Periodic Table of the Elements Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Atoms and Periodic Table of the Elements unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 2000+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 15 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: -Atoms (Atomic Force Microscopes), Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Cathode Tube, Atoms, Fundamental Particles, The Nucleus, Isotopes, AMU, Size of Atoms and Particles, Quarks, Recipe of the Universe, Atomic Theory, Atomic Symbols, #'s, Valence Electrons, Octet Rule, SPONCH Atoms, Molecules, Hydrocarbons (Structure), Alcohols (Structure), Proteins (Structure), Periodic Table of the Elements, Organization of Periodic Table, Transition Metals, Electron Negativity, Non-Metals, Metals, Metalloids, Atomic Bonds, Ionic Bonds, Covalent Bonds, Metallic Bonds, Ionization, and much more.

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

Periodic Table of the Elements Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Also needs one electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indents when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics - -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Label please. Neutron Proton Electron
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • Activity! (Optional) Arranging the Giant Periodic Table of the Elements from last years class. – Try to do without the periodic table. – Bring your periodic table just in case. – You will be timed and compared at the end of the unit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6. • Activity Sheet Available: Meet the Elements. A Nice Review.
  7. 7.  New Area of Focus: Periodic Table of the Elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  New Area of Focus: Periodic Table of the Elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. • Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. – Made cards of the elements and then began placing them in logical orders. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. – Made cards of the elements and then began placing them in logical orders. – Described elements according to both atomic weight and valence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. • Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. – Made cards of the elements and then began placing them in logical orders. – Described elements according to both atomic weight and valence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy He used his early periodic table to make bold predictions of unknown elements.
  13. 13. • Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. – Made cards of the elements and then began placing them in logical orders. – Described elements according to both atomic weight and valence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy He used his early periodic table to make bold predictions of unknown elements. When germanium, gallium and scandium were found they fit perfectly into his periodic table.
  14. 14. • Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. – Made cards of the elements and then began placing them in logical orders. – Described elements according to both atomic weight and valence. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy He used his early periodic table to make bold predictions of unknown elements. When germanium, gallium and scandium were found they fit perfectly into his periodic table. Biography. Learn more at… http://www.famousscientists.org /dmitri-mendeleev/
  15. 15. • British chemist Henry Moseley in 1913. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • British chemist Henry Moseley in 1913. – He proposed that the atom contains in its nucleus a number of positive nuclear charges that is equal to its (atomic) number in the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • British chemist Henry Moseley in 1913. – He proposed that the atom contains in its nucleus a number of positive nuclear charges that is equal to its (atomic) number in the periodic table. – This helped reorganize the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • British chemist Henry Moseley in 1913. – He proposed that the atom contains in its nucleus a number of positive nuclear charges that is equal to its (atomic) number in the periodic table. – This helped reorganize the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Enlisted with the British Army and was killed August 1914, by sniper in World War I.
  19. 19. • British chemist Henry Moseley in 1913. – He proposed that the atom contains in its nucleus a number of positive nuclear charges that is equal to its (atomic) number in the periodic table. – This helped reorganize the periodic table. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Enlisted with the British Army and was killed August 1914, by sniper in World War I. Learn more at…… http://www.famousscientists.org/henry-moseley/
  20. 20. • Activity! – Your table group is going to get a group of cards. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Activity! – Your table group is going to get a group of cards. – Each table one at a time will lay down the cards in a logical order. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Activity! – Your table group is going to get a group of cards. – Each table one at a time will lay down the cards in a logical order. Think Dimitri Mendeleev and organizing according to valence and atomic mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • Questions – Which were missing? How do you know? – How is the periodic table similar to the arrangements of cards? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. • Questions – Which were missing? How do you know? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Questions – Which were missing? How do you know? – 5, J, 2, 6, 7, 7, J, 3 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. • Questions – How is the periodic table similar to the arrangements of cards? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Answer! – The Periodic Table increases in amu from left to right. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Answer! – The Periodic Table increases in amu from left to right. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Answer! – The Periodic Table increases in amu from left to right. – Groups show the same number of valence E- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Answer! – The Periodic Table increases in amu from left to right. – Groups show the same number of valence E- Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Who are these two scientists and what did they do? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Who are these two scientists and what did they do? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Who are these two scientists and what did they do? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Henry Moseley helped reorganize the periodic table according to atomic number.
