Ecology Abiotic Factors, Light, Animals and Plants Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint was one very small part of my Ecology Interactions Unit from the website http://sciencepowerpoint.com/index.html .This unit includes a 3 part 2000+ Slide PowerPoint loaded with activities, project ideas, critical class notes (red slides), review opportunities, challenge questions with answers, 3 PowerPoint review games (125 slides each) and much more. A bundled homework package and detailed unit notes chronologically follow the PowerPoint slideshow.
Areas of Focus within The Ecology Interactions Unit: Levels of Biological Organization (Ecology), Parts of the Biosphere, Habitat, Ecological Niche, Types of Competition, Competitive Exclusion Theory, Animal Interactions, Food Webs, Predator Prey Relationships, Camouflage, Population Sampling, Abundance, Relative Abundance, Diversity, Mimicry, Batesian Mimicry, Mullerian Mimicry, Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualism, Commensalism, Plant and Animal Interactions, Coevolution, Animal Strategies to Eat Plants, Plant Defense Mechanisms, Exotic Species, Impacts of Invasive Exotic Species. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thank you again and best wishes.

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Ecology Abiotic Factors, Light, Animals and Plants Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Light from the sun provides producers the energy to make sugar (photosynthesis). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  4. 4. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8. • Ecology: A study of the relationship between living things and the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  9. 9. • The Concepts in Ecology – Please pay attention to the next slide as you will need to learn and demonstrate an understanding of these big concepts. – Everything Is Changing. – There’s No Such Thing As A Free Lunch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  10. 10. • We can also associate the word balance to organisms trying maintain a homeostasis (balance) with their environment in order to survive. be the sun or artificial.
  11. 11. • We can also associate the word balance to organisms trying maintain a homeostasis (balance) with their environment in order to survive. be the sun or artificial.
  12. 12. • We can also associate the word balance to organisms trying maintain a homeostasis (balance) with their environment in order to survive.be the sun or artificial.
  13. 13. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold
  16. 16. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold
  17. 17. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected.
  18. 18. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected.
  19. 19. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world.
  20. 20. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world.
  21. 21. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive.
  22. 22. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive.
  23. 23. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem.
  24. 24. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  25. 25. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  26. 26. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  27. 27. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  28. 28. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  29. 29. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  30. 30. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  31. 31. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  32. 32. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  33. 33. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Organisms need energy to survive. Energy from the sun flows into and out systems. This energy drives our world and the organisms in it. Energy is lost “not destroyed” when it changes form. Flows Hot to Cold Ecological systems are organized within each other. The effects on one system will effect them all. All systems are interconnected. All organisms are in a constant state of change over time with the environment. Some organisms will change with another and will develop special interactions. Others with the nonliving world. Matter and energy cycle through the living and nonliving world. Organisms rely on this matter and energy cycling to survive. Animals are interconnected in a complex web of life. Changes on one part of the web have will effect other parts of the web and the stability of the entire ecosystem. Ecosystems have a way to balance changes so that up and down fluctuations are part of the natural balance of the whole.
  34. 34. Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit  Concept: Everything is connected to the non- living environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit  Concept: Everything is connected to the non- living environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Activity! (Optional) Making your bio-dome / Terrarium for periodic observations. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Activity! (Optional) Making your bio-dome / Terrarium for periodic observations. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Making your bio-dome / Terrarium – 1st Thin layer of pebbles. – 2nd Thin layer of sand on top of that. – 3rd Thin layer of soil (brown) – 4th Thicker layer of dark organic soil. – 5th Add small pieces of various moss – 6th Add a piece of lichen – 7th Add some small plants – 8th Add some small sticks with a mushroom on it. – 9th Add a few organisms • Just a few, no vertebrates allowed, do not over populate. • Don’t forget to lightly water it before closing the lid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Leave plenty of room for plants to grow! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Don’t over water your bio-dome! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Don’t over water your bio-dome! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Give your bio-dome plenty of light (energy source) and monitor the moisture content. – Light can be the sun or artificial.
  44. 44. • Give your bio-dome plenty of light (energy source) and monitor the moisture content. – Light can be the sun or artificial. Some information on making a terrarium… http://www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Terrarium
  45. 45.  Abiotic: All non-living chemical and physical factors in the environment. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46.  Biotic: Of, pertaining to, or produced by life or living organisms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. • Ecology Abiotic Factors Available Sheet.
  48. 48. • Ecology Abiotic Factors Available Sheet.
  49. 49. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Water Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  74. 74. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components
  75. 75. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Pressure Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Pressure Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Pressure pH Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Pressure pH Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82. • Activity! Place either a square or a circle below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic Air Water Light Soil Soil has some living components Gravity Pressure pH SPACE Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83. • You can now complete the first question on page 1 of your bundled homework.
