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Evidences of Evolution, Biology Lesson PowerPoint

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Change Topics Unit (Evolution and Natural Selection) unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3200+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 27 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 12 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation.
Areas of Focus within the Change Topics Unit:
Concept "Everything is Changing", The Diversity of Life Photo Tour, Evolution History,Scopes Monkey Trials, Darwin, Evolution, Evidences of Evolution, Four Parts to Darwin's Theory, Natural Selection, The Mechanisms for Natural Selection, Divergent Evolution, Convergent Evolution, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Origins of Life (Other Theories), Origins of Life (Science Theory), Needs of Living Things, Origins of the Universe (Timeline), Miller-Urey Experiment, Amino Acids, How Water Aided in the Origin of Life, Human Evolution, Hominid Features, Evidences of Human Evolution, Hominid Skulls Ecological Succession, Primary Succession, Secondary Succession, Plant Succession, Animal Succession, Stages of Ecological Succession, Events that Restart Succession.
This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information
If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

The Evolution and Natural / Change Topics Unit explores Evolution, Natural Selection, Characteristics of Life, Life Origins, Human Origins, Earth System History and Ecological Succession.

Evidences of Evolution, Biology Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. -Nice neat notes that are legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  4. 4. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  6. 6.  Evidence of Evolution  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7.  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8.  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • Principle of superposition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. • Principle of superposition. The rock layers on the bottom are older. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Principle of superposition. The rock layers on the bottom are older. More primitive creatures are seen in the older rock layers. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. • Picture of fossilized cyanobacteria. 3.5 billion years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. • Many fossils are primitive sea creatures of the Cambrian period. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • This is called a Gypsum Daisy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. • You then find your more complicated marine shelled fossils. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • Oldest fossilized brain: From a fish 300 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • Earliest fishes: Still millions and millions of years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. – Dating to millions / billions of years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. – Dating to millions / billions of years ago. – May be off by 30,000 years. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Carbon and Radioactive isotope dating is an extremely accurate method. – Dating to millions / billions of years ago. – May be off by 30,000 years. – But when your talking millions that is very close. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Early amphibians. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • Early Reptiles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • Early Birds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • Early mammals – Mesozoic, still the time of the dinosaurs. 85 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. • Earliest Primate fossil: 47 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • Hominid fossil – 3.2 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  28. 28. • I could have shown thousands of more slides of fossil evidence… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • I could have shown thousands of more slides of fossil evidence… – For time sake we must end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  30. 30. • I could have shown thousands of more slides of fossil evidence… – For time sake we must end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the fossil record and evolution at… http://www.agiweb.org/news/ evolution/examplesofevolution .html
  31. 31. • You can now complete this question.
  32. 32. • You can now complete this question.
  33. 33. • You can now complete this question.
  34. 34. • You can now complete this question.
  35. 35. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  36. 36. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  37. 37. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  38. 38. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  39. 39. • How many neck bones (vertebrae) does a giraffe and human have?
  40. 40.  Evidence of Evolution  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated.  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Next notes
  41. 41.  Chemical and anatomical similarities of related life forms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42.  Chemical and anatomical similarities of related life forms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43.  Chemical and anatomical similarities of related life forms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  44. 44. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  45. 45. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? – Each student must pick one, or teacher will assign. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. They all have… Some have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. They all have… Some have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Eyes, Nose, Ears, Mouth Warmbloodedness Heart, Lungs, Organs Eat Food, Move Tetrapods (four limbs) Walrus has lost limbs.
  48. 48. They all have… Some have… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Eyes, Nose, Ears, Mouth Warmbloodedness Heart, Lungs, Organs Eat Food, Move Tetrapods (four limbs) Walrus has lost limbs. Teeth, Fur, Hoofs, Smell Glands Eggs Live Birth
  49. 49. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • How are these life forms similar in their structure and composition? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Modern day animals share similar characteristics. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • Modern day animals share similar characteristics. – Here, the arm bones of the earliest amphibian are similar in modern species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • Modern day animals share similar characteristics. – Here, the arm bones of the earliest amphibian are similar in modern species. – Size and shape changes over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Which hand is a chimpanzee’s and which is a humans? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • Which of the following is a blastula (early embryo) of a sea urchin, starfish, frog, and human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  75. 75. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • Which of the embryos below is a human, chicken, fish, and cat? Human Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89. • Which are human, frog, and fish cells? – Cells are the building blocks of living things. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90. • The cells of a worm, or a jellyfish, or a grizzly bear are made of organelles that are similar in their composition and how they work. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (cells with a nucleus). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (cells with a nucleus). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • Cells are either prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (cells with a nucleus). – All cells are similar in their composition. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  96. 96. • Why would a modern whale have vestigial leg bones? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • Why would a modern whale have vestigial leg bones? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. Millions of Years Ago Present
  99. 99. Millions of Years Ago Present
  100. 100. Millions of Years Ago Present
  101. 101. Millions of Years Ago Present
  102. 102. Millions of Years Ago Present
  103. 103. Millions of Years Ago Present
  104. 104. Millions of Years Ago Present
  105. 105. Millions of Years Ago Present
  106. 106. Millions of Years Ago Present
  107. 107. • Answer: It use to be a species with legs before moving to the water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Video Link! (Optional) Hank explains vestigial structures. – Preview for language. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAfw3akpRe8 – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Picture of fossil and recreation of an early amphibian. – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Picture of fossil and recreation of an early amphibian. – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. • The Coelacanth.
