Domain Bacteria and Domain Archaea PowerPoint

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This PowerPoint is one small part of the Taxonomy and Classification unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. A 3800+ slide Five Part PowerPoint presentation becomes the roadmap for an amazing and interactive science experience full of built-in lab activities, built-in quizzes, video links, class notes(red slides),review games, projects, unit notes, answer keys, and much more. Also included is a student version of the unit that is much like the teachers but missing the answer keys, quizzes, PowerPoint review games, hidden box challenges, owl, and surprises meant for the classroom. This is a great resource to distribute to your students and support professionals. The Classification and Taxonomy Unit covers topics associated with Taxonomy and Classification. The unit examines all of the Kingdoms of Life in detail. Areas of Focus within The Taxonomy and Classification Unit: -Taxonomy, Classification, Need for Taxonomy vs. Common Names, What is a Species?, Dichotomous Keys, What does Classification Use?, The Domains of Life, Kingdoms of Life,The 8 Taxonomic Ranks, Humans Taxonomic Classification, Kingdom Monera, Prokaryotic Cells, Types of Eubacteria, Bacteria Classification, Gram Staining,Bacterial Food Borne Illnesses, Penicillin and Antiseptic, Oral Hygiene and Plaque, Bacterial Reproduction (Binary Fission), Asexual Reproduction, Positives and Negatives of Bacteria, Protista, Plant-like Protists, Animal-like Protists, Fungi-like Protists, Animalia, Characteristics of Animalia, Animal Symmetry, Phylums of Animalia (Extensive), Classes of Chordata, Mammals, Subclasses of Mammals, Characteristics of Mammals, Fungi, Positives and Negatives of Fungi, Divisions of Fungi (Extensive), Parts of a Mushroom, 3 Roles of Fungi, Fungi Reproduction, Mold Prevention, Plant Divisions, Kingdom Plantae. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com

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Domain Bacteria and Domain Archaea PowerPoint

  1. 1. • Journal Question? What is this? - Please draw it and then describe it
  2. 2. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  3. 3. Please use this red line
  4. 4. Please use this red line -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate.
  5. 5. Please use this red line -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate.
  6. 6. -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent.
  7. 7. -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics
  8. 8. -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages
  9. 9. -Please make notes legible and use indentations when appropriate. -Example of indent. -Skip a line between topics -Don’t skip pages -Make visuals clear and well drawn.
  10. 10. • RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very important and should be recorded in your science journal. • BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow directions, complete projects as described and answer required questions neatly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  11. 11. • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow “Hoot, Hoot” “Good Luck!” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  12. 12. • Keep an eye out for “The-Owl” and raise your hand as soon as you see him. – He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow “I’ll be about this big.” Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  13. 13. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  14. 14. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  15. 15. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  16. 16. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  17. 17. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  18. 18. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  19. 19. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  20. 20. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  21. 21. • Class Expectations – You can show respect by… • Listening when the teacher or others are talking. – One speaker at a time, please raise your hand. • Please no cross-room conversations during work time. – You can be responsible by… • Staying organized and avoiding distraction. • Staying focused on task completion. – You can make good choices by… • Attending class regularly • Doing your best and never giving up. – Be Safe! • First, last, and always. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  22. 22. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  23. 23. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  24. 24. • Journal Question? What is this? - Please draw it and then describe it
  25. 25. • If this is how many bacteria are on the head of a pin. Imagine how many are on your hand.
  26. 26. “Imagine how much bacteria exist in snot!”
  27. 27.  Archaea: Unicellular microorganisms that is genetically different from bacteria and eukaryotes.
  28. 28.  Archaea: Unicellular microorganisms that is genetically different from bacteria and eukaryotes.  Often inhabiting extreme environmental conditions.
  29. 29. Not Living
  30. 30. • Domains and Kingdoms Domain Bacteria Archaea Kingdom Bacteria Archaea Protista Plantae Fungi Animalia (No nucleus) Prokaryotic (No nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Single or MultiCellular Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Multicellular Multicellular Multicellular Gets Energy from.. Varies Varies Varies Sunlight Absorbs Consumes Food Cell Type Prokaryotic
  31. 31. • Domains and Kingdoms Domain Bacteria Archaea Kingdom Bacteria Archaea Protista Plantae Fungi Animalia (No nucleus) Prokaryotic (No nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Single or MultiCellular Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Multicellular Multicellular Multicellular Gets Energy from.. Varies Varies Varies Sunlight Absorbs Consumes Food Cell Type Prokaryotic
  32. 32. • Archaea:
  33. 33. • Archaea:
  34. 34. • Archaeans include inhabitants of some of the most extreme environments on the planet.
  35. 35. • Image of acid mine drain filled with Archaea.
  36. 36. • Archaea also thrive in mud and they are one reason it is usually smelly.