  44. 44. • Who are these two scientists and what did they do? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Henry Moseley helped reorganize the periodic table according to atomic number.
  45. 45. • Who are these two scientists and what did they do? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Dimitri Mendeleev, the father of The Periodic Table of the Elements. Henry Moseley helped reorganize the periodic table according to atomic number.
  46. 46.  The Periodic Table of the Elements is a…  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47.  A chart of all the known elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48.  Is in order of increasing atomic number and mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49.  Is in order of increasing atomic number and mass. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Atomic Mass and Atomic Number increases as you move across and down. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51.  The table puts elements into groups with similar characteristics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52.  The table puts elements into groups with similar characteristics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53.  Allows us to recognize trends over the whole array of elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • The periodic table can also be used as a way to write love letters in class.
  55. 55. • The periodic table can also be used as a way to write love letters in class.
  56. 56. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy One orbital
  60. 60. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy One orbital Valence Electrons
  61. 61. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Two Orbitals
  64. 64. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Three Orbitals
  67. 67. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Four Orbitals
  70. 70. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Five Orbitals
  73. 73. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Six Orbital
  76. 76. • All of the elements in a period have the same number of atomic orbitals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • – It is grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It is grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Also needs one electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Also needs one electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Also needs one electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Also needs one electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. • Hydrogen is an odd ball. – It’s grouped with the alkali metals because it has a similar outer shell electron configuration as they do. It’s not metal? Also needs one electron. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. • How are Nitrogen and Phosphorus similar? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. • How are Nitrogen and Phosphorus similar? – They both have 5 electrons in their outermost shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • How are Boron and Gallium similar? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • How are Boron and Gallium similar? – They both have 3 electrons in their outermost shell. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. • How are Boron and Gallium similar? – They both have 3 electrons in their outermost shell. – The Boron Family Group (13 group) have ns2np1 in their outer shell Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • How are Boron and Gallium similar? – They both have 3 electrons in their outermost shell. – The Boron Family Group (13 group) have ns2np1 in their outer shell Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy I prefer the standard Periodic Table, however, new periodic tables have found creative ways to arrange the elements.
  96. 96. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • Quiz! – Memorize the first 10 elements and their order from 1-10 in 7 minutes on The Periodic Table of Elements. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Video Song to help memorize the first ten elements. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OqtgPcAS GVI
  99. 99. • Please say the remaining 100 elements in 1 minute and 25 seconds. – Less than Tom Lehrers. – You get to use your table…1 minute to practice and your time starts now! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • Video song! Tom Lehrers (1:25 seconds) • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYW50 F42ss8
  101. 101. • Video song! Tom Lehrers • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHUo 0lG8Gi0
  102. 102. • Interactive Periodic Table of the Elements • http://www.ptable.com/
  103. 103.  Horizontal row is called Period Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  104. 104.  Horizontal row is called Period  (Same # of electron orbitals) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  105. 105.  Horizontal row is called Period  (Same # of electron orbitals)  Vertical column is called group/family. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106.  Horizontal row is called Period  (Same # of electron orbitals)  Vertical column is called group/family.  (Same # of valence electrons) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. • Is the circled area a period or group on the periodic table? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Is the circled area a period or group on the periodic table? Answer: Group Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Is the circled area a period or group on the periodic table? Answer: Group Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Is the circled area a period or group on the periodic table? Answer: Group Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr G R O U P Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr PERIOD 
  113. 113.  AMU increases from left to right and top to bottom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114.  AMU increases from left to right and top to bottom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr AMU increases as you go from left to right, and from top to bottom Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116.  Electronegativity increases from lower left to upper right. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117.  Electronegativity increases from lower left to upper right. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Moving top to bottom down the periodic table, electronegativity decreases.
  118. 118. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note: Noble gases are missing.
  120. 120. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I want electrons.”
  123. 123. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). • The least electronegative element is Francium (Fr). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). • The least electronegative element is Francium (Fr). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I want to give away one electron.”
  125. 125. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). • The least electronegative element is Francium (Fr). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I want to give away one electron.” “I want to gain one electron”
  126. 126. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). • The least electronegative element is Francium (Fr). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I want to give away one electron.” “I want to gain one electron”
  127. 127. • The most strongly electronegative element, Fluorine (F). • The least electronegative element is Francium (Fr). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “I want to give away one electron.” “I want to gain one electron” “You guys should get together.”
