“Proactive Approaches for Building a
Professional Network”
Donna M. Kridelbaugh, MS
www.linkedin.com/in/dkridelbaugh
scien...
Today’s ObjectivesToday’s Objectives
1. Provide an overview of various environments in which to
meet other professionals.
...
What is ‘Networking’?What is ‘Networking’?
• Connecting and establishing relationships with a diverse base
of people to sh...
Why should you care aboutWhy should you care about
networking?networking?
• Learn about job opportunities
• Discover alter...
Where to meet science professionals?Where to meet science professionals?
• Career fairs (virtual and physical)
• LinkedIn
...
Career FairsCareer Fairs
• Discover the current status/needs of job market.
• Locating a career fair:
-University career c...
Personal Networking StoryPersonal Networking Story
• Attended career fair at Oak Ridge National Lab.
• Used career fair as...
LinkedInLinkedIn
• Use as an online resume by filling out a completed profile
and keep up-to-date (can turn off status upd...
Conferences and MeetingsConferences and Meetings
• Professional societies: national and branch.
• Government agency-organi...
Personal Networking StoryPersonal Networking Story
• Served as poster judge at the Annual Biomedical Research
Conference f...
Science CommunitiesScience Communities
• Professional societies often have their own social
media platforms (e.g., America...
LinkedIn Discussion Post: Is AWIS just a good ole' girls club?
Please note that the intentions of this question are not di...
Peer-networkingPeer-networking
• The most important (but most neglected) way to
network and build connections.
• Be a prof...
How to approach people?How to approach people?
• Prepare a two-three sentence description of your background,
skills and i...
• Targeted department head at a science mixer, which led to
circulation of my CV around the department.
• Met a parent at ...
How to approach people: Be genuine andHow to approach people: Be genuine and
find a common interestfind a common interest
...
Example ‘blind’ email with commonalities identifiedExample ‘blind’ email with commonalities identified
Dr. R.~
Recently, I...
Tools for networkingTools for networking
Simple business card*
• Name, title/institution, contact information
• List a few...
Tools for Networking: Informational InterviewTools for Networking: Informational Interview
• An informal conversation with...
Example of an email invitation for anExample of an email invitation for an
informational interviewinformational interview
...
Tools for Networking: Staying in Touch withTools for Networking: Staying in Touch with
ContactsContacts
• Within a few day...
Tools for Networking: Time ManagementTools for Networking: Time Management
• Networking is a life-long process, so start e...
Design of Networking EventsDesign of Networking Events
• Open networking events with no
structure, organization or
introdu...
Design of Networking EventsDesign of Networking Events
• Set-up of room: Provide round
tables that seat 6-8 people to
enco...
Design of Networking EventsDesign of Networking Events
• Ideas for networking events:
• Science Mixer – people present the...
Group Discussion PointsGroup Discussion Points
1. What other networking tips would you give to
another colleague?
1. What ...
How not to network!
Big Bang Theory: The Benefactor Factor
http://bit.ly/YsYffo
1321 Duke Street
Suite 210
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 894-4490 (phone)
(703) 894-4489 (fax)
http://www.awis.org
Proactive Approaches for Building a Professional Network
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Proactive Approaches for Building a Professional Network

960 views

Published on

Slides from a webinar that I presented for the Association for Women in Science in November 2012. The objectives of the webinar were to 1) provide an overview of various environments to meet other people; 2) outline several proactive techniques on how to target and approach contacts of interest; and 3) offer suggestions on how to ensure the setup of a networking event will be successful.

Published in: Career, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
960
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
265
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Proactive Approaches for Building a Professional Network