  37. 37. • Archaea also live in digestive tracts where they produce methane.
  38. 38. • Archaea also live in digestive tracts where they produce methane. (Gas)
  39. 39. • Archaea also live in digestive tracts where they produce methane. (Gas)
  40. 40. • Although Archaeans can live in extreme environments, they are found just about everywhere on planet earth.
  41. 41. • Although Archaeans can live in extreme environments, they are found just about everywhere on planet earth. – and maybe other places in the solar system and beyond.
  42. 42.  Archaea includes… - -
  43. 43.  Archaea includes…  Halophiles - - (salty)
  44. 44.  Archaea includes…  Halophiles (salty)  Methanogens -
  45. 45.  Archaea includes…  Halophiles (salty)  Methanogens (make methane gas) -
  46. 46.  Archaea includes…  Halophiles (salty)  Methanogens (make methane gas)  Thermophiles (Thrive in hot) -
  47. 47.  Archaea includes…  Halophiles (salty)  Methanogens (make methane gas)  Thermophiles (Thrive in hot)  Psychrophiles (cold)
  48. 48. • Types of Archaea
  49. 49. • Types of Archaea – Methanogens: Ones that produce methane gas as a waste product of their digestion.
  50. 50. • Types of Archaea – Methanogens: Ones that produce methane gas as a waste product of their digestion. – Halophiles: Ones that live in salty environments.
  51. 51. • Types of Archaea – Methanogens: Ones that produce methane gas as a waste product of their digestion. – Halophiles: Ones that live in salty environments. – Thermophiles: They live at extremely hot temperatures.
  52. 52. • Types of Archaea – Methanogens: Ones that produce methane gas as a waste product of their digestion. – Halophiles: Ones that live in salty environments. – Thermophiles: They live at extremely hot temperatures. – Psychrophiles: Those that live at unusually cold temperatures.
  53. 53. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  54. 54. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  55. 55. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  56. 56. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  57. 57. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  58. 58. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  59. 59. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  60. 60. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  61. 61. • Name the type of Archaea? Methanogen, Halophile, Thermophile, Psychrophile
  62. 62. • Archaea look a lot like bacteria. – Which is Bacteria and which is Archaea?
  63. 63. • Archaea look a lot like bacteria. – Which is Bacteria and which is Archaea?
  64. 64. • Archaea look a lot like bacteria. – Which is Bacteria and which is Archaea?
  65. 65. • Archaea look a lot like bacteria. – Which is Bacteria and which is Archaea?
  66. 66. • Archaea look a lot like bacteria. – Which is Bacteria and which is Archaea?
  67. 67. • Archaea look a lot like bacteria. – Which is Bacteria and which is Archaea? Genetically (1970) they were found to be different enough that a new Domain needed to be created.
  68. 68. • Archaeans are among the earliest forms of life that appeared on Earth.
  69. 69. • Archaeans are among the earliest forms of life that appeared on Earth. – 4 Billion years ago.
  70. 70. • Archaeans are among the earliest forms of life that appeared on Earth. – 4 Billion years ago. – It’s now generally believed that the archaea and bacteria developed separately.
  71. 71. • Archaeans are among the earliest forms of life that appeared on Earth. – 4 Billion years ago. – It’s now generally believed that the archaea and bacteria developed separately. – Eukaryotes are believed to have split off from the archaea.
  72. 72. • Archaeans are among the earliest forms of life that appeared on Earth. – 4 Billion years ago. – It’s now generally believed that the archaea and bacteria developed separately. – Eukaryotes are believed to have split off from the archaea.
  73. 73. • Archaeans are among the earliest forms of life that appeared on Earth. – 4 Billion years ago. – It’s now generally believed that the archaea and bacteria developed separately. – Eukaryotes are believed to have split off from the archaea.
  74. 74. Both Small, One Celled, No Nucleus, (Prokaryotic), Have Tough Cell Wall, Abundant on Earth
  75. 75. Cell Wall contains different Amino Acid and Sugars. Cell Membrane is also different. Thrives in extreme environments eating hydrogen gas, carbon dioxide and sulfur. Older Both Small, One Celled, No Nucleus, (Prokaryotic), Have Tough Cell Wall, Abundant on Earth
  76. 76. Cell Wall contains different Amino Acid and Sugars. Cell Membrane is also different. Thrives in extreme environments eating hydrogen gas, carbon dioxide and sulfur. Older Both Small, One Celled, No Nucleus, (Prokaryotic), Have Tough Cell Wall, Abundant on Earth All bacteria have peptidoglycans in the cell wall. Different in RNA polymerases and thus in their protein synthesis. Younger
  77. 77. • Last 10 slides of Archaea. (All Visual –Enjoy) – Note: Bacteria will also be in the mix.
  78. 78.  Domain Bacteria is composed of microorganisms that are much more common than Archaea and live almost anywhere.
