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HurricaneNature’s Weather Monster
Where do these monster storms get the power to dothis?In the slides to follow we will find out:*the formation of these mon...
FORMATION• Strong, hot winds blow off of the Sahara into the  Mid-Atlantic• These winds interact with the warm waters  dev...
LOCATIONS OF STRIKES• Generally hurricanes continue to head west• They are often drawn into the warm waters of the  Caribb...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Gavelston                  (Prior to naming)•   Landfall date: September 8, 1900•   Landfall location: ...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: “Long Island      Express” (also prior to naming)•   Landfall date: September 21, 1938•   Landfall loca...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Camille•   Landfall date: August 17, 1969•   Landfall location: Mississippi Coast•   Category: 5•   Dea...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Hugo•   Landfall date: September 22, 1989•   Landfall location: Charleston, SC•   Category: 4•   Death ...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Andrew•   Landfall dates: August 24 & 26, 1992•   Landfall locations: Homestead, FL & Central LA•   Cat...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Katrina•   Landfall date: August 29, 2005•   Landfall location: Buras, LA•   Category: 4•   Death toll:...
HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Sandy            (aka, Frankenstorm)•   Landfall date: October 29, 2012•   Landfall location: New York,...
MOST DAMAGING PARTS• Hurricanes contain three very damaging  factors  – Winds  – Storm surges  – Flooding
WINDS• Winds can get as high  as 200 miles an hour  and can cause this to  happen:
WINDSOr this:
FLOODING• Rains can often  become a huge part of  the hurricane as it  releases energy and  moisture at landfall• This can...
STORM SURGE  The storm surge is a       • Like this:  giant wall of water that  thrusts itself inland  along coastal areas...
STORM SURGE• Or this:         • Or this:
Citations• All photographs are copyright Christopher  Schobert, 2006• Hurricane stats from the National Hurricane  Center’...
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Hurricane power point

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Hurricane power point

  1. 1. HurricaneNature’s Weather Monster
  2. 2. Where do these monster storms get the power to dothis?In the slides to follow we will find out:*the formation of these monsters*the places these monsters can strike*historic examples of these strikes*the most dangerous aspects of these freaks
  3. 3. FORMATION• Strong, hot winds blow off of the Sahara into the Mid-Atlantic• These winds interact with the warm waters developing into off shore low pressure systems• Fed by the warm waters these tropical depressions develop into giant weather machines• These machines are highly organized, drawing water and energy from the ocean and heading for land
  4. 4. LOCATIONS OF STRIKES• Generally hurricanes continue to head west• They are often drawn into the warm waters of the Caribbean sea• They are also drawn into the southeast portion of United States where they lose energy and spawn more localized systems (tornados and severe thunderstorms)• They are occasionally drawn up into the North Atlantic where they most often dissipate completely in the cold waters• Even more occasionally they strike the northeastern United States as we just found out this week with Sandy
  5. 5. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Gavelston (Prior to naming)• Landfall date: September 8, 1900• Landfall location: Galveston, TX• Category: 4• Death toll: 8, 000• Damages: 30 million dollars
  6. 6. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: “Long Island Express” (also prior to naming)• Landfall date: September 21, 1938• Landfall location: Long Island, NY• Category: 5• Death toll: 600• Damages: 308 million dollars
  7. 7. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Camille• Landfall date: August 17, 1969• Landfall location: Mississippi Coast• Category: 5• Death toll: 256• Damages: 1.42 billion dollars
  8. 8. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Hugo• Landfall date: September 22, 1989• Landfall location: Charleston, SC• Category: 4• Death toll: 21• Damages: 7 billion dollars
  9. 9. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Andrew• Landfall dates: August 24 & 26, 1992• Landfall locations: Homestead, FL & Central LA• Category: 4• Death toll: 23• Damages: 26.5 billion dollars
  10. 10. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Katrina• Landfall date: August 29, 2005• Landfall location: Buras, LA• Category: 4• Death toll: 1200• Damages: 200 billion (the cost of a four year war)
  11. 11. HISTORIC EXAMPLES: Sandy (aka, Frankenstorm)• Landfall date: October 29, 2012• Landfall location: New York, New Jersey• Death toll: 149• Damages: Not know yet but considering the populated areas and infrastructure that were hit it is going to be high
  12. 12. MOST DAMAGING PARTS• Hurricanes contain three very damaging factors – Winds – Storm surges – Flooding
  13. 13. WINDS• Winds can get as high as 200 miles an hour and can cause this to happen:
  14. 14. WINDSOr this:
  15. 15. FLOODING• Rains can often become a huge part of the hurricane as it releases energy and moisture at landfall• This can be the result• Note the water lines on this sign
  16. 16. STORM SURGE The storm surge is a • Like this: giant wall of water that thrusts itself inland along coastal areas during a hurricane• Depending on the size extreme damage can occur
  17. 17. STORM SURGE• Or this: • Or this:
  18. 18. Citations• All photographs are copyright Christopher Schobert, 2006• Hurricane stats from the National Hurricane Center’s Website: Hurricanes in History.2012. National Hurricane Center. November 3, 2012 <http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/outreach/history/>

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