Discovery of Cells, Cell History, Biology Lesson PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint was one very small part of my Cellular Biology Unit from the website www.sciencepowerpoint.com . Teaching Duration = 4+ Weeks

This unit includes an interactive and engaging 3 part PowerPoint Presentation of 2,200+ slides with built-in class notes (Red Slides), lab activities with instructions and visuals, project ideas, discussion questions, assessments, challenge questions with answers, 3 review games (150 slides each), video and activity links, and much more
Text is provided in large print (32 font) and is placed at the top of each slide so it can read from all angles of a classroom. A shade technique and color coded text helps to increase student focus and allows teacher to control the pace of the lesson. Also included is a 11 page bundled homework package that chronologically follows the PowerPoint slideshow as well as a 8 page modified assessment. 16 pages of class notes (Word doc.) with images are also included for students who require assistance, as well as answer keys to both of the assessments for support professionals, teachers, and homeschool parents. 13 video shorts (.flv files) and several video and activity links are provided. A slide within the slideshow cues teacher / parent when the videos are most relevant to play. Video shorts usually range from 2-7 minutes and are included in organized folders. Three PowerPoint review games (125+ slides) is included. Answers to the PowerPoint review game is provided in PowerPoint form so students can self-assess. Lastly, several class games such as guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes, and the find the hidden owl somewhere within the slideshow are provided. Difficulty rating of 9 (Ten is most difficult).

Areas of Focus within The Cell Biology Unit.
Cellular Biology, History of Cellular Biology, Modern Cell Theory, Types of Cells, Prokaryotic Cells, Eukaryotic Cells, Cellular Organelles, Cell Wall, Plasma Membrane, Passive Transport, Diffusion, Osmosis, Active Transport, The Nucleus, Chromatin / Chromosomes, Nucleolus, Nuclear Membrane, Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum, Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum, Ribosomes, Protein Synthesis, Golgi Apparatus, Lysosomes, Cytoskeleton / Microtubules / Microfilaments, Centrioles, Plastid, Photosynthesis, Mitochondria, Cellular Respiration, Vacuoles, Organelles by real images.

This unit is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core Standards for ELA and Literacy for Science and Technical Subjects. Topics covered and standards addressed can be found at the end of this slideshow.


Thank you for your time and interest. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Best wishes.

Sincerely,
Ryan Murphy M.Ed
www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Discovery of Cells, Cell History, Biology Lesson PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Which two came up with the modern cell theory? Matthias Schleiden and Theodore Schwann Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  2. 2. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  3. 3. • Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.
  4. 4. • Robert Hooke and early microscopes. – First drawing of cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  5. 5. • Robert Hooke and early microscopes. – First drawing of cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  6. 6. • Why do you think Robert Hooke called them cells? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  7. 7. • Why do you think Robert Hooke called them cells? Named after monastery cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  8. 8. • Why do you think Robert Hooke called them cells? Named after monastery cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Robert Hooke at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/hooke.html
  9. 9. • 1600’s. – Anton van Leeuwenhoek first described living cells as seen through a simple microscope.
  10. 10. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) – His research, which was widely circulated, opened up an entire world of microscopic life to the awareness of scientists. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • Anton van Leeuwenhoek – Investigated… – Bacteria. – Protists. – Sperm Cells. – Blood Cells. – Nematodes (roundworms) – His research, which was widely circulated, opened up an entire world of microscopic life to the awareness of scientists. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Anton van Leeuwenhoek at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/history/leeuwenhoek.html
  18. 18. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  23. 23. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  24. 24. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  25. 25. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  26. 26. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  27. 27. • Francesco Redi – (1668) – People believed flies spontaneously came from meat. – Redi covered one flask, left one open to air. – Observed flies laying eggs on meat. – Flies come from flies. Life comes from life. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about experiment at… http://www.science20.com/science_20/francesco_redi_and_first_science_experiment-78827
  28. 28. • Life only comes from pre-existing life. Except of course for the first form of life. Science has disproven but also suggests abiogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  29. 29. • Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.
  30. 30. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  31. 31. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  32. 32. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  33. 33. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  34. 34. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  35. 35. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  36. 36. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  37. 37. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  38. 38. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  39. 39. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  40. 40. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  41. 41. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  42. 42. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  43. 43. • Pasteur' s experiments (1860' s) showed that micro-organisms are even carried in the air. • Both flasks boiled to sterilize Micro-organisms trapped in swan • Open to air (broth spoils). and broth does not spoil. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Video Link: (4:35) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63IoOLXmzKg
  44. 44. • As a result (Pasteur) – Sterilization of tools – Helped save millions.
