GEOG5839.13, Sampling strategies

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GEOG5839.13, Sampling strategies

  1. 1. October 18 23 the ‘detrended’ ring-widthSampling aggregateThe linearstrategies model of tree growth index
  2. 2. THE PRINCIPLE OFECOLOGICAL AMPLITUDEA tree species may grow and reproduce over a certain rangeof habitats; that range is described as its ecological amplitude.Trees that grow near the margins or limits of their ecologicalamplitude are o en sensitive to changes in their environment.
  3. 3. h p://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/li le/
  4. 4. Source: Phil Camill
  5. 5. Average temperatures are remarkably consistent at treeline locations around the world.Source: Körner and Paulsen, Journal of Biogeography, 2004
  6. 6. THE LAW OF THE MINIMUM Growth is controlled by the scarcest resource (limiting factor), not the total amount of resources available
  7. 7. THE PRINCIPLE OFSITE SELECTIONDendrochronologists should apply the principles oflimiting factors and ecological amplitude to determinewhich trees are most likely to provide information about aspecific environmental signal.
  8. 8. ecotone a transitional area where one plant community changesinto another, usually caused by changes in the environment suchas changes in elevation or soil characteristics.
  9. 9. h p://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/li le/
  10. 10. Source: Greg Brooks
  11. 11. Source: Phil Camill
  12. 12. h p://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/li le/
  13. 13. Dr. Hal Fri sUniversity of Arizona
  14. 14. Source: Fritts et al., Ecology, 1965
  15. 15. where do we find old trees?
  16. 16. Trees can grow anywhere!
  17. 17. Intermountain bristlecone pine 4,844 yearsSource: Tom Harlan
  18. 18. h p://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/li le/
  19. 19. Methuselah RidgeSource: Tom Harlan
  20. 20. Bristlecone comparison photos
  21. 21. Wind erosion on bristlecone tagSource: Tom Harlan
  22. 22. Bristlecone vista Alerce 3,622 yearsSource: Tim Waters
  23. 23. distribution map ofFITZROYA CUPRESSOIDES
  24. 24. Giant sequoia 3,266 yearsSource: Julie Jordan Sco
  25. 25. h p://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/li le/
  26. 26. Source: Byron Hetrick
  27. 27. Bristlecone vista Coast redwood 2,200 yearsSource: hoppinjonn
  28. 28. h p://esp.cr.usgs.gov/data/atlas/li le/
  29. 29. Source: Brandi Korte
  30. 30. The Seward oak 330 yr?Source: Ralph Sievert
  31. 31. White cedar 1452Source: Danny Margoles
  32. 32. OLDLIST h p://www.rmtrr.org/oldlist.htm
  33. 33. Eastern OLDLIST h p://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/~adk/oldlisteast/
  34. 34. “ Size ma ers not. Look at me. ” Judge me by my size, do you? Hm? Mmmm. Yoda
  35. 35. Crown shapefla ened, ‘bonsai’ shape, sparseand open, may be lopsided.
  36. 36. Branchesfew but large
  37. 37. Trunk shapecolumnar
  38. 38. youngest IDEALIZED SILHOUETTES OF middle PONDEROSA PINES oldest good sites poor sitesSource: Huckaby et al., 2003
  39. 39. Dr. Neil Pederson Lamont-Doherty Earth Observation
  40. 40. Pederson, N. 2010. External characteristicsof old trees in the Eastern Deciduous Forest.Natural Areas Journal 30, 396:407.
  41. 41. SIXCHARACTERISTICS OF OLD TREES smooth bark low stem taper high stem sinuosity crowns with few, thick, twisting limbs low crown volume low ratio of leaf area to trunk volume
  42. 42. Quercus alba <150 yr, with flaky barkSource: Neil Pederson
  43. 43. Quercus alba >250 yr, with low ridging on the barkSource: Neil Pederson
  44. 44. Liriodendron tulipifera ca. 80 yrSource: Neil Pederson
  45. 45. Liriodendron tulipifera ca. 500 yrSource: Neil Pederson
  46. 46. Quercus muehlenbergii ca. 399 yr, with a low stem taperSource: A. Wiggs
  47. 47. Lirodendron tulipifera showing serpentine bole and characteristic crown architectureSource: Neil Pederson
  48. 48. Quercus muehlenbergii ca. 348 yr, with only a few large branches in its crown.Source: Neil Pederson
  49. 49. Source: Diane Main
  50. 50. L. tulipifera with broken crown (le ) and a celery top crown (right)Source: Neil Pederson
  51. 51. Source: Imagin Extra
  52. 52. where do we find tree-ring data?
  53. 53. INTERNATIONALTREE-RINGDATABANK h p://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/treering.html
  54. 54. Exercise!Use Google Earth to review the globaldistribution of tree-ring data.
  55. 55. THE PRINCIPLE OF CROSS-DATING THE PRINCIPLE OFAGGREGATE TREE GROWTH THE PRINCIPLE OF REPLICATION STANDARDIZATION THE PRINCIPLE OFECOLOGICAL AMPLITUDE THE PRINCIPLE OF SITE SELECTION
  56. 56. GEOG8280 XT C L AS SNE

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