Human Population Growth PowerPoint, Sustainability

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3,500+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 12 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 20 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus: Matter, Dark Matter, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro's Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal's Law, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb's Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday's Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics-Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R's, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy (The 11th Hour)

This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

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Human Population Growth PowerPoint, Sustainability

  1. 1. • Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more: Human Population http://www.prb.org/Educators/TeachersGuides /HumanPopulation/PopulationGrowth.aspx
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn. Please label. Ice Melting Water Boiling Vapor GasT E M P Heat Added 
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:
  6. 6.  Sustainability: Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7.  Sustainability: Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  Sustainability: Meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • How many kids do you want to have? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy This is the scariest graph you will ever see because it has a serious impact on your future.
  11. 11.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more: Human Population http://www.prb.org/Educators/TeachersGuides /HumanPopulation/PopulationGrowth.aspx
  30. 30.  Human Population Growth Over Time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more: Human Population http://www.prb.org/Educators/TeachersGuides /HumanPopulation/PopulationGrowth.aspx
  31. 31.  New Area of Focus: Human Population Growth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • Activity! Visiting the Human Population Clock. – http://math.berkeley.edu/~galen/popclk.html Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. This is called exponential growth. We can see the doubling occurring here
  34. 34. • Add a few of these into your graph, It’s a question of the assessment and important.
  35. 35. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Human hominids have been around for millions of years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Human hominids have been around for millions of years. Early Modern Humans for 100,000 years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Human hominids have been around for millions of years. Early Modern Humans for 100,000 years. Their total population never rose above ½ a billion. – What changed, let’s investigate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Human hominids have been around for millions of years. Early Modern Humans for 100,000 years. Their total population never rose above ½ a billion. – What changed, let’s investigate? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Human hominids Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Human hominids – Australopithecus (5-1 million years ago). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Human hominids – Australopithecus (5-1 million years ago). – Vegetarian resource extractors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Human hominids – Australopithecus (5-1 million years ago). – Vegetarian resource extractors. – Little impact on environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Homo habilis; 2 to 1 million years ago; first tool users (cultural adaptation)- Africa Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  45. 45. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • Homo erectus (1.5 million years ago to 200,000 years ago) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Homo erectus (1.5 million years ago to 200,000 years ago) – More complex tools & control of fire. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  48. 48. • Homo erectus (1.5 million years ago to 200,000 years ago) – More complex tools & control of fire. – Omnivorous resource extractors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Homo erectus (1.5 million years ago to 200,000 years ago) – More complex tools & control of fire. – Omnivorous resource extractors. – Increased capacity to affect environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Early Modern Humans / Cro Magnon Man (300,000 to 0 years ago) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Early Modern Humans / Cro Magnon Man (300,000 to 0 years ago) – Better resource extractors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Early Modern Humans / Cro Magnon Man (300,000 to 0 years ago) – Better resource extractors. – Expanded resource base. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • Early Modern Humans / Cro Magnon Man (300,000 to 0 years ago) – Better resource extractors. – Expanded resource base. – Expanded cultural capability. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Early Modern Humans / Cro Magnon Man (300,000 to 0 years ago) – Better resource extractors. – Expanded resource base. – Expanded cultural capability. – Expansion to all habitable regions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • Hunter / Gathers (Food Collectors) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • Hunter / Gathers (Food Collectors) – No direct / purposeful interference with resource supply. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Hunter / Gathers (Food Collectors) – No direct / purposeful interference with resource supply. – Emphasizes integration with environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • The Dorobo of Tanzania spend a few hours in the morning finding food and then socialize and relax for the rest of the day. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • I work 70+ hours a week. It is very stressful and I just want to see my kids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Both have their ups and downs. A happy medium between work and leisure may be the recipe… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Life expectancy of the modern world is higher. – Daily life of the Dorobo appears more relaxed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Ability to control environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Ability to control environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Ability to control environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Ability to control environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Yaaaaaaaaaah!” “Homo Sapiens Rock!”