  79. 79.  Domain Bacteria is composed of microorganisms that are much more common than Archaea and live almost anywhere.
  80. 80.  Domain Bacteria is composed of microorganisms that are much more common than Archaea and live almost anywhere.
  81. 81. Who was paying attention?
  82. 82.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  83. 83.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  84. 84.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  85. 85.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  86. 86.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  87. 87.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  88. 88.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  89. 89.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  90. 90.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  91. 91.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  92. 92.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  93. 93.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  94. 94.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  95. 95.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  96. 96.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  97. 97.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles.
  98. 98.  Prokaryotic (No nucleus) and no internal organelles. Learn more / flash tour of bacterial anatomy at… http://www.cellsalive.com/cells/bactcell.htm
  99. 99. • Human Cell
  100. 100. • Human Cell Frog Cell
  101. 101. • Human Cell Frog Cell Similar in composition.
  102. 102. • Human Cell
  103. 103. • Human Cell Bacteria Cell
  104. 104. • Human Cell Eukaryotic – Nucleus and membrane bound organelles. Bacteria Cell
  105. 105. • Human Cell Eukaryotic – Nucleus and membrane bound organelles. Bacteria Cell Prokaryotic Cell – Nucleoid, DNA free floats in cytoplasm,
  106. 106. Which cell has a nucleus (Eukaryotic), and which is a bacteria (Prokaryotic). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  107. 107. Which cell has a nucleus (Eukaryotic), and which is a bacteria (Prokaryotic). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  108. 108. Cell with nucleus Eukaryotic Cell without nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  109. 109. Cell with nucleus Eukaryotic Cell without nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  110. 110. Cell with nucleus Eukaryotic Cell without nucleus Prokaryotic (Bacteria) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  111. 111. Cell with nucleus Eukaryotic Cell without nucleus Prokaryotic (Bacteria) DNA is in a ring not a nucleus Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  112. 112. • Which is prokaryotic?
  113. 113. • Which is prokaryotic?
  114. 114. • Which is prokaryotic?
  115. 115. • Which is prokaryotic?
  116. 116. • Which is prokaryotic?
  117. 117. • Which is prokaryotic?
  118. 118. • Which is prokaryotic?
  119. 119. • Which is prokaryotic?
  120. 120. • Which is prokaryotic?
  121. 121. • Which is prokaryotic? Learn more about the differences between eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells at… http://www.diffen.com/difference/Eukaryotic_Cell_vs_Prokaryo tic_Cell
  122. 122. • Microscopic picture of bacteria hiding inside a human lung. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  123. 123. • Tissue eating bacteria
  124. 124.  Types of Bacteria Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  125. 125.  Types of Bacteria  Sphere (Round) Shaped: Cocci Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  126. 126.  Rod shaped: Bacilli Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  127. 127.  Spiral shaped: Spirilli Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  128. 128.  Vibrio: Comma Shaped
  129. 129. • Vibrio: Comma Shaped – A genus of Gram-negative bacteria possessing a curved rod shape.
  130. 130.  Mycoplasma bacteria: Smallest known life form (jagged and random). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  131. 131. • Mycoplasma bacteria does not have a cell wall. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  132. 132. • Mycoplasma bacteria does not have a cell wall. – Causes many diseases including pneumonia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  133. 133. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Cocci, Bacilli, Spirilla, Mycoplasma. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  134. 134. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Cocci, Bacilli, Spirilla, Mycoplasma. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  135. 135. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Cocci, Bacilli, Spirilla, Mycoplasma. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  136. 136. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Cocci, Bacilli, Spirilli, Mycoplasma. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  137. 137. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Cocci, Bacilli, Spirilli, Mycoplasma. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  138. 138. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Cocci, Bacilli, Spirilli, Mycoplasma. Learn more / review at… http://biology.clc.uc.edu/courses/bio106/bacteria.htm Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  139. 139. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilla, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  140. 140. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilla, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  141. 141. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilla, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  142. 142. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilla, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  143. 143. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilla, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  144. 144. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci,, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  145. 145. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilli, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  146. 146. • Quiz 1-10 – Stand and make the symbol. • Mycoplasma Bacilli, Cocci, Spirilla, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  147. 147. • Bonus: What bacteria is this?
  148. 148. • Bonus: What bacteria is this?
  149. 149. • Bonus: What is my full name?
  150. 150. • Bonus: Draco Malfoy – From the Harry Potter series.
  151. 151. • Bonus: Draco Lucius Malfoy – From the Harry Potter series.
  152. 152. • A good start, but how it is organized also tells about the bacteria.
