Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

SciCATS Present... Telling Your Science as a Story (March 8, 2017)

94 views

Published on

Slides from the March 8, 2017 SciCATS workshop on Telling Your Science as a Story. Facilitated by Christine Ackerley, Nicole Balsdon, and Koby Michaels at the BC Science Charter Outreach Workshop (Vancouver, BC). Artwork by Armin Mortazavi.

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

SciCATS Present... Telling Your Science as a Story (March 8, 2017)

  1. 1. Telling your science as a story
  2. 2. Hello!Science Communication Action Team (SciCATS) Koby Michaels, UBC Christine Ackerley, SFU Nicole Balsdon, Beaty Biodiversity Museum
  3. 3. When are stories useful?
  4. 4. Stories help make your message more Meaningful Memorable Engaging
  5. 5. When are stories useful?
  6. 6. When are stories useful?
  7. 7. When are stories useful?
  8. 8. When are stories useful?
  9. 9. When are stories useful? Non-experts ...and experts
  10. 10. Benefits and drawbacks
  11. 11. Benefits and drawbacks
  12. 12. What is a story?
  13. 13. “The story...is one of the basic tools invented by the mind of man, for the purpose of gaining understanding.”- Ursula K Le Guin
  14. 14. “Storytelling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today.” - Robert McKee
  15. 15. A story ≠ _____ and ______ , And then________ , And, _________ . . .
  16. 16. A story = _____ and ______ , But ________ , therefore, _________
  17. 17. A story = Kansas and boring , But tornado ! therefore, journey home from Oz and personal growth
  18. 18. Stories are everywhere
  19. 19. Audience. Audience. audience.
  20. 20. Where is the story? Story can be a... × Person: Hidden Figures × An idea: CRISPR × A cell line: HeLa cells × An interesting result: NASA discovers 7 exoplanets
  21. 21. Parts of a Story
  22. 22. Parts of stories
  23. 23. Parts of stories Setting Character Problem Action Result
  24. 24. Characters Scientist How did you change throughout the study? Co-Authors How did other people connect through the study? Place What is so special about your lab or research area? Subject Why is your organism, experiment, or method so important? Idea How did you come up with this idea? Process Frustration, emotion, trial and error, lab stories, and more!
  25. 25. Naming Spiders Storytelling in action: Dr. Wayne Maddison, UBC
  26. 26. Stories can be short “Named for the country of the type locality, in honour of the 150th anniversary of Canada’s confederation.” Pellenes (Pellenattus) canadensis
  27. 27. Stories can be personal “Named after my late father, Robert John Maddison, who introduced me to the small things in nature through fishing bait and saturniid cocoons...His gentle encouragement let me find my own love for the riches of biodiversity.” Habronattus roberti
  28. 28. Stories May Elaborate “Scientific papers appear to be devoid of emotion, with just the facts, analyses, and careful (we hope) conclusions. To an author, though, a paper holds much more than this. It is woven with hidden threads of personal meaning...”
  29. 29. Let’s
  30. 30. Activity - Tell your science story Introduce Groups of 2-4 30-60 second intros: - What science do you do? - Why do you love science? - How did you get here? Discuss Choose one of the introductions to expand as a group. Flesh out using the story template. Share Plan to share your story, give, and receive feedback.
  31. 31. Koby’s Story
  32. 32. Activity - tell your science story Introduce Groups of 2-4 30-60 second intros: - What science do you do? - Why do you love science? - How did you get here? Discuss Choose one of the introductions to expand as a group. Flesh out using the story template. Share Plan to share your story, give, and receive feedback.
  33. 33. Simplified Hero’s Journey 1) The beginning - Ordinary world: the hero's normal life. Call and refusal of adventure: the hero faces a problem, but doesn’t take action. Finding a mentor: Someone gives the hero advice and motivation 2) Starting your journey Final Training Test/Enter the unknown: The hero leaves the ordinary world for the first time. 3, 4, 5) Trials - The hero learns the rules of the new world. During this time, her will is tested, she makes friends and faces foes. 6) Preparing for the final test Sacrifice: Setbacks occur and the hero tries new approaches or ideas. 7) Resolution Climax: The hero experiences a major hurdle or obstacle. After persevering, the hero accomplishes her goal. Wrap Up/return to normal: The hero begins her journey back to ordinary life. She applies new knowledge to help others in the ordinary world.
  34. 34. Time Left
  35. 35. Share × Each group shares a story × Add specific positive and constructive comments
  36. 36. Share × Any last questions or comments?
  37. 37. Apply Your Learning Use your story to introduce yourself and start conversations during breaks and social time today.
  38. 38. In summary × Storytelling is a useful tool to have, but isn’t the only tool available to us × Storytelling is a powerful vehicle for your message × You owe it to your science to share it well - sharing is part of the scientific process
  39. 39. Thank You! Chat with us! Find us @sciCATSyvr × Spider photographs by Wayne Maddison × Illustrations by @armin.scientoonist × Special thanks to the entire SciCATS team × Presentation template and icons by SlidesCarnival

×