Dr. Mark Hepworth Department of Information Science Loughborough University The Information Literacy journey
A journey: defining information literacy <ul><li>Where have we come from? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are we now? </li></ul><u...
Where have we come from? <ul><li>The desire or need for more people to take advantage of higher education – often coming f...
Where are we now? <ul><li>High level ‘drivers’ </li></ul><ul><li>Increased emphasis on the value of people’s capabilities ...
Where are we now? <ul><li>Still dealing with challenges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Institutional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cap...
Where are we now? <ul><li>Changing ideas about information literacy </li></ul><ul><li>The fact that our relationship with ...
Where are we going? <ul><li>Realising the complexity of how people learn and learning about how to teach information liter...
Where are we going? <ul><li>Understanding the contextual nature of information literacy and the need to integrate IL into ...
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Information literacy - why we need it

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CILIPS IL event January Dr Mark Hepworth

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Information literacy - why we need it

  1. 1. Dr. Mark Hepworth Department of Information Science Loughborough University The Information Literacy journey
  2. 2. A journey: defining information literacy <ul><li>Where have we come from? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are we now? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are we going? </li></ul>
  3. 3. Where have we come from? <ul><li>The desire or need for more people to take advantage of higher education – often coming from non-traditional backgrounds </li></ul><ul><li>Students entering with low levels of information literacy – misplaced ‘Google’ expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Generalised, high level models – ANZIL, CILIP, ACRL, SCONUL etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Stemming, generally, from higher education and, to some extent, schools </li></ul><ul><li>Individualistic </li></ul><ul><li>Focused on a discrete skills set – related to doing a project </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasis on ‘what people do’ and to a limited extent ‘what people think’ – little emphasis on the culture of information literacy and the context specific nature of information literacy. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Where are we now? <ul><li>High level ‘drivers’ </li></ul><ul><li>Increased emphasis on the value of people’s capabilities – learning organisations, independent learners, lifelong learning, intellectual assets, people as ‘capital’ </li></ul><ul><li>The need to deal with information intensive workplace – increase in partnerships and the need for governance, assurance, transparency </li></ul><ul><li>Information literacy in the community has become associated with better decision making, empowerment, choice, participation, governance, democracy </li></ul><ul><li>The need to cope with a rapidly changing environment – including information overload </li></ul>
  5. 5. Where are we now? <ul><li>Still dealing with challenges </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Institutional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capacity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Where are we now? <ul><li>Changing ideas about information literacy </li></ul><ul><li>The fact that our relationship with information is largely instinctive, unconscious and socially defined </li></ul><ul><li>It is not a discrete skills set; it is a culture; it is embedded in social contexts; it is defined by the physical and intellectual context </li></ul><ul><li>Learning is a ‘messy’, iterative and complex business – neat, linear models don’t resonate with the learner </li></ul><ul><li>People do not relate to the (library) language of information literacy, nor, the abstract models we tend to use </li></ul><ul><li>It is highly embedded in different contexts ... school, university, the workplace, the community </li></ul>
  7. 7. Where are we going? <ul><li>Realising the complexity of how people learn and learning about how to teach information literacy – informed learning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Innovative pedagogy e.g. team approach ‘travel chest’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Taking on board constructivist, cognitive, behavioural, sensory paradigms </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using games </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing diagnostics </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Using e-learning and online tutorials e.g. use of second life </li></ul></ul><ul><li>A shift to participative approaches to developing information literacy </li></ul>
  8. 8. Where are we going? <ul><li>Understanding the contextual nature of information literacy and the need to integrate IL into work habits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating environments that enable good information and knowledge management e.g. using Enterprise 2.0 Web2.0) to foster and develop IKM capabilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Government IKM skills framework </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>i-know OU workplace IL package </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Royal College of Nurses (RCN) research competencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Research Information Network (RIN) research competencies framework + SCONUL </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Beginning to focus on monitoring and evaluation e.g. diagnostic tool kits; levels (outcomes and impact) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Thank you for listening. Any questions?

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