  153. 153. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  154. 154. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  155. 155. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  156. 156. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  157. 157. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  158. 158. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  159. 159. • Naming bacteria basics. – Use their shape and how they organize themselves to help name them. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  160. 160.  Diplo = Pair Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  161. 161.  Tetrad = Groups of four. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  162. 162. • Tetrad: Bacteria that fail to separate after they divide, but instead remain in groups of four forming squares. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  163. 163.  Sarcinae = Groups of Eight. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  164. 164. • Sarcinae: Tetrad bacteria that fail to separate after they divide, but instead remain in groups of eight forming cubes.
  165. 165.  Staphylo = Cluster Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  166. 166.  Strepto = Chain Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  167. 167.  Cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  168. 168.  Cyanobacteria.  It’s photosynthetic (gets energy from sun). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  169. 169.  Cyanobacteria.  It’s photosynthetic (gets energy from sun). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  170. 170.  Cyanobacteria.  It’s photosynthetic (gets energy from sun). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  171. 171.  Cyanobacteria.  It’s photosynthetic (gets energy from sun). Cyanobacteria is the oldest known fossils, more than 3.5 billion years old. They are one of the largest and most important groups of bacteria on earth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  172. 172. • The oxygen atmosphere that we depend on was generated by numerous cyanobacteria during the Archaean and Proterozoic Eras.
  173. 173. • The oxygen atmosphere that we depend on was generated by numerous cyanobacteria during the Archaean and Proterozoic Eras. – Before that time, the atmosphere had a very different chemistry, unsuitable for life as we know it today.
  174. 174. • Cyanobacteria gave rise to the origin of plants.
  175. 175. • Cyanobacteria gave rise to the origin of plants. – The chloroplast that helps plants make food from the sun is a cyanobacterium living within the plant's cells.
  176. 176. Learn more about cyanobacteria at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/bacteria/cyanointro.html
  177. 177.  Gram staining: Technique used to identify bacteria. - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  178. 178.  Pink and Red: Gram Negative Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  179. 179. • A pink slip can often mean negative things. Pink = Gram negative. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  180. 180.  Gram Positive = Dark Purple Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  181. 181.  Gram Positive = Dark Purple Learn more about gram staining at… http://serc.carleton.edu/microbelife/research_methods/microscop y/gramstain.html Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  182. 182. • Purple start with a “P” and so does the word positive. Purple = Gram positive. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  183. 183. • Which picture is gram positive bacteria, and which is gram negative bacteria? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  184. 184. • Which picture is gram positive bacteria, and which is gram negative bacteria? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  185. 185. • Gram Positive+ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  186. 186. • Gram Positive+ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  187. 187. • Gram Positive+ Gram Negative Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  188. 188. • Gram Positive+ Gram Negative Gram Staining Lab found at… http://web.clark.edu/tkibota/240/Lab/LM6_GramSta in/GramStain.pdf and Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  189. 189. • Virtual Gram Staining Lesson. (15 minutes) – http://virtuallab.nmsu.edu/stain.php Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  190. 190. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  191. 191. • Quiz 1-10 Name the type of bacteria, – Be specific so include diplo, tetrad, sarcinae, stepto, staphylo, cyanobacteria, – and gram + or – if applicable. – As well as Cocci, Bacilli, and Spirilli. – Anything goes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  192. 192. Warm up round before quiz
  193. 193. • One more practice before Quiz Wiz. – Which bacteria is the arrow pointing to?
  194. 194. • Answer: Cocci
  195. 195. • Practice before Quiz Wiz. – Which bacteria is the arrow pointing to?
  196. 196. • Answer: Spirilli
  197. 197. • Practice before Quiz Wiz. – Which bacteria is the arrow pointing to?
  198. 198. • Answer: Bacilli
  199. 199. • Bonus – Who am I? “I pity the fool that doesn’t respect bacteria!”
  200. 200. • Answers to the Quiz 1-10. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  201. 201. • Bonus – Who am I? “I pity the fool that doesn’t respect bacteria!”
  202. 202. • Bonus – Mr. T “That’s right fool, and don’t forget it!”
  203. 203.  New Area of Focus: Bacteria and your health. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  204. 204. This portion of the unit will begin discussing the negatives of bacteria / food borne illness. It’s important to know that bacteria are critical to our survival and play many important roles in the ecosystem.
