: If I don’t have firm deadlines, won’t I get buried
with assignments at the end of a term?
• A: We haven’t found that. Also, keep in mind that if
your assessments are ongoing, the students’
evidence of learning is both well known to you and
very polished by the time it is submitted for a
summative mark, and requires little or no work at
that time!
“Me” continued:
• Q: “I’ll need to have the support of my principal
and explain what I’m doing to my students and
their parents.”
• A: Yes. That would be wise.
“Me” continued:
• Q: “What about my mark book?”
• A: Hmm. Yes. It probably needs to change ...
Perhaps ...
• Your “columns” could be grouped into outcomes or
competencies where evidence of student practice
and examples of learning are tallied, then when
proficiency is achieved there is a place to record that
assessment
Most Importantly:
• Let’s get away from focusing on tasks to complete
and using grades as a currency to reward
compliance - either intentionally or as a by product
of how we assess.
• Instead let’s try to focus on learning and measuring
what students actually know and can actually do!
If Nothing Else ...
• Make it a priority to have one more meaningful
interaction with each student every class about their
learning!
Lunch
What are we Learning?
• Students need to know what they need to know
When students struggle with an
assignment:
• It is often because they do not understand either the
instructions, or the purpose of the assignment, or
both.
• “Because I said so” only works with compliant
students, and it turns out they don’t really like it
much either.
The more you involve students in this
conversation:
• the more they will be able to participate in the
design of projects and assignments that move their
learning forward
• the more they will be able to discuss their learning
with you
• the more they will take ownership over that
learning and become active and engaged in the
entire process
This is the place ...
... where we all want to go.
Creating Student Friendly
Outcomes
• Start with your course PLO binder - or better yet, new
(draft) course competencies if you can get them
• Select the most important information and focus just on
the essentials. Seriously. Cut the junk.
• You may want to convert to student friendly language.
This will take some time but it is well worth it. (Share
Com example.)
• Break down the outcomes into more discreet chunks that
can be the focus of attention for 20-80 minutes
Having a way for students to
connect and reflect will add to the
positive effect.
• Examples of Learning Log and Learning Journal
Creating and sharing “I can”
Statements:
• in student-friendly language will offer added clarity
to both you and your students
This is a journey
• Developing learning intentions that precisely
identify the purpose of each lesson takes practice,
reflection, and consistent effort
• Learning teams are crucial to this process
• Be tenacious about it, but start
with one course
Follow up as a staff. Then, follow
up again.
• During learning time at staff meetings, PLC time (if you
have it) or a future pro-d session, check-in with your
peers regarding this strategy, using the three critical
questions
Another truth about learning
intentions (and criteria):
• The more reflecting you do on the specific nature of
the learning you want students to master, the
clearer and more effective your feedback will
become, and the more successful your students will
be.
Assignment for today:
• Pick a class you know well or where you have or
can easily get the outcomes or competencies
• Choose a section of learning you are planning for
your class and begin or review the planning process
• Develop a set of learning intentions that can be
shared with the class, either daily, as a unit, or in an
ongoing way.
It is a good idea to:
• Work in draft form until you really like the wording
• Share and discuss with a learning partner as you go
• Intentions can be shared on handouts, on the
whiteboard, via projector or Smartboard, or on
sentence strips
Work time:
• Strive to get some product down in the next 30
minutes, then we will reconvene and share how it is
going before continuing on
Share out:
• Where are you in your learning?
• How is it going?
• Where do you need to go next?
Is it time for more coffee?
Now keep going.
Wrap up and next steps:
• Keep tinkering with the language and making the
practice of learning intentions consistent in at least
one class
• Keep talking to a learning partner or a team
• Look forward to future conversations in staff
meetings where you will get an opportunity to
share, revise, and hopefully expand your practice
Learning Intentions (Review)
• Develop a deeper, more practical understanding of
the direction BC and global education is headed
• Develop a greater understanding of the way
assessment and learning fit together
• Develop a greater understanding of Feedback and
several ways to increase it in your classes
• Create some student friendly learning intentions
that can be used right away in an actual class
Now Keep Going.
Thank you!

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AFL at AESS

  • 1. AFL in a Secondary School August 26, 2013
  • 2. Welcome • Who came today? • Please introduce yourself and tell where you are teaching, or just say hello if we’ve worked together before.