  84. 84. • You can now complete the first question on page 1 of your bundled homework.
  85. 85. • What are some of the abiotic factors that affect living organisms? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86. • What are some of the abiotic factors that affect living organisms? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87.  The big 8 abiotic (non-living) factors that we will study include…  -  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88.  Moisture. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89.  Temperature. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90.  Wind. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  91. 91.  Light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  92. 92.  Soil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93.  Nutrients. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy S P O N C H
  96. 96.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur P O N C H
  97. 97.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus O N C H
  98. 98.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus Oxygen N C H
  99. 99.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus Oxygen Nitrogen C H
  100. 100.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus Oxygen Nitrogen Carbon H
  101. 101.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus Oxygen Nitrogen Carbon Hydrogen
  102. 102.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus Oxygen Nitrogen Carbon Hydrogen
  103. 103.  Cycles, SPONCH. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sulfur Phosphorus Oxygen Nitrogen Carbon Hydrogen
  104. 104. • SPONCH is also a delicious brand of cookie. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy S P O N C H
  105. 105. • Another abiotic factor is space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106. • Another abiotic factor is space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. • Another abiotic factor is space. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. • Other non-living factors, gravity, pH, substrate, oxygen levels, exposure, sound.
  109. 109. • Activity! If the class gets any of the next three question incorrect… – You will be forced to watch the most annoying video about biotic and abiotic factors ever created. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4u5Lo979Rkc
  110. 110. • Which of the abiotic factors discussed is missing from the list below? – A.) Light – B.) Temperature – C.) Moisture – D.) Wind – E.) Nutrients – F.) ________ – G.) Cycles / SPONCH
  111. 111. • Which of the abiotic factors discussed is missing from the list below? – A.) Light – B.) Temperature – C.) Moisture – D.) Wind – E.) Nutrients – F.) Soil – G.) Cycles / SPONCH
  112. 112. • Which of the abiotic factors discussed is missing from the list below? – A.) Light – B.) Temperature – C.) _________ – D.) Wind – E.) Nutrients – F.) Soil – G.) Cycles / SPONCH
  113. 113. • Which of the abiotic factors discussed is missing from the list below? – A.) Light – B.) Temperature – C.) Moisture – D.) Wind – E.) Nutrients – F.) Soil – G.) Cycles / SPONCH
  114. 114. • Which of the abiotic factors below effects an organism? – A.) Light – B.) Temperature – C.) Moisture – D.) Wind – E.) Nutrients – F.) Soil – G.) Cycles / SPONCH – H.) All of the above.
  115. 115. • Which of the abiotic factors below effects an organism? – A.) Light – B.) Temperature – C.) Moisture – D.) Wind – E.) Nutrients – F.) Soil – G.) Cycles / SPONCH – H.) All of the above.
  116. 116. • How did you do? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4u5Lo979Rkc
  117. 117.  All organisms have a range of tolerance for the abiotic factors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118.  All organisms have a range of tolerance for the abiotic factors. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • Do you have an ideal range for temperature? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • Which of the environments below is within your range of tolerance for heat, light, and temperature? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • Which of the environments below is within your range of tolerance for heat, light, and temperature? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • Answer! This environment is just right. You can survive in the other environments but it is more difficult. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance to brine shrimp for salt water? – Fill four clear containers ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill four clear containers ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. (10 oz) – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy No Salt 30 ml 60 ml 90 ml 120 ml
  127. 127. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy No Salt 30 ml 60 ml 90 ml 120 ml
  128. 128. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy No Salt 30 ml 60 ml 90 ml 120 ml
  129. 129. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix eggs. – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  130. 130. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is their range of tolerance. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132. • Activity Demonstration! Range of Tolerance. – What range of tolerance do brine shrimp have for salt water? – Fill five clear cups ¾ full with water. – Label cups No Salt, 30 milliliters, 60 milliliters, 90 milliliters, 120 milliliters. (1 tablespoon = 14.78 ml) – Add correct amount of salt to each container. – Use a popsicle stick or small spoon to add roughly the same amount of eggs to each container. Swirl water to mix – Cover each container with plastic wrap and secure with elastic band. – Place in undisturbed area for three days. – Observe each container to determine what salt level is within the optimal range of tolerance for brine shrimp. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. • Ecology Abiotic Factors Available Sheet.
  134. 134. • Video Link! (Optional) Biotic and Abiotic Components in an ecosystem. (10 min) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNfmew9C508
  135. 135.  Abiotic Factor: Light Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. • We will skip the physics associated with light and the electro-magnetic spectrum for a different unit of study. – We will focus on light and ecology. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  137. 137.  Organisms are affected by light…  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138.  Intensity: How bright it is (lumens). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139. HOW IS THIS BRIGHT COLOR ON YOUR EYES Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. HOW IS THIS BRIGHT COLOR ON YOUR EYES Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • Light can be a form of pollution.