  128. 128. • Electronegativity is a measure of the attraction of an atom for the electrons in a chemical bond. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  129. 129. • Electronegativity is a measure of the attraction of an atom for the electrons in a chemical bond. – The higher the electronegativity of an atom, the greater its attraction for bonding electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  130. 130. • Electronegativity is a measure of the attraction of an atom for the electrons in a chemical bond. – The higher the electronegativity of an atom, the greater its attraction for bonding electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Those elements attract electrons like wicked.”
  131. 131. • Electronegativity is a measure of the attraction of an atom for the electrons in a chemical bond. – The higher the electronegativity of an atom, the greater its attraction for bonding electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Not the Noble Gases however.”
  132. 132. • Electronegativity is a measure of the attraction of an atom for the electrons in a chemical bond. – The higher the electronegativity of an atom, the greater its attraction for bonding electrons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Not the Noble Gases however.” “They’re wicked different.”
  133. 133. – Electrons with low ionization energies have a low electronegativity because their nuclei do not exert a strong attractive force on electrons. – Elements with high ionization energies have a high electronegativity due to the strong pull exerted on electrons by the nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy and Ions)Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron. (Gases and Ions)
  134. 134. – Electrons with low ionization energies have a low electronegativity because their nuclei do not exert a strong attractive force on electrons. – Elements with high ionization energies have a high electronegativity due to the strong pull exerted on electrons by the nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy and Ions)Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron. (Gases and Ions)
  135. 135. – Electrons with low ionization energies have a low electronegativity because their nuclei do not exert a strong attractive force on electrons. – Elements with high ionization energies have a high electronegativity due to the strong pull exerted on electrons by the nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy and Ions)Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron. (Gases and Ions)
  136. 136. – Electrons with low ionization energies have a low electronegativity because their nuclei do not exert a strong attractive force on electrons. – Elements with high ionization energies have a high electronegativity due to the strong pull exerted on electrons by the nucleus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy and Ions)Ionization energy is the energy required to remove an electron. (Gases and Ions)
  137. 137.  Transition Metals are found in the middle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Key: Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139.  Transition Metals are…  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140.  Malleable: To be shaped / made into sheets. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Wrap coin in foil limiting creases a press from above onto foil to make imprint. – Cut foil around quarter using scissors. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency. Indium used here instead of aluminum foil
  142. 142. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Wrap coin in foil limiting creases a press from above onto foil to make imprint. – Cut foil around quarter using scissors. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency. Indium used here instead of aluminum foil
  143. 143. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Make many imprints of he coin in the very malleable aluminum foil. • Can use journal to press the foil around coins. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency.
  144. 144. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Make many imprints of he coin in the very malleable aluminum foil. • Can use journal to press the foil around coins. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency.
  145. 145. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Make many imprints of he coin in the very malleable aluminum foil. • Can use journal to press the foil around coins. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency.
  146. 146. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Make many imprints of he coin in the very malleable aluminum foil. • Can use journal to press the foil around coins. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency.
  147. 147. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Make many imprints of he coin in the very malleable aluminum foil. • Can use journal to press the foil around coins. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency.
  148. 148. • Activity! Counterfeiting Coins. – Not really, but don’t tell the feds about today. – Everyone is loaned one quarter and given a small piece of heavy duty aluminum foil. – Make many imprints of he coin in the very malleable aluminum foil. • Can use journal to press the foil around coins. – Hand quarter back to teacher and don’t use quarter imprint as any form of currency.
  149. 149.  Ductile: Made into wire.
