RFID: where we are - where we're going

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Delivered by Mick Fortune, Consultant, at the Annual Conference of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals in Scotland (CILIPS), which took place 1-3 June 2009.

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  • Not talking about Implementing self-service, differences between RFID suppliers, cultural change
  • To explain why let’s quickly remind ourselves what we’re talking about
  • …and this is what is holding back further development
  • But the most relevant is data
  • Now we can all drive on the same side of the road!
  • RFID: where we are - where we're going

    1. 1. RFID: Where we are. Where we’re going? Mick Fortune Library RFID Ltd.
    2. 2. Overview • 2010 – a watershed moment • A (very) quick review of the technology • Main library uses • RFID ≠ Self-service • Removing barriers to progress
    3. 3. 2010 – a watershed moment • New standards being created/published • Greater consensus among stakeholders • A new spirit of co-operation
    4. 4. A (very) quick review of the technology
    5. 5. RFID - the basics • A technology, not an application • A chip attached to an aerial activated by a scanner. – Data on the chip can be stored, edited and over-written • Contactless – uses radio • Operates at different frequencies/ranges
    6. 6. Typical UK library implementation • Tags – on stock (different types for different media) – Three elements • Chip – stores the data • Aerial – allows transmission • Form factor – usually a sticky label • Antenna/Reader • Application – Provides local functionality (screen displays etc.) – Handles messaging between it (usually via SIP) and the Library Management System – which executes rules.
    7. 7. Main Library Uses* • Self-service % – Issue and Return 100 – Automated returns sorting 25 – Renewals 76 – Borrower account review 39.3 – Fees and fines payment 21.4 • Stock Management – Tracing operations (missing, lost, reserved) 35.7 – Inventory 39.3 – “Smart” shelving 3.6 • Borrower Administration – Smart cards 10.7 * Survey carried out among subscribers to LIB-RFID February 2009 Results available from www.libraryrfid.co.uk.
    8. 8. RFID ≠ Self-Service • Self Service: – Main reason given for implementation (84%) – Issue and return automated by 100% of RFID users. • But – It’s not just a barcode replacement – It changes the way your stock “works” – It can be (and is) used to store dynamic data - and that may be problematic…
    9. 9. Problematic? Because • Each RFID supplier stores data differently • Each library may be storing different elements (although they may unaware that they are!) • LMS providers may enhance functionality by using tags in proprietary solutions • Some RFID suppliers may encrypt data. So, • If you buy RFID hardware from another supplier it may not work with your tags. • If you change your LMS or RFID supplier things may stop working.
    10. 10. Removing barriers to progress
    11. 11. Standards can help • But there are so many to choose from… • Communications – ISO 18000-3 – ISO 15693 • Frequencies – UHF – HF (13.56Mhz) • Data
    12. 12. Data Standards • ISO 28560 – 28560-2, the common data model for the UK – To be published Q4 2009 – Defines 25 data elements for use in the library supply chain as a whole • UK National Profile – Defines subset to be used for library operations – Voluntary agreement
    13. 13. UK National Profile • Mandatory elements: – Primary item identifier (normally an existing barcode number.) – Content parameter in effect a list of data elements present on the tag. – Owner library (ISIL) • Conditional: – Set information (multiple items) • Optional: – Type of usage – Local data A – Shelf location – Local data B – ONIX media format – Local data C – Supplier identifier – Title – ILL borrowing institution (ISIL) – Supply chain stage – Alternative item identifier – Subsidiary of an owner library
    14. 14. Deployment • New users should be encouraged to specify ISO 28560-2 and the UK National Profile • Existing users will have to determine, – Whether they have a migration path – If they want to take it • Do the research – don’t buy Betamax!
    15. 15. Beyond SIP • SIP no longer adequate • Series of workshops proposed by BIC will, – Examine existing tag data usage in RFID installations – Identify requirements to incorporate these within a standards-based framework – Review alternatives to SIP (and NCIP) for LMS/RFID communications
    16. 16. New services - new technologies? • Better offline circulation • Interactive shelving/displays • Talking books • Improvements in security • …and who knows what else?
    17. 17. Thank You! Mick Fortune Library RFID Ltd. mick@libraryrfid.co.uk +44 (0)1865 727411 www.libraryrfid.co.uk

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