  • 3. A brief history (of me) • 11 years teaching here at AESS, with the last 6 mos. as acting vp • 3 years as vp at Prince Rupert Secondary School in Prince Rupert • 1 year as vp at Quamichan Middle School in Duncan • 4 years as principal of Lake Cowichan Secondary School • Currently at School District No.48 (Sea to Sky) as Director of Technology and Innovation
  • 4. Some handouts and e-resources • Sentence strips and Sharpies • Example course outcomes in student friendly language • Learning log and learning journal example • http://sea2skysd48.wordpress.com • Follow @peterjory on Twitter • pjory@sd48.bc.ca
  • 5. Learning intentions • Develop a deeper, more practical understanding of the direction BC and global education is headed • Develop a deeper understanding of the way assessment and learning fit together • Develop a deeper understanding of Feedback and several ways to increase it in your classes • Create some student friendly learning intentions that can be used right away in an actual class
  • 6. Schedule for today: • Conversations about learning and assessment • Creating an environment with more FEEDBACK • Lunch • Conversation about Student Friendly Outcomes • Time to write learning intentions to use in a class next week
  • 7. Traditional learning • Students in desks nearly always • Teacher owns the knowledge • Teacher talks, students listen and take notes • Marks are seen as currency • All students do all assignments on the teacher's timelines • All students are given summative assessments on scheduled intervals
  • 8. Typical marks program • Each task has a column • Each has a 'weight' • You can assign a zero or exclude the value • The program produces a percentage for each student
  • 9. Where is education in BC going? • Fewer outcomes • Personalized learning • Student Inquiry • Project-Based Learning • Blended learning environments where students move away from the Carnegie model and learn across disciplines, age groupings, online and face to face, and synchronously and asynchronously • The traditional timetable may be on the way out • Traditional marks may even be on the way out and report cards may look completely different
  • 11. Is this a good fit?
  • 12. Zugunruhe • German word for the anxiety a herd feels just before it moves
  • 13. Why do we “grade” assignments? • Discuss with a partner for 3 minutes
  • 14. What the research tells us: • Marks on individual assignments have little or no motivating effect on students to learn • Low marks on assignments often have a demotivating effect in regard to learning • Students will often attribute low assignment marks to factors other than their own learning or interest in learning – such as the teacher’s interest in them • Low marks often come from a lack of understanding about the assignment expectations rather than content knowledge • Students are frequently dissatisfied with the lack of specific advice they get, and the clarity of the advice they do get. • Once a mark is given on an assignment – STUDENTS RARELY LOOK AT THE FEEDBACK TEACHERS PROVIDE
  • 15. What the anecdotal information tells us … if we ask: • Most students will tell you that though they “prefer” to get higher marks on assignments, it would not generally change their behaviour in regard to LEARNING • Students want to be successful in their learning and respond positively to “more help”, meaning specific information on how to improve • THEY WANT AND NEED MORE FEEDBACK • http://meganjakse.blogspot.ca/2011/08/5-years-later-as
  • 16. How do we define rigour in the classroom? • Is it “having standards” and turning students back when they don’t reach them? • Is it by adding more work at the same level of difficulty? • Is it by lesson design that moves students towards deeper thinking?
  • 17. Are we teaching curriculum ... or are we teaching students? • Psst! Please say students.
  • 18. Are we teaching compliance ... or are we teaching students to think? • Do we still want to graduate the best darn factory workers in the whole entire world? • Please say no.
  • 19. Are we really assessing Student learning? • Or are we being unduly influenced by neatness, organization, and compliance? • Report card comment examples:
  • 22. Did I really degrade over the summer? • Maybe. • There are likely some other factors though ...
  • 23. Task Completion and Learning • What assumptions to we make about the connection between these two concepts? • Can you think of some examples of when you have seen little or no connection with an assignment in your class? • Can you think of a time when learning became the absolute focus with little regard for task completion? • Walk and talk with a partner or group or three, then report back when we return. • Discuss with a partner and share out
  • 26. Evaluation: • Is about comparing where students are in their learning in relation to where they are expected to be.
  • 27. Lesson design becomes more important • Are the students really learning what they are supposed to be learning? • Do you know what that is? Do they know what that is? • Are you constantly sharing and discussing that information with them? • Are you building in opportunities to personalize and co-design along with them? • Does your assessment practice support all this?
