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The Respiratory System Lesson PowerPoint, Lungs, Anatomy and More

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This is the Respiratory System Lesson PowerPoint that is one small part of my Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. This lesson can be found at www.sciencepowerpoint.com and includes a bundled homework package, worksheets, lesson notes, games, and much more. An anti-tobacco and dangers of smoking PowerPoint is also included in this unit.

The Respiratory System Lesson PowerPoint, Lungs, Anatomy and More

  1. 1. • Larynx: The hollow muscular organ forming an air passage to the lungs and holding the vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. Human Body Unit Part VIII The Respiratory System
  3. 3. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  4. 4. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Kidneys Ureters Urinary Bladder Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6. • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. “Hoot, Hoot” “Good Luck!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  Area of Focus: The Respiratory System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • Activity! Learning to Breath “Yoga Intro” – Need space to sit and see the screen. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkFSIfvWO AQ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. Food CO2 O2 Waste Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. Food CO2 O2 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. Food CO2 O2 Waste Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. Food CO2 O2 Waste Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. Food CO2 O2 Waste Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. Food CO2 O2 Waste Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. Food CO2 O2 Waste The Respiratory system provides the cells in your body with oxygen and combines with food to produce energy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. Food CO2 O2 Waste The Respiratory system provides the cells in your body with oxygen and combines with food to produce energy. The respiratory system exchanges O2 for CO2 which is released as waste when you breath out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • The air around you is made up of mostly nitrogen (78%) and oxygen (21%). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • The air around you is made up of mostly nitrogen (78%) and oxygen (21%). Inert / Non-reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • The air around you is made up of mostly nitrogen (78%) and oxygen (21%). Inert / Non-reactive. Important for cell respiration Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Every minute you breath about this many liters of air. • A.) 600,000 • B.) 60,000 • C.) 6,000 • D.) 600 • E.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Every minute you breath about this many liters of air. • A.) 600,000 • B.) 60,000 • C.) 6,000 • D.) 600 • E.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • Every minute you breath about this many liters of air. • A.) 600,000 • B.) 60,000 • C.) 6,000 • D.) 600 • E.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. • The candle will continue to burn unless… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • The candle will continue to burn unless… • The candle is starved of oxygen and fuel. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • If a diver runs out of oxygen, their cells will slowly die. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • If a diver runs out of oxygen, their cells will slowly die. Our bodies are burning candles that constantly need oxygen to live. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • If a diver runs out of oxygen, their cells will slowly die. Our bodies are burning candles that constantly need oxygen to live. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • The energy releasing process is called cellular respiration. • 6O2+C6H12O6Release of Energy  6CO2 and 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Which of the following colors is the correct color for the respiration equation. • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6 CO2  6H2O • 6 CO2 + C6H12O6 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • C6H12O6 + 6CO2  6 CO2 + 6H2O + energy • 6 CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2  6O2 + 6H2O • Glucose is created using respiration + Carbon Dioxide. • C6H12O6 + 6O2  6CO2 + 6H2O + energy • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6CO2  6H2O + C6H12O6 • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy  More energy + 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Which of the following colors is the correct color for the respiration equation. • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6 CO2  6H2O • 6 CO2 + C6H12O6 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • C6H12O6 + 6CO2  6 CO2 + 6H2O + energy • 6 CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2  6O2 + 6H2O • Glucose is created using respiration + Carbon Dioxide. • C6H12O6 + 6O2  6CO2 + 6H2O + energy • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6CO2  6H2O + C6H12O6 • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy  More energy + 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • Which of the following colors is the correct color for the respiration equation. • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6 CO2  6H2O • 6 CO2 + C6H12O6 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • C6H12O6 + 6O2  6 CO2 + 6H2O + energy • 6 CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2  6O2 + 6H2O • Glucose is created using respiration + Carbon Dioxide. • CH12O6 + 6CO2  6CO2 + 62O + energy • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6CO2  6H2O + C6H12O6 • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy  More energy + 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Which of the following colors is the correct color for the respiration equation. • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6 CO2  6H2O • 6 CO2 + C6H12O6 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • C6H12O6 + 6O2  6 CO2 + 6H2O + energy • 6 CO2 + 6H2O C6H12O6 + 6O2  6O2 + 6H2O • Glucose is created using respiration + Carbon Dioxide. • CH12O6 + 6CO2  6CO2 + 62O + energy • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy • 6 CO2  6H2O + energy  6CO2  6H2O + C6H12O6 • 6CO2 + 6O2  6H2O + energy  More energy + 6H2O Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55.  Respiratory System: System responsible for supplying oxygen to the body and removing carbon dioxide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56.  Respiratory System: System responsible for supplying oxygen to the body and removing carbon dioxide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. Dust Pollen Particulates Bacteria Viruses Spores