  205. 205. • Why should you care about learning about food borne illnesses? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  206. 206. • Answer! 76+ million Americans contract a food borne illness each year. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  207. 207. • Answer! 76+ million Americans contract a food borne illness each year. – Learning about them can help you when the picture below becomes your home for a few days. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  208. 208. • Answer! 76+ million Americans contract a food borne illness each year. – Learning about them can help you when the picture below becomes your home for a few days. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  209. 209. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  210. 210. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  211. 211. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  212. 212. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  213. 213. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  214. 214. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  215. 215. • Bacterial Food Poisoning – 81 million cases a year. – 20 of the many thousands of different bacteria actually are the culprits. – Symptoms, including diarrhea, fever, vomiting, abdominal cramps, and dehydration. – Salmonella, E.coli. Learn more about bacterial food poisoning at… http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/bacteria/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  216. 216. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  217. 217. • Activity! A trip to The BAZAAR Café. • Please record the following. • BAZAAR Café – 1.) – 2.) – 3.) – 4.) – 5.) – 6.) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  218. 218. • Activity! A trip to The BAZAAR Café. – Please select one item from each table and put a spoonful into your cup and then record that item on your list. – Put all six items in your cup (stomach). – Please use the spoon in each container only as not to cross contaminate the buffet. – Once everyone is seated we will test who has contracted a food borne illness by dipping a strip of Litmus paper into your cup. – Green = You contacted a food born illness. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  219. 219. Create a name / specific food item for each and put on the card. Three food items are contaminated with bacteria (baking soda) Most cups filled with just water, and three with water and baking soda
  220. 220. • Activity! A trip to The BAZAAR Café. – Teacher added Baking Soda in a few of the bowls of water. (Could use NaOH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  221. 221. • Activity! A trip to The BAZAAR Café. – Teacher added Baking Soda in a few of the bowls of water. (Could use NaOH) – Litmus Paper can then used to test which bowl had the Baking Soda / Food Borne Illness (Could us Phenolphthalein as indicator for the NaOH) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  222. 222. Activity Sheet! Found in Activities Folder
  223. 223. Item Initials of class X = Person got sick 0 = Not sick
  224. 224.  Bacterial food borne illness can be prevented by….     Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  225. 225.  Controlling the initial number of bacteria present. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  226. 226. • Washing food before preparation and serving. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  227. 227. • This lettuce looks healthy, why should I wash it? – It only grows in a field. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  228. 228. • What is one thing missing from this workplace? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  229. 229. • Answer – A restroom to dispose of waste and to wash hands. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  230. 230. • Answer – A restroom to dispose of waste and to wash hands. – Some places are responsible, follow code and provide facilities to workers. Some do not. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  231. 231. • Answer – A restroom to dispose of waste and to wash hands. – Some places are responsible, follow code and provide facilities to workers. Some do not. Bathroom Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  232. 232. • Where in a restaurant would you expect to find the most harmful bacteria? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  233. 233. • Where in a restaurant would you expect to find the most harmful bacteria? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  234. 234. • Where in a restaurant would you expect to find the most harmful bacteria? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  235. 235. • Answer! Studies have found the lemon / limes have more harmful bacteria on them than even the restrooms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  236. 236. • Answer! Studies have found the lemon / limes have more harmful bacteria on them than even the restrooms. – Very rarely are the lemons washed before they end up in your drink or on your food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  237. 237. • Learning proper hygiene and hand washing. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  238. 238. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  239. 239. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  240. 240. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  241. 241. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  242. 242. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  243. 243. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  244. 244. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  245. 245. • Proper hand washing techniques. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  246. 246. • Why do we turn off the faucet with the paper towel? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  247. 247. • Do you think that this bathroom door handle is germ free? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  248. 248. • Do you think that this bathroom door handle is germ free? -You’ve now washed your hands to just touch a handle that hundreds have touched. -Most haven’t washed their hands. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  249. 249. Fecal Matter
  250. 250. “I’m putting feces in my mouth but I don’t know it.”
  251. 251. • Activity – How well do you wash? – Squirt lotion on hand and rub it in until it’s gone. – Observe under Ultra-violet light. – Boys wash hands quickly (typical). – Girls follow guidelines from previous slide. – Follow up, compare the quick wash vs. long. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  252. 252.  Refrigeration: Prevents the small number of bacteria from growing rapidly. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  253. 253.  Destroying the bacteria by proper cooking.
  254. 254. • When the wait staff asks how you would like your meat cooked, say… • “I would like my meat well done!”
  255. 255. .
  256. 256. .
  257. 257.  Avoiding re-contamination.  Clean cutting board immediately after use. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  258. 258. • Don’t place raw produce on cutting board and then place something else that isn’t going to be cooked. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  259. 259. • Don’t place raw produce on cutting board and then place something else that isn’t going to be cooked. – Don’t prepare a salad on a board that has touched raw meat without cleaning. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  260. 260. • Don’t place raw produce on cutting board and then place something else that isn’t going to be cooked. – Don’t prepare a salad on a board that has touched raw meat without cleaning Lemon Slice? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  261. 261. Learn more about food borne illness prevention at… http://www.health.state.mn.us/foodsafety/basics.html
  262. 262. “Remember to properly cook your spaghetti and meatballs to avoid contamination.”
  263. 263. • Activity Reading with Questions. – Bacteria and your food.
  264. 264. • Preventing contamination is one of the best measures to fight bacteria.
  265. 265. • Preventing contamination is one of the best measures to fight bacteria. – But what happens when you contract a bacterial infection?