  142. 142. “Please turn off the lights.” “I can’t take it anymore.”
  143. 143. • It is important to give your fish some time off. –Turn off the lights at night. Your fish will be happy in the morning. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy “Thank you!” “Now I can go to sleep.”
  146. 146. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150.  How long the light lasts.  Length of day, seasonal changes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151.  Quality / type of light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Activity! Let’s play with the lightning in this room. – Does switching the types of light effect your mood?
  153. 153. • Activity! Let’s play with the lightning in this room. – Does switching the types of light effect your mood?
  154. 154.  Light from the sun provides producers the energy to make sugar (photosynthesis). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155.  Light from the sun provides producers the energy to make sugar (photosynthesis). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156.  Light from the sun provides producers the energy to make sugar (photosynthesis). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. Photosynthesis: Is a process that converts carbon dioxide into organic compounds, especially sugars, using the energy from sunlight. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Sunlight Carbon Dioxide Water Oxygen Sugar
  158. 158.  Factors in the environment that affect the amount of light.  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159.  Aspect: Time of day, morning-noon-dusk. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160. • Crepuscular: When animals are active at dawn and at dusk. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161.  Cloud Cover. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162.  Seasons. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163.  Location. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. • Video! 24 hour time lapse from the arctic – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9t1KIWRP9ig
  165. 165. • Which letter generally gets the most amount of light throughout the year? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167. • Answer! Letter B because it is nearest to the equator. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168. • Answer! Letter B because it is nearest to the equator. It gets the most direct light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169. • Location can be large scale – Latitude on Earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170. • Location can be large scale – Latitude on Earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171. • It can also be local. – Limited light hits the floor in an established forest. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • A treefall gap is an opening in the forest canopy.
  173. 173. • A treefall gap is an opening in the forest canopy. – Gaps are formed after large trees die and fall which allows the regrowth trees and other plants as more light now hits the forest floor.
  174. 174. • A treefall gap is an opening in the forest canopy. – Gaps are formed after large trees die and fall which allows the regrowth trees and other plants as more light now hits the forest floor.
  175. 175. • A treefall gap is an opening in the forest canopy. – Gaps are formed after large trees die and fall which allows the regrowth trees and other plants as more light now hits the forest floor.
  176. 176. • A treefall gap is an opening in the forest canopy. – Gaps are formed after large trees die and fall which allows the regrowth trees and other plants as more light now hits the forest floor.
  177. 177. • A treefall gap is an opening in the forest canopy. – Gaps are formed after large trees die and fall which allows the regrowth trees and other plants as more light now hits the forest floor.
  178. 178.  Light can also affect an organisms movement.  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179.  Phototropism: The directional growth of plants in response to light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • Activity! Visit your bio-dome. – Please look for evidence of phototropism. – Which way is the light source? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • Activity! Visit your bio-dome. – Please look for evidence of phototropism. – Which way is the light source? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • Video Link! Plants searching for light. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9MV5 CgPgIQ
  183. 183.  Phototaxis: The movement of an organism either towards or away from a source of light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184.  Phototaxis: The movement of an organism either towards or away from a source of light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy also a waste of electricity
  185. 185.  Phototaxis: The movement of an organism either towards or away from a source of light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy also a waste of electricity
  186. 186.  Photokinesis – Movement based on the intensity of light.  Photo = Light  Kinesis = Movement Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187.  Photokinesis – Movement based on the intensity of light.  Photo = Light  Kinesis = Movement Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188.  Photokinesis – Movement based on the intensity of light.  Photo = Light  Kinesis = Movement Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189.  Bioluminescence: The production of light by a living creature. Can be used to attract and avoid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190.  Bioluminescence: The production of light by a living creature. Can be used to attract and avoid. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • Spray a cloud of light and disappear into the dark. – Organism use a bacteria mutualism. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. • Spray a cloud of light and disappear into the dark. – Organism use a bacteria mutualism. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • Spray a cloud of light and disappear into the dark. – Organism use a bacteria mutualism. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • Glow worms on the ceiling of a cave, they can attract insects. – What was name of the movement of organisms toward or away from light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. • Answer! What was name of the movement of organisms toward or away from light. – Phototaxis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  197. 197. • Video Link! Optional (Bioluminescence) • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXl8F- eIoiM Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  198. 198. • Video! Utilizing photokinesis with bioluminescence -The Glow Worm. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHM02ptBGB0 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  199. 199. • Cuttlefish (Really a Mollusk) – Has special cells called chromatophores that reflect light so it can change colors to match background. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  200. 200. • Videos! (Optional) Cuttlefish • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2x- 8v1mxpR0 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Video Link! Cuttlefish Again. • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqMNj Up6UeA
  202. 202. • You can now complete page 1 of your bundled homework package.