  112. 112. • The Coelacanth. – Believed to have gone extinct with dinosaurs.
  113. 113. • The Coelacanth. – Believed to have gone extinct with dinosaurs. – Rediscovered (living) in 1938 off the coast of South Africa.
  114. 114. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals.
  115. 115. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  116. 116. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  117. 117. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  118. 118. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  119. 119. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  120. 120. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  121. 121. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  122. 122. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.
  123. 123. • The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud. “What we call arms were once legs.” “We are tetrapods.”
  124. 124. • One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up.
  125. 125. • One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up. – Being able to crawl from one pool to the next aided in survival.
  126. 126. • One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up. – Being able to crawl from one pool to the next aided in survival. – This ability was passed on from one generation to the next.
  127. 127. • Another theory
  128. 128. • Another theory – Lunged gulping fish could to avoid predation in the aquatic habitats by climbing into the shallows and then eventually the land. Learn more about lobe finned fish and tetrapod evolution at… http://dinosaurs.about.com/od/otherprehistoriclife/a/tetrapods.htm
  129. 129. • Evolution Available Sheet that follows slideshow for classwork.
  130. 130. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  131. 131. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  132. 132. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  133. 133. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  134. 134. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  135. 135. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  136. 136. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  137. 137. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  138. 138. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  139. 139. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  140. 140. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  141. 141. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  142. 142. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  143. 143. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  144. 144. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  145. 145. • Which picture below is a tetrapod?
  146. 146. • What type of snake is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • What type of snake is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. • This is not a snake, it’s a skink. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. • This is not a snake, it’s a skink. – An example of intermediate species between lizards and snakes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. • Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153. • Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • This is a human tailbone. This is an example of a vestigial structure. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • This is a human tailbone. This is an example of a vestigial structure. – Picture on right is human embryo. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Question to answer in your journal to optional video on next slide. – Describe 3 pieces of information about Tetrapod evolution. – Include visuals and evidence found and not found. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Video Link (Optional)! Tetrapod Evolution • Part I http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k- 5oQlnXSTM&feature=results_main&playnext=1&list=PL05E9C5F10C1EB2B4 • Part II http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3iFADplW6U&feature=related • Part III http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8HCTFe_XZFQ&feature=related • Part IV http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKRTrC1B1PI&feature=related • Part V http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khUw_OGRcBs&feature=related
  158. 158. • You can now complete these questions.
  159. 159.  Evidence of Evolution  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated.  - Chemical and Anatomical similarities  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Next notes
  160. 160.  The geographic distribution of related species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  162. 162. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  163. 163. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  164. 164. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin.
  165. 165. • Alfred Russel Wallace reasoned that the Indonesian archipelago can be divided into two distinct parts. – One in which animals are closely related to those of Australia. – And one in which the species are largely of Asian origin. Learn more about the Wallace Line at… http://www.radford.edu/~swoodwar/CLASSES/GEOG235/zoogeo g/walline.html
  166. 166. • These different salamander species are closely related and live within a close geographic border of one another. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • What is so unique about this salamander?
  168. 168. • What is so unique about this salamander?
  169. 169. • Many species have entered caves where they have changed form. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • Many species have entered caves where they have changed form. – If you live in complete darkness, than you don’t need eyes and rely on other senses such smell, and touch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. • This is a cave angel fish. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • This is a cave angel fish. – It has special hooks so that if can hold on to rocks in cave waterfalls. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  173. 173. • This is a cave angel fish. – It has special hooks so that if can hold on to rocks in cave waterfalls. – It also doesn’t have eyes and has lost the colored pigment in its skin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  174. 174. • Video! Cave Dwellers – Life evolving in one of the most difficult places on Earth. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ke1agwb00U – More: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbZ0T0TlwjE
  175. 175. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  176. 176. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • The change in species can occur through selective breeding by humans. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Does anyone know what this is? – Hint, It has to do with selective breeding. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • This is a device used to collect semen (sperm) from prize animals for selective breeding. – People pay big dollars for prize genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Selective Breeding: The intentional breeding of organisms with desirable traits in an attempt to produce offspring with similar desirable characteristics or with improved traits. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Corn 6,000 to 10,000 years ago looked much different than it does today. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Corn 6,000 to 10,000 years ago looked much different than it does today. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. • Corn 6,000 to 10,000 years ago looked much different than it does today. – By breeding the best corn species of a crop together over thousands of years, the edible part has become much larger. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189.  Evidence of Evolution  The fossil record of changes in plants and animals over millions of years.  From simple to more complicated.  - Chemical and Anatomical similarities  - The geographic distribution of species  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Next notes
  190. 190.  Genetics (DNA) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  193. 193. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  194. 194. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  195. 195. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  196. 196. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time
  197. 197. • Genetics (DNA) A more recent branch of science that shows how organisms have evolved and are related on a genetic level. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Remember: Evolution is the change in the gene pool over time , The gene pool is the set of all genes, or genetic information, in any population.
