Natural Selection, Evolution Lesson, Biology Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Change Topics Unit (Evolution and Natural Selection) unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3200+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 27 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 12 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus within the Change Topics Unit:
Concept "Everything is Changing", The Diversity of Life Photo Tour, Evolution History,Scopes Monkey Trials, Darwin, Evolution, Evidences of Evolution, Four Parts to Darwin's Theory, Natural Selection, The Mechanisms for Natural Selection, Divergent Evolution, Convergent Evolution, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Origins of Life (Other Theories), Origins of Life (Science Theory), Needs of Living Things, Origins of the Universe (Timeline), Miller-Urey Experiment, Amino Acids, How Water Aided in the Origin of Life, Human Evolution, Hominid Features, Evidences of Human Evolution, Hominid Skulls Ecological Succession, Primary Succession, Secondary Succession, Plant Succession, Animal Succession, Stages of Ecological Succession, Events that Restart Succession.
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

The Evolution and Natural / Change Topics Unit explores Evolution, Natural Selection, Characteristics of Life, Life Origins, Human Origins, Earth System History and Ecological Succession.

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Natural Selection, Evolution Lesson, Biology Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Which Finch is better adapted to crush large seeds that fall to the ground? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  6. 6. • Darwin observed the Galapagos finches while traveling on the H.M.S Beagle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  8. 8. • Darwin hypothesized that one finch landed on the Island. – This one finch over time and evolved into many different types of finches. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • Some finches have small beaks to eats small seeds, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. • Some finches have small beaks to eats small seeds, other finches have large beaks to crush hard large seeds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Some finches have small beaks to eats small seeds, other finches have large beaks to crush hard large seeds. Other beaks were designed to catch insects. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Which Finch is better adapted to crush large seeds that fall to the ground? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Which Finch is better adapted to crush large seeds that fall to the ground? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • They even evolved into a Vampire Finch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Many species were able to thrive if they made the journey to the Galapagos because once they arrived there were very few mammalian predators. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  23. 23. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  24. 24. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  25. 25. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  26. 26. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  27. 27. • Review Activity! The Hypotheticus Beast. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • The hypotheticus is a normal animal, it eats leaves and tubers (roots). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • The hypotheticus is a normal animal, it eats leaves and tubers (roots). A male hypotheticus meets a female. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • The hypotheticus is a normal animal, it eats leaves and tubers (roots). A male hypotheticus meets a female. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. • More babies are born than can possibly survive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • More babies are born than can possibly survive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. • Each Hypotheticus is slightly different than the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Each Hypotheticus is slightly different than the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. • Each Hypotheticus is slightly different than the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Each Hypotheticus is slightly different than the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Each Hypotheticus is slightly different than the other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Predators such the Fanged Tooth Scienceteachericus kept populations of the Hypotheticus in check. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Predators such the Fanged Tooth Scienceteachericus kept populations of the Hypotheticus in check. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • One of the offspring has more hair than most. The Hairy Hypotheticus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • One of the offspring has a slightly larger neck. The Long Necked Hypotheticus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • One of the offspring is a bit shorter and has longer claws. The Clawed Hypotheticus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Climate in Hypotheticus Land became drastically dry for the next several years. – Many of the shrubs are eaten or start to die. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. • Natural Resources are limited for the Normal Hypotheticus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • The normal Hypotheticus can’t reach the leaves, and there aren’t enough shrubs to survive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • The normal Hypotheticus can’t reach the leaves, and there aren’t enough shrubs to survive. – The Normal Hypotheticus has a difficult time surviving. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • The normal Hypotheticus can’t reach the leaves, and there aren’t enough shrubs to survive. – The Normal Hypotheticus has a difficult time surviving. – Tuber roots just below the surface are eaten quickly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Over thousands of years, the normal type Hypotheticus slowly have trouble surviving to reproduce. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • The Fanged Tooth Scienceteachericus has no problems killing these tired and weaker species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • The long necked Hypotheticus tend to survive more often because they can reach leaves on trees. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • With more Long Necked Hypotheticus surviving, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • With more Long Necked Hypotheticus surviving, Long Necked Hypotheticus tend to mate with Long Necked Hypotheticuses, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • With more Long Necked Hypotheticus surviving, Long Necked Hypotheticus tend to mate with Long Necked Hypotheticuses, over millions of years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • Overtime, nature favors the Long Necked Hypotheticus, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • Overtime, nature favors the Long Necked Hypotheticus, and gradually, those offspring with longer necks survive more often to reproduce and their offspring have long necks. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Overtime, nature favors the Long Necked Hypotheticus, and gradually, those offspring with longer necks survive more often to reproduce, and their offspring have long necks. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • Overtime, nature favors the Long Necked Hypotheticus, and gradually, those offspring with longer necks survive more often to reproduce, and their offspring have long necks. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • The clawed Hypotheticus can dig up tuber roots better than the other Hypotheticuses. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Nature favors Longer Clawed Hypotheticus, as they can reach the tubers, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Nature favors Longer Clawed Hypotheticus, as they can reach the tubers, slowly over thousands and thousands of generations, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Nature favors Longer Clawed Hypotheticus, as they can reach the tubers, slowly over thousands and thousands of generations, the Hypotheticus gets shorter, and gets larger claws for digging. – Those that are shorter with longer claws survive more to reproduce. – Their offspring are also shorter and clawed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Nature favors Longer Clawed Hypotheticus, as they can reach the tubers, slowly over thousands and thousands of generations, the Hypotheticus gets shorter, and gets larger claws for digging. – Those that are shorter with longer claws survive more to reproduce. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Nature favors Longer Clawed Hypotheticus, as they can reach the tubers, slowly over thousands and thousands of generations, the Hypotheticus gets shorter, and gets larger claws for digging. – Those that are shorter with longer claws survive more to reproduce. – Their offspring are also shorter and clawed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67. • Maybe it learns to dig and burrow in the earth to stay cool as the climate gets warmer. Maybe it loses its hair. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • Maybe it learns to dig and burrow in the earth to stay cool as the climate gets warmer. Maybe it loses its hair. – It is also advantageous to be smaller to burrow better. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • Over thousands of years, the clawed group of the Hypotheticus finds it difficult to mate with the Normal Hypotheticus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Over thousands of years, the clawed Hypotheticus finds it difficult to mate with the Normal Hypotheticus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • Eventually, the two won’t mate at all. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • Over hundreds of thousands to millions of years a new species has evolved. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • Over hundreds of thousands to millions of years a new species has evolved. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Over hundreds of thousands to millions of years a new species has evolved. – This is called adaptive radiation. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • In this environment, having more hair keeps you drier and warmer in a cold climate. – The Long Haired Hypotheticus has a slightly better chance of survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Populations of the Hairy Hypotheticus are stable in size except for some seasonal changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • The ones that have more hair survive more and thus reproduce more. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • The ones that have more hair survive more and thus reproduce more. – Because traits are passed down, more and more Hairy Hypotheticus result. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • The world is thrown into an ice age for 60,000 years,
  82. 82. • The world is thrown into an ice age for 60,000 years, only the most Hairy Hypotheticus survive.
  83. 83. • The world is thrown into an ice age for 60,000 years, only the most Hairy Hypotheticus survive.
  84. 84. • Now only really hairy hypotheticus have survived and they mate with other surviving hairy hypotheticus.
  85. 85. • Now only really hairy hypotheticus have survived and they mate with other surviving hairy hypotheticus.
  86. 86. • Over time, the hairy Hypotheticus is so different from the normal Hypotheticus that they can no longer mate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. • Over time, the hairy Hypotheticus is so different from the normal Hypotheticus that they can no longer mate. – A new species has evolved. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  89. 89. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  90. 90. • The Normal Hypotheticus went extinct, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • The Normal Hypotheticus went extinct, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • The Normal Hypotheticus went extinct, but its existence helped evolve several species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. Extinct
  101. 101. • Interestingly, based on both morphological and biochemical evidence, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. • Interestingly, based on both morphological and biochemical evidence, it is agreed that the manatees, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  103. 103. • Interestingly, based on both morphological and biochemical evidence, it is agreed that the manatees, dugongs, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  104. 104. • Interestingly, based on both morphological and biochemical evidence, it is agreed that the manatees, dugongs, and hyraxes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  105. 105. • Interestingly, based on both morphological and biochemical evidence, it is agreed that the manatees, dugongs, and hyraxes are the closest living relatives of today's elephants. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106. Extinct Moeritherium species – 50 million years ago.