  58. 58. Dust Pollen Particulates Bacteria Viruses Spores Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. Dust Pollen Particulates Bacteria Viruses Spores
  60. 60. Dust Pollen Particulates Bacteria Viruses Spores Mucous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Your nose produces close to a liter of mucous a day. – Most gets swept into the esophagus by tiny hairs called cilia in your nasal cavity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Your nose produces close to a liter of mucous a day. – Most gets swept into the esophagus by tiny hairs called cilia in your nasal cavity. Esophagus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Your nose produces close to a liter of mucous a day. – Most gets swept into the esophagus by tiny hairs called cilia in your nasal cavity. Esophagus Nose Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. Trapped in the Mucous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. Cool Dry winter Air
  67. 67. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. Particles trapped in mucous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. Warm Moist Mucous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. Warm Moist Mucous Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. Warm Moist Mucous To Nasal Cavity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. Blood Vessels in Nasal Cavity
  77. 77. Blood Vessels in Nasal Cavity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. Blood Vessels in Nasal Cavity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • The Nose – Filters Particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • The Nose – Filters Particles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • The Nose – Filters Particles. – Moistens the Air. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • The Nose – Filters Particles. – Moistens the Air. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • The Nose – Filters Particles. – Moistens the Air. – Warms the Air. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • The Nose – Filters Particles. – Moistens the Air. – Warms the Air. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Activity! Try and swallow and breath at the same time? – Could you do it? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Activity! Try and swallow and breath at the same time? – Could you do it? No, because your epiglottis closed during the swallowing reflex. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. • Activity! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • Activity! – Open your mouth and breath through your nose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. • Activity! – Open your mouth and breath through your nose. – Pinch your nose shut while you are breathing. – What happened? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. • Activity! – Open your mouth and breath through your nose. – Pinch your nose shut while you are breathing. – What happened? Your air is quickly shut off. Your epiglottis closed ensuring that only air is going to your lungs (Protection). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • Drowning is death from asphyxia due to suffocation caused by a liquid entering the lungs and preventing the absorption of oxygen. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • Drowning is death from asphyxia due to suffocation caused by a liquid entering the lungs and preventing the absorption of oxygen. – Leads to a lack of oxygen to the brain. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93.  Epiglottis: A flap of cartilage at the roof of the tongue, which is depressed during swallowing to cover the opening of the windpipe. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. Epiglottis
  95. 95. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs
  96. 96. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  97. 97. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  98. 98. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  99. 99. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  100. 100. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  101. 101. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  102. 102. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  103. 103. Epiglottis Trachea to Lungs Esophagus to stomach
  104. 104. • Video! Epiglottis and Swallowing. • (11 seconds) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aPMw7acr Vro Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  105. 105. • Which letter is the epiglottis?
  106. 106. • Which letter is the epiglottis?
  107. 107. • Which letter is the epiglottis? Learn more about the epiglottis at… http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap/respiratorysystem/larynx/epiglotti s/tutorial.html
  108. 108. Larynx and vocal cords.
  109. 109. Males have a larger Larynx than females.
  110. 110.  Larynx: The hollow muscular organ forming an air passage to the lungs and holding the vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111.  Larynx: The hollow muscular organ forming an air passage to the lungs and holding the vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112.  Larynx: The hollow muscular organ forming an air passage to the lungs and holding the vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. • Sound is a mechanical wave transmitted within the range of hearing. Nervous System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114. • Sound is a mechanical wave transmitted within the range of hearing. Nervous System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • Sound is a mechanical wave transmitted within the range of hearing. – Can travel through a solid, liquid, gas Nervous System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116. • Sound is a mechanical wave transmitted within the range of hearing. – Can travel through a solid, liquid, gas – It can be reflected, refracted, attenuated – (gradual loss). Nervous System Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117. • Video Link! The Vocal Cords in Action. – Muscles controlling the vocal cords. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYpDwhpIL kQ&feature=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • Sound is produced by the muscles of the larynx, airflow, space, and the articulators (tongue, teeth, palate, lips).