  150. 150. • Video Link! Picking a lock with a paperclip. – (Very Optional) For future lock smiths out there. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZTtuXkrXjc
  151. 151. • Video Link! Attaching two paperclips together with a dollar bill. – Teacher loans the bills and paperclips. – Watch video and perform in real time. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vic6CjUv32M
  152. 152. • Video Link! Attaching two paperclips together with a dollar bill. – Teacher loans the bills and paperclips. – Watch video and perform in real time. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vic6CjUv32M
  153. 153. • Video Link! Attaching two paperclips together with a dollar bill. – Teacher loans the bills and paperclips. – Watch video and perform in real time. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vic6CjUv32M
  154. 154. • Video Link! Attaching two paperclips together with a dollar bill. – Teacher loans the bills and paperclips. – Watch video and perform in real time. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vic6CjUv32M
  155. 155.  Good conductors of electricity. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Copper (Cu) is a good conductor of electricity. – It is malleable and ductile. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Activity! Find something that is a good conductor of electricity. – Test with the conductivity meter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158.  Have a high luster (shine). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159.  Have a high luster (shine). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160.  Have a high luster (shine). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161.  Conducts heat well. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162.  Conducts heat well. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163.  Conducts heat well. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164.  Most have a high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165.  Most have a high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166.  Most have a high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167.  Most have a high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168.  Most have a high density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169.  Most are solid.  Hg (mercury is a liquid metal) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170.  Most are solid.  Hg (mercury is a liquid metal) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171.  Most are solid.  Hg (mercury is a liquid metal) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172.  Most are solid.  Hg (mercury is a liquid metal) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • Field Trip! Let’s check out some mercury and see why it is used the way it is? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Thermostats with Mercury: – Since mercury is a liquid it travels downhill. – When the dial is turned on, the mercury travels down and connects wires telling the heater to turn on. – When thermostat is turned off, the connection is broken. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175.  Metallically bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176.  Metallically bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177.  Metallically bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178.  Many metals are reactive to chemicals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179.  Many metals are reactive to chemicals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180.  Many metals are reactive to chemicals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181.  Almost 75% of all elements are classified as metals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182.  Almost 75% of all elements are classified as metals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183.  Almost 75% of all elements are classified as metals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184.  Alloys: Metals are easily combined Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Bronze age: Copper and tin Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Continued Metals… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Some of the metals. Use your table…. – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  203. 203. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  204. 204. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  205. 205. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QiQoMDZGCs4
  206. 206. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  207. 207. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  208. 208. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  209. 209. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  210. 210. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  211. 211. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, Rare Metals, Rare-Earth Metals, and Transition Metals
  212. 212. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, and Transition Metals.
  213. 213. • Some of the metals – Actinide Metals, Lanthanide Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline-Earth Metals, Noble Metals, and Transition Metals.
  214. 214. • Demonstration! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215. • Demonstration! – Thermite Reaction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Demonstration! – Thermite Reaction – The Aluminum reduces the oxide of another metal, most commonly iron oxide, because aluminum is highly combustible: Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. • Demonstration! – Thermite Reaction – The Aluminum reduces the oxide of another metal, most commonly iron oxide, because aluminum is highly combustible: • Fe2O3 + 2Al → 2 Fe + Al2O3 + heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • Demonstration! – Thermite Reaction – The Aluminum reduces the oxide of another metal, most commonly iron oxide, because aluminum is highly combustible: • Fe2O3 + 2Al → 2 Fe + Al2O3 + heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. • Demonstration! – Thermite Reaction – The Aluminum reduces the oxide of another metal, most commonly iron oxide, because aluminum is highly combustible: • Fe2O3 + 2Al → 2 Fe + Al2O3 + heat Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220. • Demonstration! – Thermite Reaction – The Aluminum reduces the oxide of another metal, most commonly iron oxide, because aluminum is highly combustible: • Fe2O3 + 2Al → 2 Fe + Al2O3 + heat • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O5v3XxFfUOw &feature=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • 1st Group Alkali Metals (Orange) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • 1st Group Alkali Metals (Orange) – One valence electron Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Key: Alkali Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224. • Alkali metals have one valence electron
  225. 225. • Alkali metals have one valence electron – Sodium
  226. 226. • Alkali metals have one valence electron • Halogens have seven valence electrons – Sodium
  227. 227. • Alkali metals have one valence electron • Halogens have seven valence electrons – Sodium - Chlorine
  228. 228. Sodium Chloride
  229. 229. Sodium Chloride Sodium has an electronegativity of 1.0 Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3.0
  230. 230. Sodium Chloride Sodium has an electronegativity of 1.0 Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3.0 3.0 –1.0 =
  231. 231. Sodium Chloride Sodium has an electronegativity of 1.0 Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3.0 3.0 –1.0 = 2 Electron diff.