  107. 107.  Variation + Many Offspring + Heredity = Natural Selection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108.  Variation + Many Offspring + Heredity = Natural Selection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109.  Variation + Many Offspring + Heredity = Natural Selection. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  111. 111. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  112. 112. • You can now complete this question.
  113. 113. • This video is what we are often taught when we are young. (Not correct) Lamarck – We will create a children’s story soon that explains the process according to Darwin. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmdWfPvyQ-A Shorter Version at.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdeosyDtYfg
  114. 114. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. – Be prepared for story time! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • Example story using a combination of paint images and PowerPoint drawing.
  116. 116. • Example story using a combination of paint images and PowerPoint drawing. • (Keep it simple for time sake) • Copy and paste saves time…
  117. 117. By Your Name
  118. 118. This is the story of Todd the Tortoise and how he got his shell.
  119. 119. One day Tom saw the love of his life Tina the Tortoise…
  120. 120. They went behind a rock and decided to start a family.
  121. 121. Tina laid many eggs. More were born than can possibly survive.
  122. 122. Natural resources are limited.
  123. 123. Sammy the Snake Enjoys eating tortoise eggs and baby tortoise.
  124. 124. • Only a few of the eggs survived to hatch into baby tortoise.
  125. 125. No two individuals were alike and baby Todd had this weird shell on his back.
  126. 126. No two individuals were alike and baby Todd had this weird shell on his back. “C’mon Todd, your so slow.”
  127. 127. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  128. 128. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  129. 129. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  130. 130. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  131. 131. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  132. 132. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  133. 133. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  134. 134. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  135. 135. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  136. 136. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  137. 137. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  138. 138. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  139. 139. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  140. 140. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  141. 141. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  142. 142. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  143. 143. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  144. 144. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  145. 145. • Predators such as Sammy the Snake kept populations of tortoise in check.
  146. 146. • One day Todd meet another female turtle that had a small shell thing on her back.
  147. 147. They went behind a rock and decided to start a family.
  148. 148. • Variation is inheritable and most of the offspring also had this shell.
  149. 149. • Todd Jr. bumped into Sammy the snake one day as an adult tortoise.
  150. 150. Todd’s hard shell made it very difficult for Sammy to eat him.
  151. 151. Shelled tortoise began surviving more often and were able to reproduce.
  152. 152. Overtime, more shelled tortoise survived because nature selected their shell for survival.
  153. 153. • Their offspring were also shelled. A new species was eventually born.
  154. 154. • Their offspring were also shelled. A new species was eventually born. “Who are you?”
  155. 155. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. – Be prepared for story time! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. – Be prepared for story time! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. – Be prepared for story time! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. – Be prepared for story time! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Activity! You need to create a story book about your own type of unique Hypotheticus. – Please include the mechanism for change (The parts of Natural Selection from the notes). – Create pictures, have fun with names. – Provide text above or below the pictures. – Your Hypotheticus should change into a new animal, or many animals over many thousands to millions of years. – Use technology if you want, or use paper, staples, and your creative abilities. – Be prepared for story time! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Video Link! How to draw / paint using PowerPoint. (Can you recreate as she does?) – Older version of PowerPoint. Video is a bit dry but works through the drawing process. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QS9_K7pTcgU
  162. 162. • These are the mechanisms that must be mentioned in your story. – Please record one on each slide now. You can arrange them into your story later.
  163. 163. • Hypotheticus Animal Peer Review Sheet
  164. 164. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  165. 165. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  166. 166. • You can now complete this question for homework.
  167. 167. • You can now complete this question for homework.
  168. 168.  Divergent evolution: When a group from a specific population develops into a new species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. • Examples of divergent evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • People are all of the same species, but we can see that people all over the world have minor differences from each other. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. Teacher can minimize out of slideshow and assist students in dragging the person to the correct star on next slide
  172. 172. • The Maasai in Kenya are tall and thin, adapted for maximum heat loss in the heat of East Africa. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • If you live in a cold environment, then you will usually have small ears to retain your heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and which in the cold climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Which fox lives in the warm climate, and which lives in the cold climate. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • The Inuit of the Arctic are short and squat, perfectly adapted for retaining heat in the cold winter. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Who is more adapted to live in a hot dry climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Who is more adapted to live in a hot dry climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy ―I’m sweating like a wild beast out here!‖
  188. 188. • Who is more adapted to live in a cold wet climate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189. ―Get me out of here!‖ ―I’m freezing!‖
  190. 190. • You can now complete this question.