  266. 266. • Preventing contamination is one of the best measures to fight bacteria. – But what happens when you contract a bacterial infection?
  267. 267.  Penicillin: Antibiotic that destroys bacteria derived from penicillin mold (fungi).
  268. 268. • Penicillin won’t kill a virus, it only attacks bacteria.
  269. 269. • Penicillin won’t kill a virus, it only attacks bacteria. – Not completing prescription allows bacteria to become resistant.
  270. 270. • Penicillin won’t kill a virus, it only attacks bacteria. – Not completing prescription allows bacteria to become resistant. How do antibiotics work? Also how they can be harmful to your bodies natural bacteria at… http://kidshealth.org/parent/h1n1_center/h1n1_center_treatmen t/antibiotic_overuse.html or http://health.howstuffworks.com/medicine/medication/question8 8.htm
  271. 271. • Treat your wounds, they are an open door for bacteria.
  272. 272. • One type of infection is cellulitis (inflammation of the skin caused by bacteria) .
  273. 273. • Conjunctivitis: What type of bacteria is it?
  274. 274. • Conjunctivitis: What type of bacteria is it?
  275. 275. • Conjunctivitis: What type of bacteria is it?
  276. 276. • A pimple is made up of dead skin, oil, and lots of bacteria.
  277. 277. • A pimple is made up of dead skin, oil, and lots of bacteria.
  278. 278. • A pimple is made up of dead skin, oil, and lots of bacteria.
  279. 279. • Gangrene: A death of body tissue that usually occurs when there has been an interruption of blood supply, followed by bacterial invasion.
  280. 280. • Seek medical attention immediately. (Antibiotics)
  281. 281. • This is the treatment option when gangrene has spread.
  282. 282. • This is the treatment option when gangrene has spread.
  283. 283. • This is the treatment option when gangrene has spread.
  284. 284. • This is the treatment option when gangrene has spread.
  285. 285. • Don’t go swimming with an open cut or wound. – It is an entrance for bacteria into your body.
  286. 286. • What type of bacteria is this water bacteria called vibrio?
  287. 287. • Answer: Staphylobacillus (Coma shaped)
  288. 288.  Antiseptic: Agent that kills or inhibits the growth of micro-organisms on the external surfaces of the body.
  289. 289. • Please take a first aid course to learn proper cleaning of a wound. Cleaning a wound safely has many steps.
  290. 290. • Please take a first aid course to learn proper cleaning of a wound. Cleaning a wound safely has many steps. – Includes disinfecting.
  291. 291. • Please take a first aid course to learn proper cleaning of a wound. Cleaning a wound safely has many steps. – Includes disinfecting. – Includes cleaning debris.
  292. 292. • Please take a first aid course to learn proper cleaning of a wound. Cleaning a wound safely has many steps. – Includes disinfecting. – Includes cleaning debris. – Includes irrigating.
  293. 293. • Please take a first aid course to learn proper cleaning of a wound. Cleaning a wound safely has many steps. – Includes disinfecting. – Includes cleaning debris. – Includes irrigating. – Includes bandaging.
  294. 294. • Please take a first aid course to learn proper cleaning of a wound. Cleaning a wound safely has many steps. – Includes disinfecting. – Includes cleaning debris. – Includes irrigating. – Includes bandaging. First Aid, Learn more at… http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/FirstAidIndex/Fir stAidIndex
  295. 295. • The Lesson to be learned. – Please treat wounds properly. – Why wouldn’t you?
  296. 296. • Area of Focus: Bacteria and Tooth Decay
  297. 297. • Bacteria in your mouth eat food and releases lactic acid when they do cellular respiration. Acid on teeth = Decay.
  298. 298. • This is what can happen if you don’t clean your teeth and allow them to rot away.
  299. 299.  Plaque is the accumulation of bacteria and micro-organisms on a tooth. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  300. 300. • Plaque can be defined as a complex microbial community, with greater than 1010 bacteria per milligram. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  301. 301. • Plaque can be defined as a complex microbial community, with greater than 1010 bacteria per milligram. – 10,000,000,000 per milligram. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  302. 302. • Plaque can be defined as a complex microbial community, with greater than 1010 bacteria per milligram. – 10,000,000,000 per milligram. – That’s roughly 3 billion more than there are people on Earth in something that weighs about as much as a grain of rice. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  303. 303.  Tartar is dental plaque that has mineralized.
  304. 304.  Tartar is dental plaque that has mineralized.  Tartar can form when plaque is not removed from the tooth surface.
  305. 305. • What type of bacteria is seen this picture of plaque?
  306. 306. • Answer – Maybe a form of bacilli, but 400 distinct bacterial species may be found in plaque. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  307. 307. • Video Link! (Optional) Mtn. Dew Mouth. – How Mtn. Dew and other sodas can cause serious tooth decay if misused. – http://www.mefeedia.com/video/14377911 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  308. 308. ?