  232. 232. Sodium Chloride Sodium has an electronegativity of 1.0 Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3.0 3.0 –1.0 = 2 Electron diff. Electronegativity Difference Type of Bond Formed 0.0 to 0.2 nonpolar covalent 0.3 to 1.4 polar covalent > 1.5 ionic
  233. 233. Sodium Chloride Sodium has an electronegativity of 1.0 Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3.0 3.0 –1.0 = 2 Electron diff. Electronegativity Difference Type of Bond Formed 0.0 to 0.2 nonpolar covalent 0.3 to 1.4 polar covalent > 1.5 ionic
  234. 234. Sodium Chloride Sodium has an electronegativity of 1.0 Chlorine has an electronegativity of 3.0 3.0 –1.0 = 2 Electron diff. Electronegativity Difference Type of Bond Formed 0.0 to 0.2 nonpolar covalent 0.3 to 1.4 polar covalent > 1.5 ionic Very Polar
  235. 235. • Video: Alkali Metals and water. – Apologies for the moderately inappropriate expression that is used. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m55kgyApYrY Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236. • Francium
  237. 237. • Francium
  238. 238. • Francium: Incredibly reactive in water.
  239. 239. • Francium: Incredibly reactive in water. Hardly any Francium occurs naturally in the earth's crust.
  240. 240. “I’m really far from the nucleus.
  241. 241. “I’m really far from the nucleus. It takes less energy to remove that outer electron from the atom.
  242. 242. “I’m really far from the nucleus. It takes less energy to remove that outer electron from the atom. This atom has a very low ionization energy.
  243. 243. “I’m really far from the nucleus. It takes less energy to remove that outer electron from the atom. This atom has a very low ionization energy. Also the lowest electronegativity of any element.
  244. 244. • The Alkaline Earth Elements are metallic elements found in the second period of the periodic table Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • The Alkaline Earth Elements are metallic elements found in the second period of the periodic table (Aqua). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • The Alkaline Earth Elements are metallic elements found in the second period of the periodic table (Aqua). – Two valence electrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • The Alkaline Earth Elements are metallic elements found in the second period of the periodic table (Aqua). – Two valence electrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. • The Alkaline Earth Elements are metallic elements found in the second period of the periodic table (Aqua). – Two valence electrons Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Key: Alkaline Earth Metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250. • What Alkaline Earth metal is this?
  251. 251. • Answer! Calcium Atomic # 20
  252. 252. • Flame test – Can be used to visually determine the identity of an unknown metal or metalloid ion based on the characteristic color. – The heat of the flame converts the metal ions into atoms which become excited and emit visible light. – The characteristic emission spectra can be used to differentiate between some elements. • Learn more at… • http://www.chem.purdue.edu/bcce/Scaling_a_flashy _demonstration.pdf
  253. 253. • Flame test – Can be used to visually determine the identity of an unknown metal or metalloid ion based on the characteristic color when burned. – The heat of the flame converts the metal ions into atoms which become excited and emit visible light. – The characteristic emission spectra can be used to differentiate between some elements. • Learn more at… • http://www.chem.purdue.edu/bcce/Scaling_a_flashy _demonstration.pdf
  254. 254. • Flame test – Can be used to visually determine the identity of an unknown metal or metalloid ion based on the characteristic color when burned. – The heat of the flame converts the metal ions into atoms which become excited and emit visible light. – The characteristic emission spectra can be used to differentiate between some elements. • Learn more at… • http://www.chem.purdue.edu/bcce/Scaling_a_flashy _demonstration.pdf
  255. 255. • Flame test – Can be used to visually determine the identity of an unknown metal or metalloid ion based on the characteristic color when burned. – The heat of the flame converts the metal ions into atoms which become excited and emit visible light. – The characteristic emission spectra can be used to differentiate between some elements.
  256. 256. • Video Link Flame Test – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jJvS4uc4TbU
  257. 257. • How it works again. – When the atoms of a gas or vapor are excited (Heat), their electrons are able to move from their ground state to higher energy levels.
  258. 258. • How it works again. – When the atoms of a gas or vapor are excited (Heat), their electrons are able to move from their ground state to higher energy levels. – As go back to their ground state, they emit photons of very specific energy.
  259. 259. • How it works again. – When the atoms of a gas or vapor are excited (Heat), their electrons are able to move from their ground state to higher energy levels. – As go back to their ground state, they emit photons of very specific energy. • This energy corresponds to particular wavelengths of light.