  45. 45. • Activity! Putting an egg into vinegar to sit for 2 days. – We will observe the eggs later in the week. – Weigh the eggs before immersing them. “What are you doing with my eggs?” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  46. 46. • The Cell Theory • Translate the Latin “Omnis cellula e cellula” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  47. 47. Rudolf Virchow “All cells come from pre- existing cells.”
  48. 48. • Which is Robert Hooke (First Cells), Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  49. 49. • Which is Robert Hooke (First Cells), and which is Rudolf Virchow (Early cell theory)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  50. 50. • Which is Robert Hooke (First Cells), and which is Rudolf Virchow (Early cell theory)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  51. 51. • Which is Robert Hooke (First Cells), and which is Rudolf Virchow (Early cell theory)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  52. 52. • Which is Robert Hooke (First Cells), and which is Rudolf Virchow (Early cell theory)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  53. 53. Robert Hooke First Cells Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  54. 54. Robert Hooke First Cells Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  55. 55. Robert Hooke Robert Hooke First Cells First Cells Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  56. 56. “I just took that dumb wig off.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  57. 57. • Which is Robert Hooke (first cells), and which is Anton van Leeuwenhoek (first living cells)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  58. 58. • Which is Robert Hooke (first cells), and which is Anton van Leeuwenhoek (first living cells)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  59. 59. • Robert Hooke Anton van Leeuwenhoek – First Cells - First living cells Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  60. 60. • Robert Hooke Anton van Leeuwenhoek – First Cells - First living cells Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  61. 61. • Robert Hooke Anton van Leeuwenhoek – First Cells - First living cells Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  62. 62. • Which one is Anton van Leeuwenhoek (first living cells 1600’s), and which one is Rudolf Virchow 1900 (early cell theory)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  63. 63. • Which one is Anton van Leeuwenhoek (first living cells 1600’s), and which one is Rudolf Virchow 1900 (early cell theory)? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  64. 64. • Rudolf Virchow Anton van (photograph) Leeuwenhoek Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  65. 65. • Rudolf Virchow Anton van (photograph) Leeuwenhoek Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  66. 66. • Rudolf Virchow Anton van (photograph) Leeuwenhoek Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  67. 67. • Schleiden and Schwann used the work of Virchow and improved the cell theory. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  68. 68. • Schleiden and Schwann used the work of Virchow and improved the cell theory. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  69. 69. • Schleiden and Schwann used the work of Virchow and improved the cell theory. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  70. 70. • Schleiden and Schwann used the work of Virchow and improved the cell theory. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  71. 71. “Stop Schleiding with them Schwann!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  72. 72. “Stop Schwanning with them Shleiden?” “Stop Schleiding with them Schwann!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  73. 73. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which is Schleiden and Schwann?
  74. 74. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Which is Schleiden and Schwann?
  75. 75. I am Theodor Schwann Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  76. 76. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  77. 77. I am Matthias Schleiden Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  78. 78. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  79. 79. Together we are Schleiden and.. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  80. 80. Together we are Schleiden and… Schwann! Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  81. 81.  Modern Cell Theory  -  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  82. 82.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  83. 83.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  84. 84.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  85. 85.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  86. 86.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  87. 87.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  88. 88.  The cell is the basic unit of structure and function. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  89. 89.  Living things are made of cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  90. 90.  Living things are made of cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Not made of Cells
  91. 91.  All cells come from pre-existing cells.
  92. 92.  Cells contain genetic information. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  93. 93.  All cells are similar in composition Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  94. 94.  Energy flow of life occurs in cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  95. 95. • Homework question.
  96. 96. • Which is Schleiden and which is Schwann? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  97. 97. • Which is Schleiden and which is Schwann? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  98. 98. • Which is Schleiden and which is Schwann? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  99. 99. • Which is Schleiden and which is Schwann? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  100. 100. • Which is Schleiden and which is Schwann? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  101. 101. • Which one is the oldest? Name him and what did he find? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  102. 102. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  103. 103. • Letter C: Anton van Leeuwenhoek. – He looked at the first living cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  104. 104. • Which one came up with early cell theory. “All cells come from pre-existing cells” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  105. 105. • Which one came up with early cell theory. “All cells come from pre-existing cells” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  106. 106. • Rudolf Virchow • “Omnis cellula e cellula” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. • Which ones came up with modern cell theory? Name them? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. • Theodore Schwann Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. • Theodore Schwann Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. • Theodore Schwann and Matthias Schleiden Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. • Who is the new guy? What did he find? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  113. 113. • Who is the new guy? What did he find? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  114. 114. • Who is the new guy? What did he find? • Robert Hooke, Looked at first cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  115. 115. • Which one looked at living cells? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  116. 116. • Which one looked at living cells? • Anton van Leeuwenhoek. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  117. 117. • Which one came up with early cell theory? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  118. 118. • Which one came up with early cell theory? • Rudolf Virchow Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  119. 119. • Which two came up with the modern cell theory? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  120. 120. • Which two came up with the modern cell theory? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  121. 121. • Which two came up with the modern cell theory? Matthias Schleiden Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  122. 122. • Which two came up with the modern cell theory? Matthias Schleiden Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Which two came up with the modern cell theory? Matthias Schleiden and Theodore Schwann Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  124. 124. • Which is Schleiden and which is Schwann? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125. “This teacher needs to stop Schleidening with them!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126. “I agree with Schwann!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127. “I agree with Schwann!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy The Discovery of Cells and Development of Cell Theory. Learn more at… http://www.smithlifescience.com/celltheory.htm
  128. 128. • You can now complete this question.