  198. 198.  Mutation: When a DNA gene is damaged or changed in such a way as to alter the genetic message carried by that gene. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Note: A mutation can be very harmful to an organism. In some cases however, it may help an individual survive / evolve over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • Note: A mutation can be very harmful to an organism. In some cases however, it may help an individual survive / evolve over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Note: A mutation can be very harmful to an organism. In some cases however, it may help an individual survive / evolve over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  202. 202. • Everyone trace your hand like so in your journal.
  203. 203. • Everyone trace your hand like so in your journal.
  204. 204. • Video Link! Five Fingers of Evolution – Describes genes / genetics a bit. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NdMnlt2k eE
  205. 205. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  206. 206. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  207. 207. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  208. 208. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  209. 209. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  210. 210. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  211. 211. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  212. 212. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  213. 213. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  214. 214. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  215. 215. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  216. 216. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  217. 217. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  218. 218. • Evolution is the change in the gene pool overtime. – Gene Pools can change when… – Populations can shrink • Diseases, extinctions, introduction of new better adapted species, predators. – Non-random mating • Organisms choose strongest mate, ones in similar boundaries, – Mutations in the genes • Genes can change. Some are good, some are bad. • The environment will decide. – Movement in and out of the population • Immigration, gene flow. – Natural selection • Adaptations to the environment that do well replace poor ones. Usually an advancement.
  219. 219. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  220. 220. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. – It shows how similar and how different species are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. – It shows how similar and how different species are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  223. 223. • Scientist look at the genes in a DNA molecule (It is in all of our cells). – DNA provides a unique marker. – It shows how similar and how different species are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  224. 224. • How does society use the information learned from studying DNA. – DNA is used to convict criminal in a court of law. – DNA is used to determine genetic diseases and disorders. – DNA is used to determine paternity – Whose the father or mother of a child? – DNA is also used as a tool to see how species are connected, and how they have changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  225. 225. • How does society use the information learned from studying DNA. – DNA is used to convict criminal in a court of law. – DNA is used to determine genetic diseases and disorders. – DNA is used to determine paternity – Whose the father or mother of a child? – DNA is also used as a tool to see how species are connected, and how they have changed. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  226. 226. • DNA provides insight into how similar and how different organisms are. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227. • DNA provides insight into how similar and how different organisms are. This allows taxonomist to classify organisms more accurately. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228. • DNA provides insight into how similar and how different organisms are. This allows taxonomist to classify organisms more accurately. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  230. 230. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  231. 231. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232. • Humans and Chimpanzee share 94% of the same genes. – We can get a blood transfusion from a chimp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233. • You can now complete this questions.
  234. 234. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  235. 235. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  237. 237. • Modern Importance of evolution. – Evolution is the change in species over long periods of time. – Today, the environment is changing at an alarming rate. – Can organisms evolve to this rapid environmental change? Is it occurring too fast? Will they change or will they be wiped out. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238. • Activity Reading! Charles Darwin – Found in activities folder. – Please read the difficult passage about Charles Darwin and record well written responses to the questions in your journal.
  239. 239. • Video Link! Darwin Biography – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOl0tHVV6Ck
  240. 240. • You can now complete page one of the bundled homework.
  241. 241.  The four parts to Darwin’s theories.  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242.  Organisms have changed over time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243. • Part I Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • Part I – Organisms have changed over time, and the ones living today are different from those that lived in the past. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • Part I – Organisms have changed over time, and the ones living today are different from those that lived in the past. – Furthermore, many organisms that once lived are now extinct. The world is not constant, but changing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • Part I – Organisms have changed over time, and the ones living today are different from those that lived in the past. – Furthermore, many organisms that once lived are now extinct. The world is not constant, but changing. The fossil record provides ample evidence for this view. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • Student speaker on the next slide. – Each line will be color coded and unfold one at a time. – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  250. 250. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  251. 251. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253. • All organisms are derived from common ancestors by a process of branching over time… – Populations split into different species, which are related because they are descended from a common ancestor. – Thus, if one goes far enough back in time, any pair of organisms has a common ancestor. – This explained the similarities of organisms that were classified together -- they were similar because of shared traits inherited from their common ancestor. – It also explained why similar species tended to occur in the same geographic region. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  254. 254.  Organisms share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  255. 255.  Organisms share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  256. 256.  Organisms share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  257. 257. What happened here?
