All about sheep and goats

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All about sheep and goats

  1. 1. Wild-n-Woolly<br />Everything about sheep and goats<br />
  2. 2. After dogs, sheep and goats were the earliest animals to be domesticated (tamed) by man.<br />
  3. 3. Sheep and goats are ruminants.<br />Their stomach has four compartments and they chew their cud. <br />
  4. 4. They don’t teeth on their upper front dental pad.<br />
  5. 5. They carry their babies for about 5 months. Pregnancy is called gestation.<br />
  6. 6. They give birth to 1, 2, or 3 babies.<br />Usually 2, sometimes more.<br />
  7. 7. They are prey animals, vulnerable to attack by various predators<br />
  8. 8. Sometimes, guardian dogs are used to protect sheep and goats from predators.<br />Llamas and donkeys will also protect sheep and goats from predators.<br />
  9. 9. This is a sheep.<br />
  10. 10. This is a goat.<br />
  11. 11. Most sheep grow wool.<br />And need to be sheared at least once a year.<br />
  12. 12. Not all sheep produce wool.<br />Hair sheep are slick, or they shed their coats naturally.<br />
  13. 13. Originally all sheep were hair sheep.<br />The Mouflon is the ancestor of modern sheep breeds.<br />
  14. 14. Goat bodies are covered by hair.<br />
  15. 15. But some goats grow fibers that are similar to wool (mohair and cashmere) and must be sheared or combed out.<br />Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/paulesson/2353307653/<br />
  16. 16. Almost all goats have horns<br />
  17. 17. Sometimes horns are removed (for safety reasons) when the goat is a baby. <br />
  18. 18. Most sheep don’t have horns.<br />They are polled (naturally hornless).<br />
  19. 19. But, some sheep have horns<br />Usually just the males (rams) in a breed.<br />
  20. 20. Goat horns spread out and are more upright.<br />
  21. 21. Sheep horns curl along the side of the head.<br />
  22. 22. Many goats (either sex) have beards.<br />
  23. 23. Sheep don’t have beards, but some have manes<br />
  24. 24. Most sheep are white.(Their faces and legs may be different colors.)<br />White wool is preferred because it can be dyed any color.<br />
  25. 25. Some sheep are colored.<br />
  26. 26. Goats come in different colors.<br />
  27. 27. Sheep are grazers.<br />They like to eat grass that’s close to the ground.<br />
  28. 28. Goats are browsers<br />They like to eat vegetation that is higher up.<br />
  29. 29. Goats do not like to get wet.<br />Sheep don’t mind, though they don’t like to get their feet wet.<br />
  30. 30. Sheep tend to be bigger, fatter, and more muscular.<br />The babies (called lambs) grow faster.<br />
  31. 31. Goats tend to be leaner and more angular.<br />The babies (called kids) grow slower.<br />
  32. 32. Male goats stink, especially during the breeding season (rutt).<br />A male goat is called a buck or billy (slang).<br />
  33. 33. Rams do not have a strong odor.<br />But they can be mean, especially during the breeding season.<br />
  34. 34. Sheep are shy, timid, and aloof – easily spooked.<br />They have a stronger flocking (grouping) instinct than goats. They get highly agitated if they are separated from the rest of the flock.<br />
  35. 35. Goats are more curious, independent, and adventurous.<br />The are harder to contain in fences.<br />
  36. 36. Which is it?a sheep or goat?<br />
  37. 37. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Sheep<br />
  38. 38. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Goat<br />
  39. 39. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Sheep<br />
  40. 40. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Sheep<br />
  41. 41. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Goat<br />
  42. 42. Are these sheep or goats?<br />Sheep<br />
  43. 43. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Sheep<br />
  44. 44. Is this a sheep or goat?<br />Goat<br />Source: http://www.flickr.com/photos/abernmf1/3608191883/<br />
  45. 45. Are these sheep or goats?<br />Sheep<br />
  46. 46. The easiest way to tell the difference between a sheep and goat is to look at its tail.<br />SHEEP<br />GOATS<br />Down<br />Up<br />Sheep tails are usually docked (shortened) so that manure doesn’t collect on the hindquarters of the sheep.<br />
  47. 47. What do we raise sheep and goats for?<br />Sheep and goats are multi-purpose.<br />
  48. 48. Sheep and goats are raised mostly for meat.<br />The meat from a young sheep (< 1 year) is called lamb.<br />The meat from an older sheep (> 1 year) is called mutton.<br />The meat from a goat is called chevon (French) or cabrito (Spanish).<br />
  49. 49. Sheep and goats are raised for dairy (milk).<br />Most sheep and goat milk is made into cheese.<br />Sheep are goat milk have many healthful qualities.<br />People that are lactose intolerant can often drink goat or sheep milk.<br />
  50. 50. Sheep and goats are raised for fiber.<br />WOOL FROM SHEEP<br />MOHAIR AND CASHMERE<br />FROM GOATS<br />
  51. 51. Sheep and goats are used to control (eat) unwanted plants.<br />
  52. 52. Sheep and goats are used as research models and to produce medical products.<br />Dissecting a sheep heart.<br />Sheep blood is a common culture media.<br />
  53. 53. I hope you have fun learning about sheep and goats. <br />PowerPoint by Susan Schoenian, Sheep & Goat Specialist, University of Maryland Extension, sschoen@umd.edu<br />

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