  129. 129. • You can now complete this question.
  130. 130. • Humans are very similar to all other eukaryotic organisms as our cellular composition is closely related. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • Humans are very similar to all other eukaryotic organisms as our cellular composition is closely related. – We are made of the same cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132. • Humans are very similar to all other eukaryotic organisms as our cellular composition is closely related. – We are made of the same cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Eukaryotic Cells
  133. 133. • Humans are very similar to all other eukaryotic organisms as our cellular composition is closely related. – We are made of the same cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Eukaryotic Cells Prokaryotic Cells
  134. 134. • Human Cell
  135. 135. • Human Cell Frog Cell
  136. 136. • Human Cell Frog Cell Similar in composition.
  137. 137. • Human Cell
  138. 138. • Human Cell Bacteria Cell
  139. 139. • Human Cell Bacteria Cell Eukaryotic – Nucleus and membrane bound organelles.
  140. 140. • Human Cell Bacteria Cell Eukaryotic – Nucleus and membrane bound organelles. Prokaryotic Cell – Nucleoid, DNA free floats in cytoplasm,
  141. 141. • Visit iCell to the differences between Eukaryotic Cells and Prokaryotic Cells. – http://sciencenetlinks.com/tools/icell-app/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.
  143. 143.  There are two main groups of cells.  Prokaryotic  Eukaryotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144.  There are two main groups of cells.  Prokaryotic  Eukaryotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145.  There are two main groups of cells.  Prokaryotic  Eukaryotic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. • What are some of the similarities between Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • Answer: They both have all of these. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  148. 148. • Answer: They both have all of these. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  149. 149. • What are some of the differences between Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Cells? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  150. 150. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  151. 151. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  152. 152. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  153. 153. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Answer: Eukaryotic cells have a nucleus, and are much larger and have more organelles. (More complex) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157.  Prokaryotic cells  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158.  No nuclear membrane
  159. 159.  Genetic material is free in cytoplasm. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160.  No membrane-bound organelles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161.  Most primitive type of cell  appeared about 3.8 billion years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. • Eukaryotic Cells. We have eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163.  Eukaryotic Cells  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164.  Nuclear membrane surrounding genetic material Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  165. 165.  Nuclear membrane surrounding genetic material Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166.  Nuclear membrane surrounding genetic material Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167.  Nuclear membrane surrounding genetic material Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168.  Nuclear membrane surrounding genetic material Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169.  Numerous membrane-bound organelles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170.  Complex internal structure. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171.  Appeared approximately 2.2 billion years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • You can now complete this question.
  173. 173. Learn more about the differences at… http://www.diffen.com/difference/Eukaryotic_Cell_vs_Prokaryotic_Cell
  174. 174. • Cells Available Sheet for Classwork.
  175. 175. • Activity! Building the Cell. Owl
  176. 176. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  177. 177. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle – ● Shape (Structure Function ) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle – ● Shape (Structure Function ) – ● Function of the Organelle / Job Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle – ● Shape (Structure Function ) – ● Function of the Organelle / Job – ● How it performs this function Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle – ● Shape (Structure Function ) – ● Function of the Organelle / Job – ● How it performs this function – ● Anything related to SPONCH elements Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle – ● Shape (Structure Function ) – ● Function of the Organelle / Job – ● How it performs this function – ● Anything related to SPONCH elements – ● Where it is located in the cell? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Activity: Each student will pick a cellular organelle and create a poster in the shape of that organelle. (Requirement sheet) Requirements on Poster. – ● Name of the Organelle – ● Shape (Structure Function ) – ● Function of the Organelle / Job – ● How it performs this function – ● Anything related to SPONCH elements – ● Where it is located in the cell? – ● Other cool things not mentioned. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Example – Without text requirements. Lots of informative text about the mitochondria will go around the organelle. Lots of informative text about the mitochondria will go around the organelle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Put name on it.
  185. 185. Name Name
  186. 186. • Activity! Creating a Cell City. Worksheet Provided.
  187. 187. • Information can be gathered at…iCell – http://sciencenetlinks.com/tools/icell-app/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. • Activity! Cell City – Can use Google Sketch Up http://sketchup.google.com/ Lots of Info and the name of the organelles needs to be added to the sketch using the text feature. Arrows will also be used which is part of the text feature to label the parts of the city.
