Resonate! How 90 Seconds of Cello Music Is Helping People Connect With Climate Science

1,503 views

Published on

Anthropogenic climate change is one of the most challenging problems humanity faces, but public opinion surveys show that many people are skeptical about global warming. In this seminar, Dan Crawford, Scott St. George and Todd Reubold will share their experiences with using music to help climate science reach out to new audiences. Their first collaboration — a music video that reconfigures global temperature data as a cello composition — has been described as “amazing, and eerie” and “an effective tool to show people that our planet is changing.” Join us to learn what global warming sounds like!

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,503
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
9
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Resonate! How 90 Seconds of Cello Music Is Helping People Connect With Climate Science

  1. 1. LARGE CLASS
  2. 2. HTTP://WWW.NRMSC.USGS.GOV/REPEATPHOTO/OVERVIEW.HTM USGS REPEAT PHOTOGRAPHY PROJECT
  3. 3. In September 2012, Arctic sea ice reached the smallest extent ever recorded in more than three decades of satellite measurements.
  4. 4. How have average annual temperatures changed across the planet? 1 °F 0.5 0 -0.5 1880 1900 Source: NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000
  5. 5. “ This is simply outstanding!  I'm really excited about this. Jon Foley, Institute on the Environment March 12, 2013 ”
  6. 6. NOT ALL OUR REVIEWS WERE POSITIVE.
  7. 7. “ I don’t quite know what to feel about [this video]; pleased that a passion for artistic creation lurks in the soul of a dendrochronologist, or astonished that a research intern would spend time on something so frivolous. Ivan Hewi , Music critic August 30, 2013 ”
  8. 8. 133K VIEWS
  9. 9. “ However, sometimes converting a simple graph into some different form of information can deliver the message far be er, and more effectively, than dots on a page. Phil Plait, Bad Astronomy July 18, 2013 ”

×