  309. 309. • Activity and Video - Flossing our teeth. – Please watch movie and then floss. – Movie will play again, use paper towel to wipe plaque on and dispose of. – http://www.metacafe.com/watch/3159993/how_to _floss_teeth/ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  310. 310. • Video – How to brush your teeth? – I have some old used toothbrushes. – Watch video and then we will brush our teeth. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzXRehGBE Og – I am completely kidding because that is absolutely disgusting. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  311. 311. • Video – How to brush your teeth? – I have some old used toothbrushes. – Watch video and then we will brush our teeth. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzXRehGBE Og – I am completely kidding because that is absolutely disgusting. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  312. 312. • Video – How to brush your teeth? – I have some old used toothbrushes. – Watch video and then we will brush our teeth. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mzXRehGBE Og – I am completely kidding because that is absolutely disgusting. But you can pretend to brush and smile like the person in the video. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  313. 313. • Gingivitis: A swelling and soreness of the gums that, without treatment, can cause serious gum problems and disease. Brushing your gums helps prevent. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  314. 314. • Gingivitis: A swelling and soreness of the gums that, without treatment, can cause serious gum problems and disease. Brushing your gums helps prevent. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  315. 315. • Avoid a diet heavy in sugars, also avoid drinking acidic drinks as they decay tooth enamel. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  316. 316. • Use a straw: Sugar + Acid don’t hit tooth as much. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  317. 317. • Use a straw: Sugar + Acid don’t hit tooth as much. – Straws can be a waste of plastic and end up in the landfill.  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  318. 318. • If you want healthy teeth, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  319. 319. • If you want healthy teeth, don’t smoke. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  320. 320. • If you want healthy teeth, don’t smoke. – Smoking and chewing cause dental Staining. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  321. 321.  Area of Focus: Bacterial Reproduction. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  322. 322. • Warning! Real Images of bacteria Reproduction!
  323. 323. “Please don’t watch me.” “Fission is so awkward.”
  324. 324. • What are these bacteria missing that you and I have to make babies? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  325. 325. • Answer! • A Pee-pee-dee-pee and Ahoosy ma whatsy. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  326. 326. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  327. 327.  Binary Fission: The process by which a bacterium multiplies by splitting in two. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  328. 328. Learn more about bacterial reproduction at… http://www.scienceprofonline.com/microbiology/binary-fissioncell-division-reproduction-prokaryotes.html
  329. 329.  In asexual reproduction, one individual produces offspring that are genetically identical to itself. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  330. 330. • Sexual Reproduction: Genetic material from two different individuals combines into a genetically unique offspring. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  331. 331. • Which animation is sexual reproduction and which is asexual? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  332. 332. • Which animation is sexual reproduction and which is asexual? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  333. 333. Sexual Reproduction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  334. 334. Sexual Reproduction Asexual Reproduction Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  335. 335. • Some bacteria use Conjugation – (Still considered asexual) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  336. 336. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  337. 337. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Make 15 one inch squares. • Try and make three rows of five Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  338. 338. • Draw one bacteria and have it reproduce in each square. – Box 1 has one bacteria – Box 2 has 2 – Box 3 has 4 – Box 4 has 8 – Small line represents a bacteria, use the four lines and then a cross through to make five. – Each reproduction = twenty minutes time – What are your results and time? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  339. 339. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  340. 340. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  341. 341. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  342. 342. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  343. 343. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  344. 344. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  345. 345. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  346. 346. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  347. 347. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  348. 348. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  349. 349. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  350. 350. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  351. 351. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  352. 352. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  353. 353. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  354. 354. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  355. 355. • Activity – Exploring Exponential Growth • Each box represents 20 minutes for a total of 5 hours of optimal conditions for bacteria. 1 2 4 32 64 2048 1024 8 16 128 256 512 4096 8192 16384 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  356. 356. • What if we repeated this activity but started with a small colony of 10,000 bacterium over 5 hours. 10,000 20,000 40,000 80,000 160,000 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  357. 357. • What if we repeated this activity but started with a small colony of 10,000 bacterium over 5 hours. 10,000 20,000 40,000 80,000 160,000 163,840,000 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  358. 358. • Video: Bacterial Growth, from two to many. – Time elapsed to fit into 15 seconds. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gEwzDydci Wc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  359. 359. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  360. 360. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. – Multiply that number by 10 and that’s how many bacteria are living in your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  361. 361. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. – Multiply that number by 10 and that’s how many bacteria are living in your body. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  362. 362. • You are made of more than 65 trillion human cells. – Multiply that number by 10 and that’s how many bacteria are living in your body. • Your microbiome is very important to your survival. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  363. 363. • Bacteria live in our body. They are…
  364. 364. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food.
  365. 365. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food.
  366. 366. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm.