  189. 189. • Cell City Instructions Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • Cell City Instructions – Starts today, we build the city as we go through the cellular organelles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  191. 191. • Cell City Instructions – Starts today, we build the city as we go through the cellular organelles. – Must have all of the cellular organelles covered and how they relate to our world. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. • Cell City Instructions – Starts today, we build the city as we go through the cellular organelles. – Must have all of the cellular organelles covered and how they relate to our world. – Text that describes the job of each organelle. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  193. 193. • Cell City Instructions – Starts today, we build the city as we go through the cellular organelles. – Must have all of the cellular organelles covered and how they relate to our world. – Text that describes the job of each organelle. – Presentation at the end. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  194. 194. • Guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  195. 195. • Guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  196. 196. “Do you think they got us Schwann?“
  197. 197. “Do you think they got us Schwann?“ “I think they did Schleiden!”
  198. 198. “Schwann. ”Do you think they will remember us after this unit is over?”
  199. 199. “Schwann. ”Do you think they will remember us after this unit is over?” “Not a chance Schleiden.” “Not a chance…”
  200. 200. • The Wacky History of the Cell Theory – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OpBylwH9DU
  201. 201. • You should be close to this page on your unit assessment.
  202. 202. http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:
  203. 203. • This PowerPoint is one part of my Cellular Biology Unit. This unit includes… • A 3 Part 1,800 Slide PowerPoint slideshow • 11 page bundled homework package that chronologically follows the PowerPoint slideshow • 16 pages of unit notes with visuals for students who need assistance and support staff • Video and activity links, PowerPoint review game, answers keys, rubrics, and much more. • http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Uni t.html
  204. 204. Areas of Focus within the Cellular Biology Unit What is SPONCH?, Biologically Important Molecules, % of SPONCH in Living Things, What does it mean to be living?, Characteristics of Living Things, Needs of Living Things, Cellular Biology, History of Cellular Biology, Modern Cell Theory, Types of Cells, Prokaryotic Cells, Eukaryotic Cells, Cellular Organelles, Cell Wall, Plasma Membrane, Passive Transport, Diffusion, Osmosis, Active Transport, The Nucleus, DNA, Chromatin / Chromosomes, Nucleolus, Transcription, Translation Nuclear Membrane, Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum, Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum, Ribosomes, Protein Synthesis, Golgi Apparatus, Lysosomes, Cytoskeleton / Microtubules / Microfilaments, Centrioles, Plastid, Mitochondria, Vacuoles, Organelles by real images, and much more. Full unit can be found at… http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html
  205. 205. • Please visit the links below to learn more about each of the units in this curriculum – These units take me about four years to complete with my students in grades 5-10. Earth Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Geology Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Geology_Unit.html Astronomy Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Astronomy_Unit.html Weather and Climate Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Weather_Climate_Unit.html Soil Science, Weathering, More http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Soil_and_Glaciers_Unit.html Water Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Water_Molecule_Unit.html Rivers Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/River_and_Water_Quality_Unit.html = Easier = More Difficult = Most Difficult 5th – 7th grade 6th – 8th grade 8th – 10th grade
  206. 206. Physical Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Science Skills Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Science_Introduction_Lab_Safety_Metric_Methods. html Motion and Machines Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Newtons_Laws_Motion_Machines_Unit.html Matter, Energy, Envs. Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Energy_Topics_Unit.html Atoms and Periodic Table Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Atoms_Periodic_Table_of_Elements_Unit.html Life Science Units Extended Tour Link and Curriculum Guide Human Body / Health Topics http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Human_Body_Systems_and_Health_Topics_Unit.html DNA and Genetics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/DNA_Genetics_Unit.html Cell Biology Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Cellular_Biology_Unit.html Infectious Diseases Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Infectious_Diseases_Unit.html Taxonomy and Classification Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Taxonomy_Classification_Unit.html Evolution / Natural Selection Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Evolution_Natural_Selection_Unit.html Botany Topics Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Plant_Botany_Unit.html Ecology Feeding Levels Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Feeding_Levels_Unit.htm Ecology Interactions Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Interactions_Unit.html Ecology Abiotic Factors Unit http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Ecology_Abiotic_Factors_Unit.html
  207. 207. • Thank you for your time and interest in this curriculum tour. Please visit the welcome / guide on how a unit works and link to the many unit previews to see the PowerPoint slideshows, bundled homework, review games, unit notes, and much more. Thank you for your interest and please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Best wishes. • Sincerely, • Ryan Murphy M.Ed • ryemurf@gmail.com
  208. 208. • The entire four year curriculum can be found at... http://sciencepowerpoint.com/ Please feel free to contact me with any questions you may have. Thank you for your interest in this curriculum. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy M.Ed www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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