  119. 119. • Sound is produced by the muscles of the larynx, airflow, space, and the articulators (tongue, teeth, palate, lips). • As airflow passes over them, they all interact with each other to produce sound. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • Sound is produced by the muscles of the larynx, airflow, space, and the articulators (tongue, teeth, palate, lips). • As airflow passes over them, they all interact with each other to produce sound. – Cords are brought together to produce sound. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • Sound is produced by the muscles of the larynx, airflow, space, and the articulators (tongue, teeth, palate, lips). • As airflow passes over them, they all interact with each other to produce sound. – Cords are brought together to produce sound. – Covered with mucous (Drink lots of water) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • Sound is produced by the muscles of the larynx, airflow, space, and the articulators (tongue, teeth, palate, lips). • As airflow passes over them, they all interact with each other to produce sound. – Cords are brought together to produce sound. – Covered with mucous (Drink lots of water) – Should vibrate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Sound is produced by the muscles of the larynx, airflow, space, and the articulators (tongue, teeth, palate, lips). • As airflow passes over them, they all interact with each other to produce sound. – Cords are brought together to produce sound. – Covered with mucous (Drink lots of water) – Should vibrate. – Space – Relax your muscles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. The size of the larynx and length of the vocal cords determines pitch.
  125. 125. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. • The size of the larynx and length of the vocal cords determines pitch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. • The size of the larynx and length of the vocal cords determines pitch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128. • The size of the larynx and length of the vocal cords determines pitch. Females have a higher pitch because they have shorter vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. • The size of the larynx and length of the vocal cords determines pitch. Females have a higher pitch because they have shorter vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  130. 130. • The size of the larynx and length of the vocal cords determines pitch. Females have a higher pitch because they have shorter vocal cords. Males have a deeper voice because they have larger vocal cords. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • Boys and girls vocal cords are the same size until a boys teenage years where the cords grow and his voice changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132. • Boys and girls vocal cords are the same size until a boys teenage years where the cords grow and his voice changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. Larynx and vocal cords.
  134. 134. • Video Karaoke! Sing-A-Long to get the vocal cords working. (A few minutes ) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9J41NumARDQ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. • Activity Link! Phenomenon of Sound – http://www.discoveryeducation.com/teachers/f ree-lesson-plans/the-phenomenon-of-sound- waves.cfm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. Trachea
  137. 137. • Activity! Run your fingers up and down along the front of your neck to feel for the trachea. – It would feel like a vacuum cleaner hose. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138.  Trachea: Tube in your throat that carries air to your lungs (windpipe) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139.  Trachea: Tube in your throat that carries air to your lungs (windpipe)  Cartilage rings Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. • Why would these rings be made of cartilage? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • Why would these rings be made of cartilage? – Answer: The cartilage rings are flexible enough so you can bend your neck, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • Why would these rings be made of cartilage? – Answer: The cartilage rings are flexible enough so you can bend your neck, but at the same time they keep the air passage open. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • Why would these rings be made of cartilage? – Answer: The cartilage rings are flexible enough so you can bend your neck, but at the same time they keep the air passage open. Flexible and stays open, much like trachea Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • Why would these rings be made of cartilage? – Answer: The cartilage rings are flexible enough so you can bend your neck, but at the same time they keep the air passage open. Flexible and stays open, much like trachea Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • Why would these rings be made of cartilage? – Answer: The cartilage rings are flexible enough so you can bend your neck, but at the same time they keep the air passage open. Flexible and stays open, much like trachea Not flexible
  146. 146. • The trachea has little cilia that move any particles missed in the nasal cavity up toward the esophagus for disposal to the stomach. Esophagus Lungs Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • Mucous Esophagus Lungs
  148. 148. Esophagus Lungs
  149. 149. • When a build-up of particles in the trachea occurs… Esophagus Lungs
  150. 150. Lungs
  151. 151. Lungs
  152. 152. Lungs
  153. 153. Lungs
  154. 154. Lungs
  155. 155. Lungs
  156. 156. Lungs
  157. 157. What’s left. Lungs
  158. 158. What’s left. Lungs
  159. 159. Lungs
  160. 160. Lungs
  161. 161. Lungs
  162. 162. Lungs
  163. 163. To Esophagus Lungs
  164. 164. To Esophagus Lungs
  165. 165. Why we cough? Learn more at… http://www.webmd.com/cold-and-flu/tc/coughs-topic-overview
  166. 166. The Bronchus