  • 28. What can you do to tie these together? • This requires constant reflection and having mechanisms in place to encourage that to happen
  • 29. AFL Big Six • Learning Intentions • Criteria • Questions • Feedback • Peer and Self-Assessment • Ownership
  • 30. Why do we practice? • Consider an area where you consider practice important. • Discuss for three minutes with a partner
  • 31. Feedback: • is the specific information that helps a student get from where they are in their learning to where they need to be • must be timely, specific, usable • is not "good job" • is not a "zero" • encourages reflective thinking
  • 32. What is feedback continued ... • “.. Feedback needs to provide information specifically relating to the task or process of learning that fills a gap between what is understood and what is aimed to be understood.” –Sadler • “Our feedback must tell students not just what needs to be improved, but also how to go about it.” -Wiliam • “Learning is more likely to be fostered when feedback focuses on features of the task (success criteria) and emphasizes learning goals.” -Kluger & DeNisi • “In giving students descriptive feedback, you have modeled the kind of thinking you want them to do as self-assessors.” -Chappius
  • 33. Does it matter? • John Hattie meta-analysis
  • 34. When do we give FEEDBACK? •“Any feedback that students can't act upon or do something about is useless.” –Schimmer •“Students can assess themselves only when they have a clear pic of the targets their learning is meant to attain.” -Black & Wiliam • "Feedback needs to come while the students still think of the learning goal as a learning goal ... " -Brookhart
  • 35. I give feedback by: • Kagan time! • Stand up, move to an open space, and find someone you haven't been sitting with • Share one way you give feedback in your class • Switch and repeat • Circle Share
  • 36. What could it look like to maximize feedback in your classroom tomorrow? • More interactions each class. Either go to them or have them come to you, but strive to have at least one more “check in” with every student every day, check for understanding, and give some specific information to guide their learning • More steps built into your assignments where students can share, reflect, discuss, and revise their evidence of learning • More chances for you to review assignments with students before giving a summative mark • Opportunities for students to resubmit assignments or rewrite tests if they can show evidence that their learning has evolved (because the “test” you arbitrarily put on that day should not mean removing any further motivation to learn or show learning)
  • 37. Increasing feedback: • Know that this is what makes the difference to learning and make sure that daily conversations occur with each student • Create an Environment of Practice -revising and rewriting not just allowed but actually expected! • Keep the summative mark out of the process as long as possible • Know that your students will do fewer assignments, but that each one will become more meaningful • Fully formative assessment process
  • 38. Remember, assessment is a conversation! • You can start with the three critical questions : 1. What are you learning? 2. How is it going? 3. Where do you need to go next?
  • 39. A simple but powerful change in semantics: • Replace the words “doing” and “working on” with “learning”
  • 40. Can every moment in your classroom be important? • “You’re missing your learning right now.” • It’s not about logging time in the room.
  • 41. Checking for understanding • What strategies do you use to know if the students actually know what you need them to know in order to go further? • Four fingers example
  • 42. What ELSE can be done to increase the effect of feedback? • Key course outcomes (soon to be competencies) are shared at onset using student-friendly language if possible • Learning intentions every day • All major assignments have specific (and preferably) co-constructed criteria • Each draft of each assignment must receive teacher (and ideally peer and self) FEEDBACK
  • 43. And ... •More assignments are deemed to be practice, and how many are completed will differ between students •Key assignments are mandatory, may receive letter grades based on the criteria (ideally in a co-created rubric), and missing any of them at reporting time means the student is at an “I” or “In Progress” level •Fewer assignments are completed. Focus is on quality instead of quantity.
  • 44. And to really go “All IN” … • Achievement really starts at the C+ level – meaning if a student has all of their key assignments in and at the “Fully Meeting” level, they would have at least a C+ when it comes time for reporting • Their achievement level is determined through conversation using the evidence of learning they have provided compared with the criteria you have set for the course (using the appropriate resources) • Assignment tracking can use an old mark book or Excel spreadsheet – but there is no averaging or calculating done!
  • 45. "We don't talk about pass or fail anymore ..." "....We talk about 'iterations.' "
  • 46. The Power of Switching •For “struggling and reluctant” learners: Transition from just passing to mastery (No more, “I just want the 5/10.”) •Migration of more learning to exam situation for struggling and reluctant learners •Focus on learning instead of doing improves ownership • Improved achievement for “high achievers” as they get the “stretch” learning they need to excel at the next level, instead of giving them credit for previously learned skills
  • 47. The beauty of no zeros: • Every thing is still in play. Every moment in the classroom still has a purpose. Every day is an opportunity to re-motivate. • “I still haven’t seen your ________ project. You can continue your learning on that right now.”
  • 48. Got an exam course? Got an exam of any kind? Let me say this one more time: •Deeper learning equals more transfer from one environment to the next •Translation: Higher Test Scores
  • 49. After trying it: •“I can’t go back.” •Further experiences with English 10 and Communications 11/12, both of which are exam courses •Differential between class average and MOE Exam average gets very tight – we start to teach and assess more in line with the Ministry curricula and standards •Translation: What you and the students think they know is much closer to what the Ministry wants them to know.