  260. 260. • How it works again. – When the atoms of a gas or vapor are excited (Heat), their electrons are able to move from their ground state to higher energy levels. – As go back to their ground state, they emit photons of very specific energy. • This energy corresponds to particular wavelengths of light.
  261. 261. • How it works again. – When the atoms of a gas or vapor are excited (Heat), their electrons are able to move from their ground state to higher energy levels. – As go back to their ground state, they emit photons of very specific energy. • This energy corresponds to particular wavelengths of light. Learn more / conduct demonstration at… http://www.creative-chemistry.org.uk/activities/flametests.htm http://www.chem.purdue.edu/bcce/Scaling_a_flashy_demonstration.pdf
  262. 262.  Metalloids / Semi metals: Properties of metals and non-metals - - - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263.  Semi-conductors Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264. • What is this?
  265. 265. • Answer: Peanut Brittle – What’s the point here?
  266. 266. • Answer: Peanut Brittle – What’s the point here? – It’s brittle, and so are some of the metalloids.
  267. 267.  Brittle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268.  Brittle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269.  Brittle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270.  Can have luster. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  271. 271. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Key: Metalloids / Semimetals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272.  Non-Metals  Not metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. H He Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar K Ca Sc Ti Ga Ge As Se Br Kr Key: Non-metals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy H
  274. 274.  Non-metals…  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275.  H and He are non-metals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276.  H and He are non-metals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember, Hydrogen is an oddball.
  277. 277.  They are poor conductors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278.  They are poor conductors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  279. 279.  They are poor conductors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  280. 280.  They are poor conductors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  281. 281.  They are poor conductors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  282. 282.  They are poor conductors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  283. 283.  They are brittle (break when hit). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  284. 284.  They are brittle (break when hit). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  285. 285.  They are brittle (break when hit). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  286. 286.  Dull in color. (No Luster) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  287. 287.  Dull in color. (No Luster) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288.  Dull in color. (No Luster) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289.  Poor conductors of heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  290. 290.  Poor conductors of heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291.  Poor conductors of heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292.  They may be transparent or translucent. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293.  They may be transparent or translucent. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294.  They exist as a… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  295. 295.  They exist as a… (s), Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Solid
  296. 296.  They exist as a… (s), (l), Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Solid Liquid
  297. 297.  They exist as a… (s), (l), (g). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Solid Liquid Gas
  298. 298.  They exist as a… (s), (l), (g). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Solid Liquid Gas S Sulfur
  299. 299.  They exist as a… (s), (l), (g). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Solid Liquid Gas S Sulfur Br Bromine
  300. 300.  They exist as a… (s), (l), (g). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Solid Liquid Gas S Sulfur Br Bromine Cl Chlorine
  301. 301. • Is this extremely dangerous to use in your home?
  302. 302. • Is this extremely dangerous to use in your home? • Answer: Not if used correctly
  303. 303. • Is this extremely dangerous to use in your home?
  304. 304. • Are these extremely dangerous to use in your home together? • Answer: Yes!
  305. 305. • NaOCl + 2NH3 --> 2NaONH3 + Cl2.
  306. 306. • NaOCl + 2NH3 --> 2NaONH3 + Cl2.
  307. 307.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  308. 308.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  309. 309.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff.
  311. 311.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20
  312. 312.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55
  313. 313.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55 2.55 – 2.20 =
  314. 314.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55 2.55 – 2.20 = .35
  315. 315.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55 2.55 – 2.20 = .35 Differences 1.7 or greater, the bond is usually ionic, Differences Less than 1.7, the bond is usually covalent, Unless the difference is less than 0.5 the bond has some degree of polarity Differences of less than 0.5 are considered to be nonpolar.
  316. 316.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55 2.55 – 2.20 = .35 Differences 1.7 or greater, the bond is usually ionic, Differences Less than 1.7, the bond is usually covalent, Unless the difference is less than 0.5 the bond has some degree of polarity Differences of less than 0.5 are considered to be nonpolar.
  317. 317.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55 2.55 – 2.20 = .35 Differences 1.7 or greater, the bond is usually ionic, Differences Less than 1.7, the bond is usually covalent, Unless the difference is less than 0.5 the bond has some degree of polarity Differences of less than 0.5 are considered to be nonpolar.