  67. 67. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Ability to control environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • Homo Sapiens Sapiens • (100,000 to 0 years ago) – Culturally determined. – Ability to control environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69.  Anthropogenesis: Humans shaping their environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Prior to agriculture, hunters and gathers had to follow the animals. – To survive meant you had to move around.
  71. 71. • Food Foraging to Food Production (Agriculture) started 10,000 years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • Agricultural Revolution, It… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • Agricultural Revolution, It… – Allowed societies to grow food for surplus. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Agricultural Revolution, It… – Allowed societies to grow food for surplus. – Surplus allowed society to stay in one place. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • Agricultural Revolution, It… – Allowed societies to grow food for surplus. – Surplus allowed society to stay in one place. – Extra time to invent and improve practice. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • Domestication of animals vs. all of human history. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • Domestication of animals vs. all of human history. Human History Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Domestication of animals vs. all of human history. Domestication of animals Human History Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Milk, It does the body good… or does it? – No other mammal on the planet drinks milk past infancy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • Some people feel that humans haven’t coexisted long enough with animals to consume dairy. – Our bodies can’t break down dairy well. (lactose) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • Complex society (civilization); urbanism started 6,000 years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Activity -Folding paper and understanding exponential growth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • Activity -Folding paper and understanding exponential growth. – How many pages thick can you get your paper, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Activity -Folding paper and understanding exponential growth. – How many pages thick can you get your paper, – What happens every time the paper is folded. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • If we could fold the paper 42 times, it would equal the distance from the earth to the moon. (384,403 km from core)
  87. 87. • Video – Human Population Model 1 A.D. to 2030. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BbkQiQyaYc
  88. 88. • 1750 – Finding Borrowed Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. • 1750 – Finding Borrowed Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. • Fossil fuels are borrowed light: – They are the energy rich organic matter from millions of years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • Millions and millions of years ago, the sun fueled growth as it does today.
  92. 92. • Millions and millions of years ago, the sun fueled growth as it does today. – Plants and animals grew / built-up carbon compounds.
  93. 93. • Millions and millions of years ago, the sun fueled growth as it does today. – Plants and animals grew / built-up carbon compounds. – When they died, some of those carbon bonds stayed together.
  94. 94. • Millions and millions of years ago, the sun fueled growth as it does today. – Plants and animals grew / built-up carbon compounds. – When they died, some of those carbon bonds stayed together. (Those became our fossil fuels)
  95. 95. • Earth at Night 2009
  96. 96. • Earth at Night 1750
  97. 97. • The carrying capacity of the earth without fossil fuels is estimated to be about one billion people. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • The carrying capacity of the earth without fossil fuels is estimated to be about one billion people. Even less if our habits don’t change drastically. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • The carrying capacity of the earth without fossil fuels is estimated to be about one billion people. Even less if our habits don’t change drastically. Current world population is getting close to 7 billion. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • The carrying capacity of the earth without fossil fuels is estimated to be about one billion people. Even less if our habits don’t change drastically. Current world population is getting close to 7 billion. The fossil fuel supply will decline rapidly within 50 years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • The carrying capacity of the earth without fossil fuels is estimated to be about one billion people. Even less if our habits don’t change drastically. Current world population is getting close to 7 billion. The fossil fuel supply will decline rapidly within 50 years. • What will happen to the other 7 billion people? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. • Answer! Doom and Gloom.
  103. 103. • Answer! Doom and Gloom. You do the math. 6 billion – X = 1 billion.
  104. 104. • Answer! Doom and Gloom. You do the math. 6 billion – X = 1 billion. • X= Death by war and starvation.
  105. 105. • Answer! Doom and Gloom. You do the math. 6 billion – X = 1 billion. • X= Death by war and starvation.
  106. 106. • Answer! Doom and Gloom.
  107. 107. • Answer! Doom and Gloom. Unless…
  108. 108. • Answer! Doom and Gloom. Unless… • The bright side is coming…, but not yet.
