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Design for Social Impact                    Sarah Malin                       GES Day              February 23, 2013
Goals for Our Session •Reveal how the built environment can be an empowering tool for behavior and social change. •Give a ...
Hello! What’s your name? What are you majoring in? What can’t you leave the house without? Why are you interested in this ...
What’s important to you?               …to me?                …to us?
“” Culturedenotes an historically transmitted pattern ofmeanings … a system of inheritedconceptions … by means of which me...
“Well, the water, to me, represents the earthand all the things that happen on the earth,reality. And the moonlight repres...
Values lead us.Our creations remind us.
Design forSocial Impact              Changing our       environment helps us          change behaviors.
We’re getting better at                  Empathy
But we also need more         Participation
The designed environment must bea symbol of intention,not a mandated constraint. It is a     Tool for   Empowerment
Through a process that brings Anthropology and design thinking into anarchitecture project schedule…
…we rigorously study and engage communities…
…create frameworks of behavior and experiential goals…
…and manifest these into a spatial concept.
Your turn.
How can we improve higher       education?
ReframeRather than the noun:   …use the verb: “higher education”      “learning”
How can we improve learning?
Group Discussion   What does “learning” mean?   What does learning look like?
How can we use the builtenvironment to better bring forth        this definition?
Reflect. What gets you out of bed in the morning? Where do you go to be inspired? Where do you go to be productive?
Analyze. How do you feel in this room? What does this room expect you to do? How does learning happen here? How does it co...
Reimagine. What is your ideal daily routine? What should the campus look like or involve to best support your ideal daily ...
Group 1•Dorms in the center, campus circulararound that core – “build around thehuman element”•Everything you need is on c...
Group 2•Centralized campus•Dorms arranged around an outdoorgathering area•“Dome” library  –Green space inside  –Open-air  ...
Group 3•Dynamic running trails•Personal transportation (i.e. segways)•Round tables to encourage groupgathering•Support “me...
Group 4•Outside:  –Outdoor hangout space  –More outdoor activities•Moving through:  –More transportation  –Easier transpor...
Sarah Malin1117 W. Dickens Ave, Apt 2     Chicago, IL 60614  sarahmalin@gmail.com      Sarahmalin.com      (914)400-5159
Insights•Participants recognized outdated design intentions and reflected on howthese are either irrelevant or create a ha...
GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact
GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact
GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact
GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact
GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact
GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact
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GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact

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GES Day 2013: Design for Social Impact

  1. 1. Design for Social Impact Sarah Malin GES Day February 23, 2013
  2. 2. Goals for Our Session •Reveal how the built environment can be an empowering tool for behavior and social change. •Give a brief summary of the Design for Social Impact movement. •Inspire you to be a critical thinker about your environment.
  3. 3. Hello! What’s your name? What are you majoring in? What can’t you leave the house without? Why are you interested in this topic?
  4. 4. What’s important to you? …to me? …to us?
  5. 5. “” Culturedenotes an historically transmitted pattern ofmeanings … a system of inheritedconceptions … by means of which mencommunicate, perpetuate, and develop theirknowledge about and attitudes toward life. –Clifford Geertz
  6. 6. “Well, the water, to me, represents the earthand all the things that happen on the earth,reality. And the moonlight represents ourdreams and our minds.”“And…”“And the reflection… well, I guess thereflection represents art. It’s what lies betweenour dreams and reality.” –An Object of Beauty, Steve Martin
  7. 7. Values lead us.Our creations remind us.
  8. 8. Design forSocial Impact Changing our environment helps us change behaviors.
  9. 9. We’re getting better at Empathy
  10. 10. But we also need more Participation
  11. 11. The designed environment must bea symbol of intention,not a mandated constraint. It is a Tool for Empowerment
  12. 12. Through a process that brings Anthropology and design thinking into anarchitecture project schedule…
  13. 13. …we rigorously study and engage communities…
  14. 14. …create frameworks of behavior and experiential goals…
  15. 15. …and manifest these into a spatial concept.
  16. 16. Your turn.
  17. 17. How can we improve higher education?
  18. 18. ReframeRather than the noun: …use the verb: “higher education” “learning”
  19. 19. How can we improve learning?
  20. 20. Group Discussion What does “learning” mean? What does learning look like?
  21. 21. How can we use the builtenvironment to better bring forth this definition?
  22. 22. Reflect. What gets you out of bed in the morning? Where do you go to be inspired? Where do you go to be productive?
  23. 23. Analyze. How do you feel in this room? What does this room expect you to do? How does learning happen here? How does it compare to the places where you are inspired and productive? Does this room facilitate what you defined as learning?
  24. 24. Reimagine. What is your ideal daily routine? What should the campus look like or involve to best support your ideal daily routine?
  25. 25. Group 1•Dorms in the center, campus circulararound that core – “build around thehuman element”•Everything you need is on campus•Food truck brings food throughout•“Really green” – landscapingeverywhere•“Combine inspiring places” –performance is located on the lake
  26. 26. Group 2•Centralized campus•Dorms arranged around an outdoorgathering area•“Dome” library –Green space inside –Open-air –Encourage breaks•Put amenities near the living area
  27. 27. Group 3•Dynamic running trails•Personal transportation (i.e. segways)•Round tables to encourage groupgathering•Support “me time”•Collaborative, comfortable classspaces
  28. 28. Group 4•Outside: –Outdoor hangout space –More outdoor activities•Moving through: –More transportation –Easier transportation –Functional walkways•Campus buildings: –Less of a north/south campus divide –Art inside and outside –Timeless, classic design –Transparency –Large areas and comfy furniture•Student center: –Central social place –Student ownership – displayed work –Tall ceilings
  29. 29. Sarah Malin1117 W. Dickens Ave, Apt 2 Chicago, IL 60614 sarahmalin@gmail.com Sarahmalin.com (914)400-5159
  30. 30. Insights•Participants recognized outdated design intentions and reflected on howthese are either irrelevant or create a harmful pattern –i.e. North/South campus divide originally a Methodist intention to separate fraternities from sororities but now creates an unfortunate divide across the campus –i.e. Coat hooks in the classroom are remnants from old behaviors that are no longer practiced•Design-wise, participants favored a centralized, student-centered campuswith plenty of social spaces and connections to nature.•Participants had different interpretations and opinions of the classroom –This shows us that design will never be universally good or bad. The physical environment can’t satisfy everyone and can’t keep up with the pace of societal change. Instead of striving for universality, we can empower users to critique their environment, change their surroundings, and feel free to act the way they need to in any context. This allows them to better communicate their needs and to help designers keep their environment relevant.

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