  203. 203. • Important note about the Electro-magnetic spectrum. – Some animals see different wavelengths of light. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  204. 204. • Question! Why are bees so efficient at finding nectar in flowers and pollinating flowers? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  205. 205. • They see the world in the Ultra-violet of UV spectrum. – Note the bulls eye below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • They see the world in the Ultra-violet of UV spectrum. – Note the bulls eye below. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Many insects, including bees see the world and flower in UV (ultra-violet). – Note the red bulls eye / target in UV. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Many insects, including bees see the world and flower in UV (ultra-violet). – Note the red bulls eye / target in UV. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Many insects, including bees see the world and flower in UV (ultra-violet). – Note the red bulls eye / target in UV. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Target makes it easier to see and then pollinate. Easy identification. (Fast Food)
  210. 210. • Other animals such as snakes see the world through the infrared spectrum. – We feel infrared as heat. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • Can you see the mouse below?
  212. 212. • Can you see the mouse below? – Too bad you can’t see using infrared?
  213. 213. • Can you see the mouse below? – Too bad you can’t see using infrared?
  214. 214. • Can you see the mouse below? – Too bad you can’t see using infrared? “I can see using Infrared” “This mouse didn’t stand a chance.”
  215. 215. • What would the advantage of seeing the world in infrared be for the snake? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Answer: The snake can see the heat of its prey. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  217. 217. • Answer: The snake can see the heat of its prey. – This is a helpful feature for hunting at night and the prey’s camouflage does not help. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2011 www.sciencepowerpoint.com LLC.
  219. 219. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j ournal=tst Please visit at least one of the “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet
  220. 220. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst
  221. 221. • This PowerPoint is one small part of my Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit. This unit includes… • A 4 Part 2,400+ Slide PowerPoint • 14 page bundled homework packaged that chronologically follows PowerPoint, + modified version • 16 pages of unit notes with visuals • 2 PowerPoint review games • Rubrics, Answer Keys, games, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_F actors_Unit.html
  222. 222. Areas of Focus within The Ecology: Abiotic Factors Unit Abiotic Factors, Biotic Factors, The Big 7 Abiotic Factors, Organisms Range of Tolerance, Light, How light affects Organisms, Photosynthesis, Factors in the Environment that Affect the Amount of Light, How Organisms Movements are affected by light, Bioluminescence, How temperature affects organisms, Thermoregulation, Physiological Regulation, Behavioral Regulation, Adaptation, Hypothermia, Hyperthermia, Warm-Bloodedness (endothermy), Cold-Bloodedness, Hibernation / Torpor, Advantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Warm-Bloodedness, Advantages of Cold-Bloodedness, Disadvantages of Cold- Bloodedness, Water, Water Requirements and Plants, Adaptations of Plants and Water, Adaptations of Animals and Water, Wind, Positives and Negatives of Wind to Organisms, How animals use Wind, How Plants use Wind, Wind Dispersal, Water Dispersal, McArthur- Wilson Island Biogeography Theory, Animal Seed Dispersal, Fire Ecology, Fire Dependence, Biogeochemical Cycles, Water Cycle, Carbon Cycle, Photosynthesis, Cellular Respiration, Oxygen-Carbon Dioxide Balance, Nitrogen Cycle, Phosphorus Cycle, Importance of Phosphorus, Nutrients, Nutrient Pollution and Aquatic Systems, Eutrophification. Full Unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  223. 223. • More Units Available at… Earth Science: The Soil Science and Glaciers Unit, The Geology Topics Unit, The Astronomy Topics Unit, The Weather and Climate Unit, and The River Unit, The Water Molecule Unit. Physical Science: The Laws of Motion and Machines Unit, The Atoms and Periodic Table Unit, The Energy and the Environment Unit, and The Introduction to Science / Metric Unit. Life Science: The Diseases and Cells Unit, The DNA and Genetics Unit, The Life Topics Unit, The Plant Unit, The Taxonomy and Classification Unit, Ecology: Feeding Levels Unit, Ecology: Interactions Unit, Ecology: Abiotic Factors, The Evolution and Natural Selection Unit and The Human Body Systems and Health Topics Unit. Copyright © 2011 www.sciencepowerpoint.com LLC.
  224. 224. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  225. 225. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  226. 226. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
  227. 227. • Thank you for your time and interest in this curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on how a unit works and link to the many unit previews to see the PowerPoint slideshows, bundled homework, review games, unit notes, and much more. Thank you for your interest and please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Best wishes. • Sincerely, • Ryan Murphy M.Ed • ryemurf@gmail.com

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