  318. 318.  Covalently bonded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy CH4 Methane Electron Negativity Diff. Hydrogen = 2.20 Carbon = 2.55 2.55 – 2.20 = .35 Differences 1.7 or greater, the bond is usually ionic, Differences Less than 1.7, the bond is usually covalent, Unless the difference is less than 0.5 the bond has some degree of polarity Differences of less than 0.5 are considered to be nonpolar.
  319. 319.  They have a low density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  320. 320.  They have a low density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  321. 321.  They have a low density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  322. 322.  They have a low density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  323. 323. • SPONCH elements are non-metals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  324. 324. • 25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life. – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  325. 325. • 25 of the 92 naturally occurring elements are essential for life. – SPONCH elements are the most biologically important. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. • Organic Chemistry: The chemistry of carbon compounds.
  327. 327. • Organic Chemistry: The chemistry of carbon compounds. – Carbon is the duct tape of life. It holds everything together.
  328. 328.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  329. 329.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  330. 330.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  331. 331.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  332. 332.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  333. 333.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  334. 334.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  335. 335.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  336. 336.  Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things.  S. Sulfur Trace  P. Phosphorus 1.0%  O. Oxygen 65.0%  N. Nitrogen 3.3%  C. Carbon 18.5%  H. Hydrogen 9.56%  Other (Trace) 3.0%  Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  337. 337. • Activity! Please complete an animal graph of the data. – Percentages shown after instructions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  338. 338. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  339. 339. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  340. 340. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  341. 341. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  342. 342. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  343. 343. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  344. 344. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  345. 345. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  346. 346. • Percentage of SPONCH elements in living things. • S. Sulfur Trace • P. Phosphorus 1.0% • O. Oxygen 65.0% • N. Nitrogen 3.3% • C. Carbon 18.5% • H. Hydrogen 9.56% • Other (Trace) 3.0% • Sulfur, Sodium, Magnesium, Copper, Zinc, Selenium, Molybdenum, Fluorine, Chlorine, Iodine, Manganese, Cobalt, Iron Lithium, Strontium, Aluminum, Silicon, Lead, Vanadium, Arsenic, Bromine Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  347. 347. • Activity! Malleable and Ductile vs. Brittle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  348. 348. • Activity! Malleable and Ductile vs. Brittle – Please draw picture of each object. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  349. 349. • Activity! Malleable and Ductile vs. Brittle – Please draw picture of each object. – Bend each one and label which was malleable and which was brittle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  350. 350. • Activity! Malleable and Ductile vs. Brittle – Please draw picture of each object. – Bend each one and label which was malleable and which was brittle. – Which one was a non-metal, Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  351. 351. • Answer! The wood was a non-metal because it…? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  352. 352. • Answer! The wood was a non-metal because it…? • - Isn’t malleable or ductile • - Doesn’t have luster / shine • - Doesn’t conduct heat or electricity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  353. 353. • The paperclip is a metal because it… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  354. 354. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  355. 355. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  356. 356. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  357. 357. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  358. 358. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  359. 359. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  360. 360. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  361. 361. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  362. 362. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  363. 363. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  364. 364. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  365. 365. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  366. 366. • The paperclip is a metal because it… – Is ductile and malleable, has luster, conducts heat, electricity, and has a high density, solid, and reactive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  367. 367. • Activity! Passing around the elements. – Wear goggles and gloves to be safe. – We will rotate the bags with the elements every minute. • (Do not remove from bag) – Feel free to hold bag to guess at density • (High, medium, low) – Record the name, and what family the element belongs to and then describe some of its physical properties. – Electrical conductivity will be collected at the end. – Word Bank: (high luster / dull) (Malleable / Brittle) (High density, Medium, Low density) (Conducts electricity / Does not conduct) (Solid / Gas) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  368. 