  1. 1. “Proactive Approaches for Building a Professional Network” Donna M. Kridelbaugh, MS www.linkedin.com/in/dkridelbaugh sciencementor.wordpress.com Twitter @science_mentor donna.kridelbaugh@gmail.com
  2. 2. Today’s ObjectivesToday’s Objectives 1. Provide an overview of various environments in which to meet other professionals. 2. Outline several proactive techniques on how to target and approach contacts of interest. 3. Offer suggestions on how to ensure the setup of a networking event will be successful.
  3. 3. What is ‘Networking’?What is ‘Networking’? • Connecting and establishing relationships with a diverse base of people to share resources, ideas and information. • In a perfect world, networking would be done on a daily basis but limited by a number of factors: • Cultural barriers • Time constraints • Funding issues to attend meetings • Work culture and location • Personality types
  4. 4. Why should you care aboutWhy should you care about networking?networking? • Learn about job opportunities • Discover alternative career paths • Find mentors and seek career advice • Meet potential collaborators • Support other scientists • Build a sense of community It is about who you know!!!
  5. 5. Where to meet science professionals?Where to meet science professionals? • Career fairs (virtual and physical) • LinkedIn • Science meetings (virtual and physical) • Science communities • Peer-networking on a daily basis • Social and networking events
  6. 6. Career FairsCareer Fairs • Discover the current status/needs of job market. • Locating a career fair: -University career centers or postgraduate program offices. -Local chamber of commerce or newspaper group. -Professional conferences host job fairs, career development workshops and exhibition booths. -National/international career fairs (e.g., Biospace). -Virtual career fairs (e.g., BioCareers)
  7. 7. Personal Networking StoryPersonal Networking Story • Attended career fair at Oak Ridge National Lab. • Used career fair as a career exploration exercise, not the normal walk around and hand out paper CVs. • Explained my career interests and engaged recruiters in an active discussion. • Led to new connections, names of more people to contact, informational interviews and a new direction for my career goals focusing on project management and science communications.
  8. 8. LinkedInLinkedIn • Use as an online resume by filling out a completed profile and keep up-to-date (can turn off status updates when updating info). • Advertise your custom LinkedIn url on CV, email signature and business card. • Join professional groups for discussions or post your own topics. • Connect, connect, connect…and recommend (oh and now endorse)! • See how you are connected to others (search company name and “2nd ” connection). • SimplyHired.com job search engine links up to your connections on LinkedIn.
  9. 9. Conferences and MeetingsConferences and Meetings • Professional societies: national and branch. • Government agency-organized meetings. • Technology conferences and expositions. • Employer-organized internal conferences. • Local tech and economic council meetings. • University research conferences. • Online science conferences and webinars. • Job clubs. • Organize your own meeting (e.g., poster session).
  10. 10. Personal Networking StoryPersonal Networking Story • Served as poster judge at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS). • Networked with program managers at exhibit booths by asking if each organization/institution had any new programs starting that would need a program/project manager. • Actively engaged in career development sessions. • Resulted in multiple connections, informational interviews, career development assistance and job invitations.
  11. 11. Science CommunitiesScience Communities • Professional societies often have their own social media platforms (e.g., American Society for Microbiology and ScienceCareers) for members only. • Create a complete profile so others can find you. • These sites also post discipline-specific jobs. • Join the groups on other sites (e.g., LinkedIn) and participate in discussions.
  12. 12. LinkedIn Discussion Post: Is AWIS just a good ole' girls club? Please note that the intentions of this question are not disrespectful. I was very enthusiastic when I joined AWIS last year as I was personally inspired by the idea of a group that supports all women in science. But it seems that membership may mean "women with PhDs primarily in academia". For example, the job bank is targeted to PhD level postings and I have had no luck getting involved with my local branch....they do not seem to communicate with STEM professionals outside the local university. So I just pose this question to help others stay grounded and remind members that not all women scientists are PhD level and the very fact that we are women may mean that there was a barrier to completing that PhD........ Result: Posting this discussion led to many AWIS members contacting me to discuss career development and to offer peer mentoring support. Personal Networking StoryPersonal Networking Story
  13. 13. Peer-networkingPeer-networking • The most important (but most neglected) way to network and build connections. • Be a professional “matchmaker” for colleagues: suggest contacts and make the connection via in- person, email, LinkedIn, etc. • Ask contacts to connect you with others of interest. • Also, ask professional contacts for internal referrals for jobs. • Stay social—every event can be a networking opportunity!
  14. 14. How to approach people?How to approach people? • Prepare a two-three sentence description of your background, skills and interests as an introduction to promote yourself: • See AWIS Steminar “Influence 201: Brand Yourself to Get the Results You Want” for more tips! • Try to use positive body language: hands at side, pleasant look and be engaged in the conversation. • Get people to talk about themselves: career path, interests, advice, etc. • Bottom-up approach: start with peers and have them introduce you up the ‘ranks’. • Top-down approach: if you are limited on time or not in the mood to network then target a higher ‘ranked’ person (e.g., department head) and ask for other contacts.
  15. 15. • Targeted department head at a science mixer, which led to circulation of my CV around the department. • Met a parent at a little league game who recommended speaking to his father who was an operations manager. • Conducted an informational interview with the operations manager who put me in contact with several project managers at work. • Resulted in new job responsibilities in project management to gain needed skills. Personal Networking Stories: Top-downPersonal Networking Stories: Top-down ApproachApproach