  109. 109.  Carrying Capacity: The amount of food that an area of land will yield.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110.  Carrying Capacity: The amount of food that an area of land will yield.  Therefore, the number of people that an area of land will support. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111.  Carrying Capacity: The amount of food that an area of land will yield.  Therefore, the number of people that an area of land will support. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112.  Carrying Capacity: The amount of food that an area of land will yield.  Therefore, the number of people that an area of land will support. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114. • Humans are really good at increasing our carrying capacity.
  115. 115. • Humans are really good at increasing our carrying capacity.
  116. 116. • Humans are really good at increasing our carrying capacity.
  117. 117. • Humans are really good at increasing our carrying capacity.
  118. 118. • Video Link! World Food Crisis • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=- ihiicyWKm0
  119. 119. • Video Link! Food Production and Climate Change. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UW1Z_FIS 9zY&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=P LD038F5E6047D6AD8
  120. 120. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  121. 121. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  122. 122. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature
  123. 123. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  124. 124. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  125. 125. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  126. 126. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  127. 127. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  128. 128. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  129. 129. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  130. 130. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  131. 131. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  132. 132. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  133. 133. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  134. 134. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  135. 135. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  136. 136. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  137. 137. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  138. 138. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Which is density independent and which is density dependent?
  139. 139. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic)
  140. 140. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed
  141. 141. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams
  142. 142. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control
  143. 143. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines
  144. 144. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene
  145. 145. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene Weapons, (tool use)
  146. 146. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene Weapons, (tool use) This is a picture of food aid being delivered to an area of the world that needs it very badly.
  147. 147. • Limiting Factors: A factor that causes a population to decrease in size. – Sunlight – Water – Temperature – Disease – Parasites – Predators – Competition Density Dependent Factors (Other living things) Density Independent Factors (Non-living / Abiotic) Borrowed Dams Clothes Climate Control Vaccines Hygiene Weapons, (tool use) This is a picture of food aid being delivered to an area of the world that needs it very badly.
  148. 148. • This is a very important limiting factor in the human population.
  149. 149. • This is a very important limiting factor in the human population.
  150. 150. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  151. 151. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  152. 152. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  153. 153. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  154. 154. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  155. 155. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  156. 156. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  157. 157. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  158. 158. • Are we a R Species or a K Species? R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life The key idea of r/K selection theory is that evolutionary pressures tend to drive animals in one of two directions — towards quickly reproducing animals who adopt as many niches as possible using simple strategies, and slowly reproducing animals who are strong competitors in crowded niches and invest lots of energy in their offspring.
  159. 159. • So what’s the problem. R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  160. 160. • So what’s the problem. R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  161. 161. • So what’s the problem. R Species K Species Organism is very small size Large Organism Energy to make a new organism is low Energy to make a new organism is high Many babies made at once Low number of babies made at a time Early maturity Long time for maturity Short Life Long Life Each individual reproduces once and then dies Individuals can reproduce many times throughout life
  162. 162. • Video Link (Optional) Human Population Crashcourse. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8dkWQVFA oA&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNdTKZkV_GiIYXpV9w4W xbX
  163. 163. • Video Link (Optional) Population Ecology Crashcourse. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBOsqmBQBQ k&list=PL8dPuuaLjXtNdTKZkV_GiIYXpV9w4WxbX