368. • Activity! Passing around the elements. – Wear goggles and gloves to be safe. – We will rotate the bags with the elements every minute. The names of the element will be on the bag. • (Do not remove from bag) – Feel free to hold bag to guess at density • (High, medium, low) – Record the name, and what family the element belongs to and then describe some of its physical properties. – Electrical conductivity will be gathered at the end. – Word Bank: (high luster / dull) (Malleable / Brittle) (High density, Medium, Low density) (Conducts electricity / Does not conduct) (Solid / Liquid / Gas) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  369. 369. Copper: Conducts electricity, malleable, ductile, moderate luster, high density, solid Carbon (Charcoal), Doesn’t conduct electricity, low density, brittle, no luster, solid Sulfur: Doesn’t conduct electricity, low density, brittle, no luster, solid Silicon: High luster, medium density, brittle, solid. Aluminum: High luster, malleable, medium density, solid. Nickel: High luster, malleable, high density, solid. Lead: Some luster, malleable, very high density, solid Oxygen: Gas Iodine: In bottle (liquid) Example…
  370. 370. Copper: Conducts electricity, malleable, ductile, moderate luster, high density, solid Carbon (Charcoal), Doesn’t conduct electricity, low density, brittle, no luster, solid Sulfur: Doesn’t conduct electricity, low density, brittle, no luster, solid Silicon: High luster, medium density, brittle, solid. Aluminum: High luster, malleable, medium density, solid. Nickel: High luster, malleable, high density, solid. Lead: Some luster, malleable, very high density, solid Oxygen: Gas Iodine: In bottle (liquid) Example…
  371. 371. • Activity! Passing around the elements. – Wear goggles and gloves to be safe. – We will rotate the bags with the elements every minute. The names of the element will be on the bag. • (Do not remove from bag) – Feel free to hold bag to guess at density • (High, medium, low) – Record the name, and what family the element belongs to and then describe some of its physical properties. – Electrical conductivity will be gathered at the end. – Word Bank: (high luster / dull) (Malleable / Brittle) (High density, Medium, Low density) (Conducts electricity / Does not conduct) (Solid / Liquid / Gas) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  372. 372. • Possible Elements – Copper: Conducts electricity, malleable, ductile, moderate luster, high density, solid – Carbon (Charcoal), Doesn’t conduct electricity, low density, brittle, no luster, solid – Sulfur: Doesn’t conduct electricity, low density, brittle, no luster, solid – Silicon: High luster, medium density, brittle, solid. – Aluminum: High luster, malleable, medium density, solid. – Nickel: High luster, malleable, high density, solid. – Lead: Some luster, malleable, very high density, solid – Oxygen: Gas – Iodine: In bottle (liquid) – Zinc: Luster, malleable, medium density – Magnesium: Luster, malleable, medium density Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  373. 373. • Activity! Elements and their density. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  374. 374. • Activity! Elements and their density. – Goggles and Gloves please. – Avoid breathing in any dust or particles. – Step 1 • Zero scale with graduated cylinder. • Fill small graduated cylinder with a metal 10 ml. Repeat process for each. • Metals are…Copper BB’s, Aluminum Foil, Lead / Steel Split Shot (Fishing). • Weigh graduated cylinder to determine weight of each. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  375. 375. • Activity! Elements and their density. • Fill graduated cylinder with water to the very top. • Gently pour in metal and collect the water displaced. • Add displaced water into another graduated cylinder and record in cm3 the volume of water. Repeat for each sample. • Find the density of each. • Density = Mass divided by volume. • Answer is in g/cm3 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  376. 376. • Activity! Metals and Non-metals / Semimetals Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  377. 377. • Lab Suggestion! Metals, Non-metals, and Metalloids. • http://www.nclark.net/MetalNonmetalLab.htm • http://mrbentleycod.tripod.com/sitebuildercon tent/sitebuilderfiles/student- metalnonmetalmetalloidlab.pdf
  378. 378. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid) – Which elements had properties of more than one group? – Predict the physical and chemical properties of Calcium, Cadmium, and Selenium.
  379. 379. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids.
  380. 380. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid)
  381. 381. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid) Non-Metal Metalloid Magnesium Sulfur Silicon Zinc Carbon Aluminum Copper
  382. 382. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid) Metal Non-Metal Metalloid Magnesium Sulfur Silicon Zinc Carbon Aluminum Copper
  383. 383. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid) Metal Non-Metal Metalloid Magnesium Sulfur Silicon Zinc Carbon Aluminum Copper
  384. 384. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid) Metal Non-Metal Metalloid Magnesium Sulfur Silicon Zinc Carbon Aluminum Copper
  385. 385. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put the elements that we investigated into the correct category. (Metal, Non-metal, Metalloid) Metal Non-Metal Metalloid Magnesium Sulfur Silicon Zinc Carbon Aluminum Copper
  386. 386. • Laboratory Investigation: Metals, Non- Metals, and Metalloids. – Without looking at a periodic table, put