  191. 191.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This Side: One part of the world
  193. 193.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This Side: One part of the world This Side: Another part of the world
  194. 194.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This Side: One part of the world This Side: Another part of the world Ex. S. America Ex. Asia and Australia
  195. 195.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  203. 203.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals.
  204. 204.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals.
  205. 205.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206.  Convergent Evolution: Similar evolved structures in unrelated animals. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  212. 212. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy What will this look like?
  213. 213. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • Convergent Evolution: Organisms evolve similar shapes or structures, in response to similar environmental conditions. – Despite the fact that their evolutionary ancestors are very different. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. • We see convergent evolution in Australia, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220. • We see convergent evolution in Australia, it separated from the rest very early, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • We see convergent evolution in Australia, it separated from the rest very early, and similar type of animals are found on each. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • You can now complete this question.
  223. 223. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  224. 224. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  225. 225. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature
  226. 226. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  227. 227. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  228. 228. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  229. 229. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  230. 230. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  231. 231. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  232. 232. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  233. 233. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  234. 234. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  235. 235. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  236. 236. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  237. 237. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  238. 238. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  239. 239. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  240. 240. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  241. 241. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  242. 242. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  243. 243. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed
  244. 244. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams
  245. 245. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control
  246. 246. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines
  247. 247. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene
  248. 248. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene Weapons, (tool use)
  249. 249. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene Weapons, (tool use) This is a picture of food aid being delivered to an area of the world that needs it very badly.
  250. 250. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene Weapons, (tool use) This is a picture of food aid being delivered to an area of the world that needs it very badly.
  251. 251. • This is a very important limiting factor in the human population.
  252. 252. • This is a very important limiting factor in the human population.
  253. 253. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  254. 254. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  255. 255. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  256. 256. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  257. 257. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  258. 258. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  259. 259. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  260. 260. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  261. 261. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life The key idea of r/K selection theory is that evolutionary pressures tend to drive animals in one of two directions — towards quickly reproducing animals who adopt as many niches as possible using simple strategies, and slowly reproducing animals who are strong competitors in crowded niches and invest lots of energy in their offspring.
  262. 262. • Activity! Bird Monsters.
  263. 263.  Please record the following  Beak types (utensils)  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264.  Spoon beak. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  265. 265.  Grabber Beak. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  266. 266.  Magnetic Beak. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  267. 267.  Tweezer Beak. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268.  Tweezer Beak. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269. • In the follow activity: You are required to eat seeds from a tray using different style beaks.
  270. 270. • In the follow activity: You are required to eat seeds from a tray using different style beaks. – As Darwin’s finches varied, the type of beak and food sources also vary.
  271. 271. • Rules – Nothing hits the floor (slipping hazard). – Obtain seeds casually (not a race) even though in nature it’s a struggle for survival. – No interference, although this does occur in nature a little bit. – Put seeds in cup (without use of hands) – Return neatly at end. – Keep voices down and stay focused on the task. – No complaining please if you get a stinky beak. • The environment / food source determines the usefulness of your beak. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Activity! Bird Eating Monsters. – Please sketch the following trays into your journal. – You will record your table rank (1-4) 1st is the winner, 4th is last in the circle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273. • Activity! Bird Eating Monsters. – Can you make a prediction as to which beak will be the best before the activity begins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  274. 274. • Bird Eating Monsters Procedure. A.) You are required to compete (being friendly) with other members of your table to eat the seeds in the tray. B.) Each group member only gets one type of beak for the whole class. You must use only your left hand, collect as many seeds as possible in the time given. A new tray will arrive at your table by rotating from group to group clockwise. C.) Put the seeds in your cup. D.) Estimate your count when down (Record your table rank on your pictures) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275. • Please answer the following in your journal? 1.) What type of beaks were suited for what type of seed? 2.) What beak was overall the best? Why? 3.) Was one of the beaks the worst? Which bird beak will most likely become extinct? 4.) What does this lab tell us about natural selection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276. • Please answer the following in your journal? 1.) What type of beaks were suited for what type of seed? 2.) What beak was overall the best? Why? 3.) Was one of the beaks the worst? Which bird beak will most likely become extinct? 4.) What does this lab tell us about natural selection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  278. 278. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  279. 279. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  280. 280. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  281. 281. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  282. 282. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  283. 283. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  284. 284. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  285. 285. • Please answer the following in your journal? 1.) What type of beaks were suited for what type of seed? 2.) What beak was overall the best? Why? 3.) Was one of the beaks the worst? Which bird beak will most likely become extinct? 4.) What does this lab tell us about natural selection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  286. 286. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  287. 287. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  288. 288. • Please answer the following in your journal? 1.) What type of beaks were suited for what type of seed? 2.) What beak was overall the best? Why? 3.) Was one of the beaks the worst? Which bird beak will most likely become extinct? 4.) What does this lab tell us about natural selection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  289. 289. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  290. 290. • Please answer the following in your journal? 1.) What type of beaks were suited for what type of seed? 2.) What beak was overall the best? Why? 3.) Was one of the beaks the worst? Which bird beak will most likely become extinct? 4.) What does this lab tell us about natural selection? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  291. 291. • Answer: – The environment decides which traits are favorable and unfavorable. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  292. 292. • Answer: – The environment decides which traits are favorable and unfavorable. – What’s favorable one year may not be favorable the next. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  293. 293. • Answer: – The environment decides which traits are favorable and unfavorable. – What’s favorable one year may not be favorable the next. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  294. 294. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  295. 295. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  296. 296. • Activity! Bird Structure Function and Survival by investigating beak type and foot type. – Each table group gets a token for each member, a white board, and dry erase marker + wipe. – Guess right and keep your token, guess wrong and lose it. Who will survive to the end? – Tokens = surprise at end. More tokens, more of the surprise. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  297. 297. • Activity! Bird Structure Function and Survival by investigating beak type and foot type. – Each table group gets a token for each member, a white board, and dry erase marker + wipe. – Guess right and keep your token, guess wrong and lose it. Who will survive to the end? – Tokens = surprise at end. More tokens, more of the surprise. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Good behavior = Bonus tokens to well behaved groups.
  298. 298. • Which bird will be best at surviving by breaking tough seeds? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  299. 299. • Which bird will be best at surviving by breaking tough seeds? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. • Which bird will be best at surviving by catching many small fish from the air? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  301. 301. • Which bird will be best at surviving by catching many small fish from the air? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. • Which bird will be best at surviving by tearing through flesh and killing small animals? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  303. 303. • Which bird will be best at surviving by tearing through flesh and killing small animals? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  304. 304. • Which bird will be best at surviving by tearing through flesh and killing small animals? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  305. 305. • Which bird will be best at surviving by swiveling its beak through the water to collect food? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  306. 306. • Which bird will be best at surviving by swiveling its beak through the water to collect food? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  307. 307. • Which bird will be best at surviving by breaking through plant matter to find insects? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  308. 308. • Which bird will be best at surviving by breaking through plant matter to find insects? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  309. 309. • Which bird can survive in a number of different habitats including coastal waters, agricultural land, and probing deep into insect burrows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310. • Which bird can survive in a number of different habitats including coastal waters, agricultural land, and probing deep into insect burrows. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  311. 311. • Which bird will be best at surviving by obtaining insects, seeds, and plants from the bottom of ponds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  312. 312. • Which bird will be best at surviving by obtaining insects, seeds, and plants from the bottom of ponds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  313. 313. • Which bird will be best at stabbing through the water to catch fish and other animals.
  314. 314. • Which bird will be best at stabbing through the water to catch fish and other animals.
  315. 315. • Which bird will be best at tearing through the body of small birds?
  316. 316. • Which bird will be best at tearing through the body of small birds?
  317. 317. • Which four birds will be best at eating small insects, seeds, and plant matter with a multi- functional beak? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  318. 318. • Which four birds will be best at eating small insects, seeds, and plant matter with a multi- functional beak? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  319. 319. • Which four birds will be best at eating small insects, seeds, and plant matter with a multi- functional beak? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  320. 320. • Which four birds will be best at eating small insects, seeds, and plant matter with a multi- functional beak? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  321. 321. • Which four birds will be best at eating small insects, seeds, and plant matter with a multi- functional beak? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  322. 322. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive in an aquatic environment? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  323. 323. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive in an aquatic environment? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  324. 324. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by walking through the mud? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  325. 325. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by walking through the mud? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by perching on branches? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  327. 327. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by perching on branches? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  328. 328. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by clinging to the side of trees? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  329. 329. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by clinging to the side of trees? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  330. 330. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by grasping and killing prey? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  331. 331. • Which foot type is best adapted to survive by grasping and killing prey? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  332. 332. • Which foot type is best adapted to hop around, cling, and eat French Fries? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  333. 333. • Which foot type is best adapted to hop around, cling, and eat French Fries? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  334. 334. • What animal has these feet?