  • 50. Sound weird? • Discuss with a partner!
  • 51. Yes, this is all fine and good, but what about me? • Q: Will I be doing more “marking”? • A: Probably, but if most of your formative assessment involves timely conversations with your students, it is collaborative work that directly impacts learning, as apposed to work in isolation that (sadly) has very little impact at all!
  • 52. “Me” continued: • Q: If I don’t have firm deadlines, won’t I get buried with assignments at the end of a term? • A: We haven’t found that. Also, keep in mind that if your assessments are ongoing, the students’ evidence of learning is both well known to you and very polished by the time it is submitted for a summative mark, and requires little or no work at that time!
  • 53. “Me” continued: • Q: “I’ll need to have the support of my principal and explain what I’m doing to my students and their parents.” • A: Yes. That would be wise.
  • 54. “Me” continued: • Q: “What about my mark book?” • A: Hmm. Yes. It probably needs to change ...
  • 55. Perhaps ... • Your “columns” could be grouped into outcomes or competencies where evidence of student practice and examples of learning are tallied, then when proficiency is achieved there is a place to record that assessment
  • 56. Most Importantly: • Let’s get away from focusing on tasks to complete and using grades as a currency to reward compliance - either intentionally or as a by product of how we assess. • Instead let’s try to focus on learning and measuring what students actually know and can actually do!
  • 57. If Nothing Else ... • Make it a priority to have one more meaningful interaction with each student every class about their learning!
  • 58. Lunch
  • 59. What are we Learning? • Students need to know what they need to know
  • 60. When students struggle with an assignment: • It is often because they do not understand either the instructions, or the purpose of the assignment, or both. • “Because I said so” only works with compliant students, and it turns out they don’t really like it much either.
  • 61. The more you involve students in this conversation: • the more they will be able to participate in the design of projects and assignments that move their learning forward • the more they will be able to discuss their learning with you • the more they will take ownership over that learning and become active and engaged in the entire process
  • 62. This is the place ... ... where we all want to go.
  • 63. Creating Student Friendly Outcomes • Start with your course PLO binder - or better yet, new (draft) course competencies if you can get them • Select the most important information and focus just on the essentials. Seriously. Cut the junk. • You may want to convert to student friendly language. This will take some time but it is well worth it. (Share Com example.) • Break down the outcomes into more discreet chunks that can be the focus of attention for 20-80 minutes
  • 64. Having a way for students to connect and reflect will add to the positive effect. • Examples of Learning Log and Learning Journal
  • 65. Creating and sharing “I can” Statements: • in student-friendly language will offer added clarity to both you and your students
  • 66. This is a journey • Developing learning intentions that precisely identify the purpose of each lesson takes practice, reflection, and consistent effort • Learning teams are crucial to this process • Be tenacious about it, but start with one course
  • 67. Follow up as a staff. Then, follow up again. • During learning time at staff meetings, PLC time (if you have it) or a future pro-d session, check-in with your peers regarding this strategy, using the three critical questions
  • 68. Another truth about learning intentions (and criteria): • The more reflecting you do on the specific nature of the learning you want students to master, the clearer and more effective your feedback will become, and the more successful your students will be.
  • 69. Assignment for today: • Pick a class you know well or where you have or can easily get the outcomes or competencies • Choose a section of learning you are planning for your class and begin or review the planning process • Develop a set of learning intentions that can be shared with the class, either daily, as a unit, or in an ongoing way.
  • 70. It is a good idea to: • Work in draft form until you really like the wording • Share and discuss with a learning partner as you go • Intentions can be shared on handouts, on the whiteboard, via projector or Smartboard, or on sentence strips
  • 71. Work time: • Strive to get some product down in the next 30 minutes, then we will reconvene and share how it is going before continuing on
  • 72. Share out: • Where are you in your learning? • How is it going? • Where do you need to go next?
  • 73. Is it time for more coffee?
  • 75. Wrap up and next steps: • Keep tinkering with the language and making the practice of learning intentions consistent in at least one class • Keep talking to a learning partner or a team • Look forward to future conversations in staff meetings where you will get an opportunity to share, revise, and hopefully expand your practice
  • 76. Learning Intentions (Review) • Develop a deeper, more practical understanding of the direction BC and global education is headed • Develop a greater understanding of the way assessment and learning fit together • Develop a greater understanding of Feedback and several ways to increase it in your classes • Create some student friendly learning intentions that can be used right away in an actual class