  16. 16. How to approach people: Be genuine andHow to approach people: Be genuine and find a common interestfind a common interest • Be genuine with your intent to speak with a person (i.e., don’t ask for a job, etc.)—learning life stories is what I enjoy most from talking to people. • Blind approaches to meeting people works best if you can find a common interest:  Shared contact  Belong to the same professional society  Alumni connections  Overlapping area of research
  17. 17. Example ‘blind’ email with commonalities identifiedExample ‘blind’ email with commonalities identified Dr. R.~ Recently, I volunteered at the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) as a scientific judge due to my strong interest in promoting undergraduate research programs. At the meeting, I had the opportunity to meet with a representative of your school (Jennifer C.) who suggested that I look further at the Biodesign Institute for employment opportunities. I am very interested in pursuing a career track in project management/program coordination. My background is in the life sciences having earned an M.S. in microbiology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. My professional experiences include work as a lab manager and microbiology lab coordinator/instructor. Currently, I am a research associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory where I have been conducting independent research in the area of biofuels and assisting the BioEnergy Science Center with administrative tasks such as monthly reports and database management. May I inquire as to whether you may have a need for a project manager or program coordinator in the future? I am very impressed by the range of research projects ongoing in your research center and I would enjoy being part of such an active research program. I have attached my full CV for your reference. Please let me know if you would like any further information and feel free to forward my information to anyone that may need a coordinator. Thanks for your time and consideration. Hope you are having a good Thanksgiving break!
  18. 18. Tools for networkingTools for networking Simple business card* • Name, title/institution, contact information • List a few top skills and interests • Links to LinkedIn profile, personal website, etc. • Side tip: write personal note on back of card *mollprinting.com
  19. 19. Tools for Networking: Informational InterviewTools for Networking: Informational Interview • An informal conversation with a professional to seek career development information and advice from the person in a comfortable environment. Questions to ask the interviewee: • Brief background and work history • Daily job functions • Likes/dislikes of job • Tips on preparing one’s self to transition into a similar career track • Name of two more people with whom to speak
  20. 20. Example of an email invitation for anExample of an email invitation for an informational interviewinformational interview Subject: Science Writer Career Discussion Hi Ms. K.~ It was great to meet you at the event last week! As I mentioned, I am very interested in learning more about science writing and editing to enhance my communication skill sets and as a potential career route. Currently, I have applied as a contract editor and I am working on the testing process. Plus, I have started a career development blog to get more writing experience (and to hopefully provide some good tips to scientists on professional development activities). If you have time, I would love to speak with you about your career history and see if you have any professional advice. Would you have any time next week for a brief career discussion? Thanks in advance for your help! Take care, Donna Engaging Subject Line Ask a question
  21. 21. Tools for Networking: Staying in Touch withTools for Networking: Staying in Touch with ContactsContacts • Within a few days of meeting a contact or conducting an informational interview: • Send a “thank you” email or card • Add contact to a database and/or LinkedIn (if applicable) • Remind contact of any information that they were to send or introductions to other people • Stay in touch with contact (e.g., periodic emails, phone calls, coffee/lunch) • Contact Database • Name and contact info for each person • Notes on conversations • Any action items (e.g., date to follow-up with contact) • Can be a basic Excel file or Access database • For Mac users: Bento database allows a visual display of contact information and even GIS information can be added
  22. 22. Tools for Networking: Time ManagementTools for Networking: Time Management • Networking is a life-long process, so start early in your career. • Designate time each week (or as your schedule allows) to devote to networking and set personal goals: • 10 minutes a week on discussion boards. • Meet one new contact a week. • Conduct one informational interview every two weeks. • Find one or two conferences to attend each year. • Join a professional society and participate in a local meeting. • Disclaimer: Do not waste time contacting someone who doesn’t want to talk (3 strikes out rule) and avoid negative people.
  23. 23. Design of Networking EventsDesign of Networking Events • Open networking events with no structure, organization or introductions = epic failure. • Scientists tend to be introverts (not just a stereotype) and a crowd of people is intimidating and just overwhelming. • Design of networking events needs to take into account the personality types and provide a comfortable, interactive environment.
  24. 24. Design of Networking EventsDesign of Networking Events • Set-up of room: Provide round tables that seat 6-8 people to encourage mixing. • Keep information to a limited time and allow time at end for interactions. • Designate ‘ambassadors’ to mingle and introduce people. • Also, consider rotating time of day/location of events to meet needs. • Attendees: consider taking a friend and team together to meet people.
  25. 25. Design of Networking EventsDesign of Networking Events • Ideas for networking events: • Science Mixer – people present their work in informal setting (tip from AWIS member Kirstin Roundy). • 20 images x 20 seconds • http://www.pecha-kucha.org • Play episodes of Science Friday, Big Bang Theory, etc. and follow with an open discussion. • Host a game night: science trivia, chess, etc. • Start a book club. • Organize a “kitchen science” night (and encourage families to bring their kids). • Hold a community fundraiser (e.g., ‘Science Bowl’).
  26. 26. Group Discussion PointsGroup Discussion Points 1. What other networking tips would you give to another colleague? 1. What type of networking events have been the most successful in your personal experience? *More specific information on networking resources can be found on my blog: sciencementor.wordpress.com
  27. 27. How not to network! Big Bang Theory: The Benefactor Factor http://bit.ly/YsYffo
  28. 28. 1321 Duke Street Suite 210 Alexandria, VA 22314 (703) 894-4490 (phone) (703) 894-4489 (fax) http://www.awis.org

×