  258. 258. That species went extinct
  259. 259. • Darwin’s Journal Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • This would be an incorrect according to evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. • This would be an incorrect according to evolution. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  262. 262. • Which picture below is the more accurate description of evolution? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  263. 263. • Answer! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  264. 264. • We make the assumption that there is just one tree of life, or just one genesis.
  265. 265. • We make the assumption that there is just one tree of life, or just one genesis. – Some scientists have theorized life may have begun more than once.
  266. 266. • We make the assumption that there is just one tree of life, or just one genesis. – Some scientists have theorized life may have begun more than once.
  267. 267. • Don’t look at humans as just coming from apes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  268. 268. • Don’t look at humans as just coming from apes. – We are one stem on a giant tree of primates that share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  269. 269. • Don’t look at humans as just coming from apes. – We are one stem on a giant tree of primates that share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  270. 270. • You can now complete these questions.
  271. 271. • Change is gradual and slow, taking place over a long time. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  272. 272. • Change is gradual and slow, taking place over a long time. – This was supported by the fossil record, and was consistent with the fact that no naturalist had observed the sudden appearance of a new species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  273. 273.  Change is a slow process over many generations.  Punctuated evolution shows us that change can during some periods speed up.  Large extinction events are common. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  274. 274.  Change is a slow process over many generations.  Punctuated evolution shows us that change can during some periods speed up.  Large extinction events are common. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  275. 275.  Change is a slow process over many generations.  Punctuated evolution shows us that change can during some periods speed up.  Large extinction events are common. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  276. 276. • Video - Evolution of Everything, 13.7 billion years ago to modern humans in 7 min. Enjoy! • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbJ_nIFmFsc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  277. 277. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  278. 278. Areas of Focus within the Change Topics Unit: Evolution History, Scopes Monkey Trials, Darwin, Evolution, Evidences of Evolution, Four Parts to Darwin’s Theory, Natural Selection, The Mechanisms for Natural Selection, Divergent Evolution, Convergent Evolution, Diversity of Life Photo Tour, rWhat does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Origins of Life (Other Theories), Origins of Life (Science Theory), Needs of Living Things, Origins of the Universe (Timeline), Miller-Urey Experiment, Amino Acids, How Water Aided in the Origin of Life, Human Evolution, Hominid Features, Evidences of Human Evolution, Hominid Skulls Ecological Succession, Primary Succession, Secondary Succession, Plant Succession, Animal Succession, Stages of Ecological Succession, Events that Restart Succession. Full unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html
  279. 279. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html
  280. 280. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  281. 281. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  282. 282. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Change Topics Unit (Evolution and Natural Selection) unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. This unit consists of a five part 3200+ slide PowerPoint roadmap, 27 page bundled homework package, modified homework, detailed answer keys, 12 pages of unit notes for students who may require assistance, follow along worksheets, and many review games. The homework and lesson notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow. The answer keys and unit notes are great for support professionals. The activities and discussion questions in the slideshow are meaningful. The PowerPoint includes built-in instructions, visuals, and review questions. Also included are critical class notes (color coded red), project ideas, video links, and review games. This unit also includes four PowerPoint review games (110+ slides each with Answers), 38+ video links, lab handouts, activity sheets, rubrics, materials list, templates, guides, and much more. Also included is a 190 slide first day of school PowerPoint presentation. Areas of Focus within the Change Topics Unit: Concept "Everything is Changing", The Diversity of Life Photo Tour, Evolution History,Scopes Monkey Trials, Darwin, Evolution, Evidences of Evolution, Four Parts to Darwin's Theory, Natural Selection, The Mechanisms for Natural Selection, Divergent Evolution, Convergent Evolution, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Origins of Life (Other Theories), Origins of Life (Science Theory), Needs of Living Things, Origins of the Universe (Timeline), Miller-Urey Experiment, Amino Acids, How Water Aided in the Origin of Life, Human Evolution, Hominid Features, Evidences of Human Evolution, Hominid Skulls Ecological Succession, Primary Succession, Secondary Succession, Plant Succession, Animal Succession, Stages of Ecological Succession, Events that Restart Succession. This unit aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards and with Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. See preview for more information If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com The Evolution and Natural / Change Topics Unit explores Evolution, Natural Selection, Characteristics of Life, Life Origins, Human Origins, Earth System History and Ecological Succession.

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