  335. 335. • What animal has these feet?
  336. 336. • What animal has these feet?
  337. 337. • What animal has these feet?
  338. 338. • Remember, Birds came from dinosaurs
  339. 339. • Remember, Birds came from dinosaurs
  340. 340. This is grouse foot jewelry -Foot with lots of fine feathers to keep the bird warm on the snow.
  341. 341. The Jacana can walk on top of Lilly Pads because its toes are long.
  342. 342. The Jacana can walk on top of Lilly Pads because its toes are long.
  343. 343. • What type of birds are these?
  344. 344. • What type of birds are these? • Finches from the.. Galapagos Islands.
  345. 345. • What type of birds are these? • Finches from the.. Galapagos Islands.
  346. 346. • What type of birds are these? • Finches from the.. Galapagos Islands.
  347. 347. • Which letter is the male, and which is the female?
  348. 348. • Which letter is the male, and which is the female?
  349. 349. • Which letter is the male, and which is the female?
  350. 350. • Which letter is the male, and which is the female?
  351. 351. • Which letter is the male, and which is the female?
  352. 352. • Male birds are generally more flashy than females because they don’t usually sit upon the eggs / need the camouflage. – They try to impress the girls…
  353. 353. • Activity! Bird Structure Function. – Who still has their token left?
  354. 354. • Tropical birds show many variations in colors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  355. 355. ―Hey!‖ ―Stop looking at my butt.‖
  356. 356. • Video Link: Birds of Paradise. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L54bxmZ y_NE Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  357. 357. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  358. 358. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  359. 359.  Coevolution: The evolution of two or more species, each adapting to changes in the other.
  360. 360.  These ecological relationships include:
  361. 361.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host
  362. 362.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species
  363. 363.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species  Mutualistic species
  364. 364.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species  Mutualistic species
  365. 365.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species  Mutualistic species
  366. 366.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species  Mutualistic species
  367. 367.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species  Mutualistic species
  368. 368.  These ecological relationships include:  Predator/prey and parasite/host  Competitive species  Mutualistic species
  369. 369.  Mutualism: Both organisms benefit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  370. 370. • Types of mutualisms Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  371. 371. Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their fungus colonies.
  372. 372. Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their fungus colonies. -The ants then feed on the growing fungus.
  373. 373. Leaf cutter ants feed leaves to their fungus colonies. -The ants then feed on the growing fungus.
  374. 374. • There were all examples of trophic Mutualisms
  375. 375. • Trophic mutualism: Both species help feed each other. – -
  376. 376.  Trophic mutualism: Both species help feed each other.  Usually nutrient related.
  377. 377.  Cleaning symbiosis: One species gets food and shelter, the other has parasites removed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  378. 378. • Video Link! Bulldozer Shrimp and the Goby. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vR9X3gFT pL0&feature=related
  379. 379. • Video Link! Review of Symbiosis – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSmL2F1t81Q
  380. 380. • Question! Are these ants killing this caterpillar? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  381. 381. • Question! Are these ants killing this caterpillar? – Answer: No. they are eating some sugary secretions releases by the caterpillar. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  382. 382. • Video! Caterpillar and Ant defensive mutualism. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z3bWqlPLpMg
  383. 383.  Defensive mutualisms: One species protects the other and gets some benefits for its help. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  384. 384. • Never climb Acacia trees that have these galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and coming running out to attack. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  385. 385. • Never climb Acacia trees that have these galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and coming running out to attack. – They get drops of sugar from the leaves of the tree. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  386. 386. • Never climb Acacia trees that have these galls. Viscous ants feel the vibrations and coming running out to attack. – They get drops of sugar from the leaves of the tree. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  387. 387. • The Sea Anemome and the Clownfish are a mutualism.
  388. 388. • The Sea Anemome and the Clownfish are a mutualism. – The Anemome gets small scrapes from the clownfish, and the Clownfish gets protection.
  389. 389.  Dispersive mutualisms: One species receives food in exchange for moving the pollen or seeds of its partner. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  390. 390. • Pollination – Insects transfer pollen from one flower to the next, insects gets nectar.