  164. 164. • Conclusion Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165. • Conclusion – Carrying capacity was artificially increased by the introduction of agriculture beginning roughly 10,000 years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. • Conclusion – Carrying capacity was artificially increased by the introduction of agriculture beginning roughly 10,000 years ago. – Population increase was accelerated after 10,000 years ago, but not at modern levels. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • Conclusion – Carrying capacity was artificially increased by the introduction of agriculture beginning roughly 10,000 years ago. – Population increase was accelerated after 10,000 years ago, but not at modern levels. – Massively accelerated population growth is a modern phenomenon. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168. • Conclusion – Carrying capacity was artificially increased by the introduction of agriculture beginning roughly 10,000 years ago. – Population increase was accelerated after 10,000 years ago, but not at modern levels. – Massively accelerated population growth is a modern phenomenon. – Human population growth is not a biological imperative, but is culturally determined. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. • Malthus Approach to Biological Population and Carrying Capacity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • Malthus Approach to Biological Population and Carrying Capacity – A biological population (including humans) increases until carrying capacity is exceeded, resulting in starvation and death. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. • Malthus Approach to Biological Population and Carrying Capacity – A biological population (including humans) increases until carrying capacity is exceeded, resulting in starvation and death of millions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • Malthus Approach to Biological Population and Carrying Capacity – A biological population (including humans) increases until carrying capacity is exceeded, resulting in starvation and death of maybe billions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • Boserups Approach to Human Populations and Carrying Capacity: Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Boserups Approach to Human Populations and Carrying Capacity: – Human population will increase only if carrying capacity is increased; human population growth is culturally determined. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  175. 175. • Boserups Approach to Human Populations and Carrying Capacity: – Human population will increase only if carrying capacity is increased; human population growth is culturally determined. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176. • What do you think the future will be?
  177. 177. • What do you think the future will be?
  178. 178. • What do you think the future will be?
  179. 179. • What do you think the future will be?
  180. 180. • What do you think the future will be?
  181. 181. • What do you think the future will be?
  182. 182. • Human Footprint: A measure of human demand on the earth's ecosystems. . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Human Footprint: A measure of human demand on the earth's ecosystems. – How much land is needed to regenerate the resources needed for people each year? . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Human Footprint: A measure of human demand on the earth's ecosystems. – How much land is needed to regenerate the resources needed for people each year? – Where do we put the waste? . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185.  Megalopolis: A very large urban complex usually involving several major cities and towns. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Urban Sprawl: The uncontrolled or unplanned extension of urban areas into the countryside. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Chicago, Illinois.
  188. 188. Chicago grid system at night.
  189. 189. • Which will become the future?
  190. 190. • Which will become the future?
  191. 191. • Which will become the future?
  192. 192. “Your so negative, it isn’t like what your saying, we don’t have these problems.”
  193. 193. • Field Trip! Touring the east coast from Manchester NH to Washington DC. • http://www.google.com/earth/index.html • Record with a line IIII – Green Space not G.C. – Housing – Industry – Shopping / Parking – Landfill – Oil refinery – Golf Courses Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • Your Reaction’s – What did you think? – What did you see the most? – What did you see the least? – How does our town compare? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • No thought about sustainability here... Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:
  197. 197. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Areas of Focus within The Matter, Energy, and the Environment Unit. There is no such thing as a free lunch, Matter, Dark Matter, Elements and Compounds, States of Matter, Solids, Liquids, Gases, Plasma, Law Conservation of Matter, Physical Change, Chemical Change, Gas Laws, Charles Law, Avogadro’s Law, Ideal Gas Law, Pascal’s Law, Viscosity, Archimedes Principle, Buoyancy, Seven Forms of Energy, Nuclear Energy, Electromagnet Spectrum, Waves / Wavelengths, Light (Visible Light), Refraction, Diffraction, Lens, Convex / Concave, Radiation, Electricity, Lightning, Static Electricity, Magnetism, Coulomb’s Law, Conductors, Insulators, Semi-conductors, AC and DC current, Amps, Watts, Resistance, Magnetism, Faraday’s Law, Compass, Relativity, Einstein, and E=MC2, Energy, First Law of Thermodynamics, Second Law of Thermodynamics, Third Law of Thermodynamics, Industrial Processes, Environmental Studies, The 4 R’s, Sustainability, Human Population Growth, Carrying Capacity, Green Design, Renewable Forms of Energy.
  198. 198. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  199. 199. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  200. 200. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  201. 201. • http://sciencepowerpoint.comWebsite Link:

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