  167. 167.  Bronchus: Airway in the respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168.  Bronchus: Airway in the respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. Right Bronchi Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169.  Bronchus: Airway in the respiratory tract that conducts air into the lungs. Right Bronchi Left Bronchi Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171.  Lungs: Either of two saclike respiratory organs in the chest of vertebrates; serves to remove carbon dioxide and provide oxygen to the blood. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172.  Lungs: Either of two saclike respiratory organs in the chest of vertebrates; serves to remove carbon dioxide and provide oxygen to the blood. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173.  Alveoli: Any of the many tiny air sacs in the lungs where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174.  Alveoli: Any of the many tiny air sacs in the lungs where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Carbon Dioxide Out
  175. 175.  Alveoli: Any of the many tiny air sacs in the lungs where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Carbon Dioxide Out Oxygen In
  176. 176.  Alveoli: Any of the many tiny air sacs in the lungs where the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide takes place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Carbon Dioxide Out Oxygen In Learn more about the alveolus at… http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/media/107200/The-alveoli- and-capillaries-in-the-lungs-exchange-oxygen-for
  177. 177. • How many Alveoli do you have in your lungs? • A.) 600,000,000 • B.) 600,000 • C.) 60,000 • D.) 6,000 • E.) 60 • F.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • How many Alveoli do you have in your lungs? • A.) 600,000,000 • B.) 600,000 • C.) 60,000 • D.) 6,000 • E.) 60 • F.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • How many Alveoli do you have in your lungs? • A.) 600,000,000 • B.) 600,000 • C.) 60,000 • D.) 6,000 • E.) 60 • F.) 6 You need a lot of them to get oxygen to your blood and remove Carbon Dioxide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • How many Alveoli do you have in your lungs? • A.) 600,000,000 • B.) 600,000 • C.) 60,000 • D.) 6,000 • E.) 60 • F.) 6 A.) 600,000,000 B.) 600,000 C.) 60,000 D.) 6,000 E.) 60 F.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • How many Alveoli do you have in your lungs? • A.) 600,000,000 • B.) 600,000 • C.) 60,000 • D.) 6,000 • E.) 60 • F.) 6 A.) 600,000,000 B.) 600,000 C.) 60,000 D.) 6,000 E.) 60 F.) 6 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. Cigarette smoke coats your alveoli with tar. This make gas exchange through the membranes difficult. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Asthma: Breathing disorder that causes tightening of the muscles around the airways and swelling / inflammation of those airways. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Asthma: Constriction / the tightening of the muscles surrounding the airways, and inflammation, the swelling and irritation of the airways Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Asthma: Constriction / the tightening of the muscles surrounding the airways, and inflammation, the swelling and irritation of the airways Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Asthma: Constriction / the tightening of the muscles surrounding the airways, and inflammation, the swelling and irritation of the airways Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about asthma at… http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/asthma/
  188. 188.  Diaphragm: Dome shaped muscle and membranous partition that separates the abdominal and thoracic cavities. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189.  Diaphragm: Dome shaped muscle and membranous partition that separates the abdominal and thoracic cavities.  Serves as a major muscle aiding inhalation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190.  Diaphragm: Dome shaped muscle and membranous partition that separates the abdominal and thoracic cavities.  Serves as a major muscle aiding inhalation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191.  Diaphragm: Dome shaped muscle and membranous partition that separates the abdominal and thoracic cavities.  Serves as a major muscle aiding inhalation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192.  Diaphragm: Dome shaped muscle and membranous partition that separates the abdominal and thoracic cavities.  Serves as a major muscle aiding inhalation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • As you inhale, your diaphragm flattens out allowing your chest to expand and allows more air to flow into your lungs. – Air pressure decrease, air then rushes into your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • As you inhale, your diaphragm flattens out allowing your chest to expand and allows more air to flow into your lungs. – Air pressure decrease, air then rushes into your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • As you exhale, your diaphragm relaxes to a normal state. Space in chest decreases. – Air pressure increases, air then rushes out of your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • As you exhale, your diaphragm relaxes to a normal state. Space in chest decreases. – Air pressure increases, air then rushes out of your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? • Inhale A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? • Inhale A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? • Inhale Exhale A B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  203. 203. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? A BA B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  204. 204. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? A BA B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? • Inhale A BA B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? • Inhale A BA B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Which is an inhale, and which is an exhale? • Inhale Exhale A BA B Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. • When your diaphragm becomes irritated it spasms and pulls air through your vocal cords and into your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • When your diaphragm becomes irritated it spasms and pulls air through your vocal cords and into your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  212. 212. • When your diaphragm becomes irritated it spasms and pulls air through your vocal cords and into your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  213. 213. • When your diaphragm becomes irritated it spasms and pulls air through your vocal cords and into your lungs. – (Eating too quickly, irritation in throat / stomach, nervousness / excitement) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214. • When your diaphragm becomes irritated it spasms and pulls air through your vocal cords and into your lungs. – (Eating too quickly, irritation in throat / stomach, nervousness / excitement) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about hiccups at… http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/181573.php
  215. 215. • Lung Capacity Available Sheet
  216. 216. • Activity! Lung Capacity • Please use a ruler to create the spreadsheet on the next page neatly into your journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. Tidal Volume Vital Capacity Diameter Volume Diameter Volume Trials 1 2 3 Average Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. Tidal Volume Vital Capacity Diameter Volume Diameter Volume Trials 1 2 3 Average Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. • Tidal Volume: The amount of air that you move in and out of your lungs under normal breathing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220. • Tidal Volume: The amount of air that you move in and out of your lungs under normal breathing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • Tidal Volume: The amount of air that you move in and out of your lungs under normal breathing. • Vital Capacity: The maximum amount of air that can be moved in and out of your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • Tidal Volume: The amount of air that you move in and out of your lungs under normal breathing. • Vital Capacity: The maximum amount of air that can be moved in and out of your lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. • Tidal Volume: – Prep balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale normally (NORMAL) and then exhale normally and fill the balloon. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  225. 225. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Repeat process three times recording height on your spreadsheet. Find the average / mean by adding up all the numbers in a category, then divide by how many numbers there are in that category. Ex.  10cm + 8cm + 6 cm = 24cm / 3 = 8 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  226. 226. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Repeat process three times recording height on your spreadsheet. Find the average / mean by adding up all the numbers in a category, then divide by how many numbers there are in that category. Ex.  10cm + 8cm + 6 cm = 24cm / 3 = 8 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Repeat process three times recording height on your spreadsheet. Find the average / mean by adding up all the numbers in a category, then divide by how many numbers there are in that category. Ex.  10cm + 8cm + 6 cm = 24cm / 3 = 8 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Repeat process three times recording height on your spreadsheet. Find the average / mean by adding up all the numbers in a category, then divide by how many numbers there are in that category. Ex.  10cm + 8cm + 6 cm = 24cm / 3 = 8 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Repeat process three times recording height on your spreadsheet. Find the average / mean by adding up all the numbers in a category, then divide by how many numbers there are in that category. Ex.  10cm + 8cm + 6 cm = 24cm / 3 = 8 cm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  230. 230. • Vital Capacity: – Prep new balloon by stretching it out. – Inhale as much as you can in one breath, and then exhale into the balloon as much as you can in one breath. – Pinch balloon in hands and measure diameter in centimeters. Repeat process three times recording height on your spreadsheet. Find the average / mean by adding up all the numbers in a category, then divide by how many numbers there are in that category. Ex.  10cm + 8cm + 6 cm = 24cm / 3 = 8 cm Vital Capacity Average Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  231. 231. • Convert Diameter to volume using this graph. Example on next slide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232. • Convert Diameter to volume using this graph. Example on next slide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233. • Convert Diameter to volume using this graph. Example on next slide. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  234. 234. • Convert Diameter to volume using this graph. Example on next slide. 4300 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  235. 235. • Convert Diameter to volume using this graph. Example on next slide. 4300 Answer is in cm3 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236. • A person's lungs is proportional to the surface area of his or her body. – Find your surface area (SA) using a body surface area calculator. • http://www- users.med.cornell.edu/~spon/picu/calc/bsacalc.htm – Find your vital capacity • Males: SA x 2500 • Females SA x 2000 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  237. 237. • Questions? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238. • Questions? • Why didn’t we just blow the balloon up once and take that number? • Compare your data to three other members of the class. – Describe how you compare to them? Why? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  239. 239. • Questions? • Why didn’t we just blow the balloon up once and take that number? • Compare your data to three other members of the class. – Describe how you compare to them? Why? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240. • Questions? • Why didn’t we just blow the balloon up once and take that number? • Compare your data to three other members of the class. – Describe how you compare to them? Why? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  241. 241. • Questions? • Why didn’t we just blow the balloon up once and take that number? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242. • Questions? • Why didn’t we just blow the balloon up once and take that number? • Blowing up the balloon many times and finding an average gave us more accurate results than just doing the experiment once. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243. • Questions? • Compare your data to three other members of the class. – Describe how you compare to them? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • Questions? • Compare your data to three other members of the class. – Describe how you compare to them? Why? • Students who are larger and taller should have a larger lung capacity and therefore larger tidal and vital capacity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • Questions? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? • An athletes vital capacity should be the same to non-athletes. They are more fit because their body is producing more red blood cells that absorb oxygen. Remember lung capacity and a persons size are proportional. A smoker may just have difficulty breathing Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • Questions? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? • An athletes vital capacity should be the same as non-athletes. They are more fit because their body is producing more red blood cells that absorb oxygen. Remember lung capacity and a persons size are proportional. A smoker may just have difficulty breathing Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • Questions? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? • An athletes vital capacity should be the same as non-athletes. They are more fit because their body is producing more red blood cells that absorb oxygen. Remember lung capacity and a persons size are proportional. A smoker may just have difficulty breathing Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. • Questions? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? • An athletes vital capacity should be the same as non-athletes. They are more fit because their body is producing more red blood cells that absorb oxygen. Remember lung capacity and a persons size are proportional. A smoker may just have difficulty breathing Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. • Questions? • How might an athlete's vital capacity compare to a non-athlete / smoker? – Explain your reasoning? • An athletes vital capacity should be the same as non-athletes. They are more fit because their body is producing more red blood cells that absorb oxygen. Remember lung capacity and a persons size are proportional. A smoker may just have difficulty breathing because their alveoli are covered in tar. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250. • Activity! (Optional) Making a spirometer. • http://peer.tamu.edu/curriculum_modules/ OrganSystems/module_4/activity1.htm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  251. 251. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252. • Changes in the respiratory system (caused from the nervous system) are often used to determine if people are lying when they take a polygraph. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253. • Changes in the respiratory system (caused from the nervous system) are often used to determine if people are lying when they take a polygraph. – Blood pressure – Breathing may increase. – Sweat may increase Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  254. 254. • Activity! (Optional) Lie Detector – Teacher puts a plate of candy in the middle of the classroom. (Everyone will get one at end). – Teacher turns around. – Students secretly sneak up to the candy dish and steal one by putting it in their pocket or not stealing and placing it back. • We need roughly 50/50 so everyone shouldn’t take. – Teacher will then call several members up to the front of the class to answer questions. Everyone look for changes in their breathing / respiratory system / and increase in sweating / behaviors. – Will the teacher / examiner be able to tell? – Student will reveal to the class after the teacher makes the decision if they were lying or not. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255. • Questions? • Are you in you class right now? • Do you live in the United States of America? • Are you a student at this school? • Is your hair black? • Are you current on your homework? • Are you wearing a blue shirt right now? • Did you take a piece of candy from the dish? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256. • Activity! Please label the parts of the respiratory system in your resource book. – http://www.getbodysmart.com/ap2/systems/tut orial.html Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Nice review of the respiratory system. Learn more at… http://www.virtualmedicalcentre.com/anatomy/respiratory- system/18
  257. 257. • Try to guess the mystery picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  258. 258. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Try to guess the mystery picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • Try to guess the mystery picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263. • You should be close to page 19 in your bundle.

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