  367. 367. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  368. 368. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  369. 369. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  370. 370. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  371. 371. • Bacteria live in our body. They are… – Mutualistic: We provide a place to live and food, while the bacteria attack harmful microbes and digest food. – Commensalistic: Most bacteria in our body, they benefit but don’t cause us harm. – Parasitic: Harmful bacteria that eat tissue and release toxins.
  372. 372. • Video Link. Your microbiome. – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AIqdPch9t0
  373. 373. • Did you hear the part of transplanting a healthy microbiome from one person into another person who needs it?
  374. 374. • Did you hear the part of transplanting a healthy microbiome from one person into another person who needs it? – Also known as a fecal transplant.
  375. 375. • Did you hear the part of transplanting a healthy microbiome from one person into another person who needs it? – Also known as a fecal transplant.
  376. 376. • Video Link. Fecal Microbiota Transplantation (FMT) – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WR99u5lc9Zg
  377. 377. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  378. 378. Positives (+) - Negatives (-) - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  379. 379. • Please record notes on the positives and negatives of bacteria. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  380. 380. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help digest food. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  381. 381. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help digest food. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  382. 382. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help digest food. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  383. 383. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help digest food. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  384. 384. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help digest food. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  385. 385. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help digest food. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  386. 386. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help to digest food and absorb vitamins. – Used in the industrial process. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  387. 387. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help to digest food and absorb vitamins. – Fecal transplants  Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  388. 388. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help to digest food and absorb vitamins. – Fecal transplants  – Used in industry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  389. 389. • A few positives of bacteria. (+) – They are a part of many food products. – Symbiotic relationships with plants (nitrogen fixation). – They decompose waste. – They recycle nutrients. – They detoxify pollution. – Help to digest food and absorb vitamins. – Fecal transplants  – Used in industry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  390. 390. • A few negatives of bacteria (-) – Bacteria can kill our species in the millions. – Bacteria destroys food and property. – Can create general unpleasantness such as bad breath, odors, acne, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  391. 391. • A few negatives of bacteria (-) – Bacteria can kill our species in the millions. – Bacteria destroys food and property. – Can create general unpleasantness such as bad breath, odors, acne, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  392. 392. • A few negatives of bacteria (-) – Bacteria can kill our species in the millions. – Bacteria destroys food and property. – Can create general unpleasantness such as bad breath, odors, acne, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  393. 393. • A few negatives of bacteria (-) – Bacteria can kill our species in the millions. – Bacteria destroys food and property. – Can create general unpleasantness such as bad breath, odors, acne, etc. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  394. 394. • Over the course of human history, an estimated 200 million people have died from Bubonic plague. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  395. 395. • Over the course of human history, an estimated 200 million people have died from Bubonic plague. – What type of bacteria is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  396. 396. • Answer! Yersinia pestis bacilli. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  397. 397. • Final Note: Viruses are generally considered non-living. – The mimivirus and mega virus are extremely large and complex viruses. • It is larger and more complex than some bacteria. – This virus still reproduces by invading cells and not on its own. – They may in time get their own Super Kingdom.
  398. 398. • Bacteria Available Sheet for Class Work
  399. 399. • Guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  400. 400. • Guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  401. 401. • Guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  402. 402. • Guess the hidden picture beneath the boxes. – Raise your hand when you think you know. You only get one guess. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  403. 403. • You should be close to page 8 on your bundled homework by now. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  404. 404. • You can now color the pictures and record important info in the white space nearby.
  405. 405. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  406. 406. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  407. 407. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  408. 408. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  409. 409. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  410. 410. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  411. 411. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  412. 412. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  413. 413. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  414. 414. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  415. 415. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  416. 416. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  417. 417. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  418. 418. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  419. 419. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  420. 420. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  421. 421. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  422. 422. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  423. 423. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  424. 424. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  425. 425. A group of organisms with similar characteristics. Produce fertile offspring. Similar DNA. -Domain - Eukarya - -Kingdom Animalia -Phylum Chordata -Class - Mammalia -Order - Primatdae -Family Hominidae
  426. 426. • Video Link! Bacteria, Archaea, Protista. – Optional and Advanced. – Save Protista for later. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vAR47g6tlA
  427. 427. • Bacteria Review Game Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy
  428. 428. • Learn More at the Tree of Life Project – http://tolweb.org/tree/
  429. 429. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p= 1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?j Please visit at least one of the ournal=tst “learn more” educational links provided in this unit and complete this worksheet.
  430. 430. • “AYE” Advance Your Exploration ELA and Literacy Opportunity Worksheet – Visit some of the many provided links or.. – Articles can be found at (w/ membership to NABT and NSTA) • http://www.nabt.org/websites/institution/index.php?p=1 • http://learningcenter.nsta.org/browse_journals.aspx?jo urnal=tst

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